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December 06, 1967 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-12-06

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"HREE

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 6,1867

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE T

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 6,1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE T HUKE

.'

WORLD NEWS DEVELOPMENTS

Johnson Plea Fails To Halt Steel Price Rise

By The Associated Press to achieve a sound and satisfac-
PITTSBURGH - Two more tory settlement by the union's Dec.
major steel companies raised 14 target date.3
prices yesterday despite a plea for The UAW anounced last week
restraint from President Johnson. that if no agreement is reached
One added price boosts to even by that date, a strike deadline
more product lines used in a wide would be set for some time after
range of consumer and industrial the Christmas and New Year holi-
goods. days.
Armco Steel Corp., the sixth* *
ranked producer, aid No. 3 Re- "
public Steel followed the lead of Riots Erupt
top ranked U.S. Steel and No. 2
Bethlehem in announcing $5 an
ton increases on cold rolled sheets. n Indi
Armco also boosted prices $5 a
ton on hot rolled sheets and $4 a NEW DEl II, India-Riots and
ton on galvanized sheet and strip violence were reported from many
steels. parts of India yesterday.
If other producers follow Arm- In Calcutta, New Delhi and
co's increases in these product Andhra Pradesh, mobs of political
.areas, the industry will have and student demonstrators werek
raised prices product by product reported locked in bloody strug-
this year on 80 per cent of ship- gles with police.
ments, or the equivalent of a gen- In the northern states, fanati-
eral increase. cal Hindu followers were enraged
There was no immediate com- over a government decision to en-
ment from Washington. force teaching of English in
President Johnson told news- schools, and foreign embassies ad-
men about the same time Bethle- vised their nationals to avoid the
hem was raising its prices Mon- area.
day, "We have exercised such The warning came after anti-
rights as we have in the matter." English language mobs had man-
Johnson said he had "very handled European tourists, hurled
strong felt views" on rising prices stones and forced a busload of
and wages. But asked if he plan- tourists at Benares to "run the
ned any emergency controls, he gantlet" of sticks and stones.
said, "No such proposals are un- Lucknow was another trouble
der consideration at this time." spot:
Behind much of the rising wave'

cer, venereal disease, tuberculosis,
heart disease and mental illness.
Separate programs for these were
consolidated into a program of
lump sum grants last year.
The first administration pro-
posal, for a new $40 million fed-
eral rat extermination program
under the Department of Housing
and Urban Development, was
hooted down by the House.
Members had second thoughts,
however, and added the money-
$20 million each in the current
and next fiscal years - .to the
health measure.
Bohlen To Fill
Kohler's Post

-Associated Press
DISASTER IN MEXICO
Rescue workers carry one of 15 bodies recovered from debris left after the collapse of a bridge under
construction in Mexico City. At least 30 workers are believed to have died in the accident Monday.
FAVOR AUTONOMY:

--Associated Press
CHARLES E. BOHLEN, left, was yesterday named by President
Johnson to replace Foy D. Kohler, right, as deputy undersecretary
of state for political affairs. Bohlen has been ambassador to
France for five years.

I

Blocakan odf NATO Extension
into Cyprus Suits- Soviet Aim
Associated Press News Analysis f Avoiding a Turkish invasion of j For the last few weeks the

