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December 02, 1967 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-12-02

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PAGE TWO

'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAF. b CEMBE'it 