ey have

MOSCOW - The Soviet Union
has reason to be well satisfied
with the outcome of the Cyprus
crisis.
The Cypriot government's re-
assertion of its sovereignty after
the confrontation between Turkey
and Greece fits into the long
term Soviet goal of a completely
independent Cyprus.
Soviet policy has been tailored
to prevent Cyprus's being united
with Greece or falling under
Turkish control, since both Greece
and Turkey are members of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion.
Keep NATO Out
A basic theme of Soviet state-
ments in Cyprus has been opposi-
tion to any extension of the NATO
system to the east Mediterranean
*t island.
This represents a power con-
sideration of wanting to deny a
valuable position to potential
enemies.
The Kremlin has wanted local
politics to have more chance to
play themselves out in hopes of a
more important role for the Cyp-'
riot Communist party.
It is estimated to have about
10,000 members. They are firmly
oriented toward Moscow for
guidance, a valued attitude in
these days when Moscow has to
worry about pro-Peking and neu-
tralist Communist attitudes.
Less Influence
Greece has had a strongly anti-
Communist influence in Cyprus.
But with the forced withdrawal
now of Greek troops from the is-
land and the renoval of, Greek
Gen. George Grivas, this influ-
ence is likely to wane.
And with it, the possibility of
Cypriot union with Greece will
wane. Both developments suit
the Soviets.

Cyprus suits them too.
Partly as a reaction against a
disliked Greek regime, Soviet
leaders have tipped their Cyprus
policy slightly in favor of Turkey
lately. They have accepted Turk-
ish concern for the Turkish min-
ority on Cyprus as legitimate.
It will make things easier for
Soviet political commentators.

been trying to blame the Cyprus
crisis on NATO.,
But they found it difficult to
explain just how NATO could be
responsible when two NATO
members were at daggers point,
and a third member, the United
States, was playing the leading
role in trying to resolve the crisis.

UAW, GM Call
News Blackout
DETROIT - The United Auto
Workers Union and General
Motors agreed yesterday to clamp
a news blackout on negotiations,
indicating progress in- efforts to
reach agreement on a national
contract covering some 380,000
workers.
UAW President Walter P. Reu-
ther led a union bargaining team
to the No. 1 automaker for main
table negotiations following a
week of subcommittee work on the
industry's last major labor pact of
the year.
In a joint statement, both sides
said they would make every effort

of unrest in Calcutta was the
growing political chasm between
Prime Minister Indira Gandhi's
central government and support-
ers of the leftist United Front
party, which Mrs. Gandhi dis-
missed from office in the West
Bengal State Legislature.
* *' *
France .Bars
Carmichael
PARIS - French police barred
Stokely Carmichael from France
last night, preventing him from
speaking at a rally called to de-
nounce the war in Vietnam, of-
ficial sources said.
The sources reported that Car-
micael, who was detained at Orly

Airport, would be put aboard a
plane today for any destination of
his choice. He had arrived from
Stockholm via Copehagen.
Though the reason for Carmi-
chael's detention was not explain-
ed, the sources said Carmichael
had been told by Swedish police
before his departure from Stock-
holm that he would be considered
"undesirable on French territory."
Carmichael was scheduled to
address the anti war rally tonight.
First word of his detention came
from one of the rally organizers.
Officials then conceded that he
had been refused entry into
France.
Carmichael said in Stockholm he
was returning to the United
States. On his arrival, the State
Department will pick up his pass-
port for visiting Cuba on a tour
that included Africa as well as
Europe.
The Vietnam National Commit-
tee, which organized the protest
rally, said in a statement Car-
FREE
1 "McCARTHY IN '68"
bumper strip

michael was being pressured to
take the first plane to the United
States.
"To oblige Stokely Carmichael
to return to the United States is'
to deliver him to these who ask
nothing better than to be his mur-
derers," the statement said.
* .* *
LBJ Signs
Health Bill,
WASHINGTON - President
Johnson signed yesterday a bill
that authorizes $589 million more
in federal health aid over the
next three years, including $40
million for rat extermination.
Johnson said the bill, which
extends the health cooperation
act for three years, opens -up to
states and cities an opportunity

WASHINGTON - President
Johnson appointed career diplo-
mat Charles E. Bohlen yesterday
to replace Foy D. Kohler as
deputy undersecretary of state for
political affairs.
Bohlen has been ambassador to
France for the past five years.
Kohler resigned to join the fac-
ulty of the University of Miami
where he will teach international
affairs. He was in the foreign
service for 36 years.
The No. 4 position at the State
Department, now vacated by Koh-
ler, is regarded as the highest, post
a career diplomat can reach. The
top posts of secretary and two un-
dersecretaries are usually held by
political appointees.
Kohler's resignation came as a
surprise, but authoritative sources
said he informed the President
and Secretary of State Dean Rusk
after his return from Moscow
about his ambitions to go into
teaching.
Kohler is 59, Bohlen 63. Both
are career ambassadors, the high-
est rank in the foreign service.
There was no immediate specu-

First Heart Transplant
Remains 'Satisfactory'

"to mount a total war against lation on Bohlen's successor in
sickness and disease." Paris. The feeling in some quar-
Most of the money is to help ters is that Johnson will not be
states fight such diseases as can- in a hurry to name a new envoy.

CAPE TOWN, South Africa R)
-Hospital tests yesterday showed
the heart transplanted to Louis
Washkansky is functioning well,
reported the surgeon who per-
formed the first operation of this
kind.
The 55-year-old Cape Town
businessman had his first solid
food since the operation three
days ago, a soft boiled egg for
breakfast. He told attendants he
was hungry. For lunch he had
soup.
Prof. Christian Barnard, 44, the
surgeon who performed the oper-
ation, told reporters Washkansky
is being kept in- an oxygen tent,
but only to keep him isolated.
Dr. S. C. W. Bosman, heart
surgeon at the Groote Schuur
Hospital, said Washkansky's con-
dition "is very satisfactory" and
"all is going as well as any open
heart op'eration can behave."
Medical experts say the critical
period will begin about Sunday
when there may be some indica-
tions whether Washkansky's body
will reject the new heart. Bar-
nard said drugs are being admin-
istered to suppress possible rejec-
tion.

The heart of Denise Ann Dar-
vall, 25, an accounting machine
operator killed by an automobile
Saturday, was implanted to re-
place Washkansky's diseased or-
gan in the first operation of its
kind.
A child could reasonably be ex-
pected to live much longer with
a bad heart, while the life expec-
tancy of Washkansky had to be
measured in terms "of days or at
the most weeks," he explained.
A Cape Town druggist may be
the next receiver of a transplant-
ed heart, but Iarnard said a sec-
ond transplant was weeks away.

ALL ART PRINTS
LOANED
RETURN
512 SAB-7:00-9:00
December 4-8, 1967

STEAK d& SHAKE

NOW OPEN NIGHTS

Send self-addressed, stamped No.
10 envelope to: TOPP, P.O. Box
1802, Chicago, Illinois 60690.

U

NOW THROUGH SUNDAY!

I

ANNOUNCING A DESPERATION

CINEMA

GUILD

CINEMA

II

Children's Community School
BENEFIT CONCERT
LItBUNY iOUSB
Wednesday, December 7,9:00 P.M.

BENEFIT PERFORMANCE
Cinema Guild Being Overburdened with Legal
Fees for the "Flaming Creatures" Trial.
Cinema II Being Heavily in Debt and Faced
with Possible Disbandment in January.
to the rescue, with few misgivings

with: REV. RICHARD BLANK-Vibes
DON GILLIS-Piano
JOHN MILLER-Bass
GEOFFREY SMITH-Drums

I

50c Donation to Children's School

HUMPHREY BOGART
LAUREN BACALL,

UNION-LEAGUE

IN

THE

BIG

"The Good Intention"

SLEEP
Screenplay by
WILLIAM FAULKNER

CATHLEEN VICTOR
NESBITT BUONO
IN.
STUDS TERKEL'S
Scenery and Lighting by
ELDON ELDER

on

Directed by
HOWARD HAWKS

North Campus

"BOGART'S BEST."--Hubert Cohen

I

ALSO, CHAPTER 7

FREE MIXER

Flash

r

- .

Gordon Conquers The Un

iverse

Directed by
MARCELLA CISNEY

I

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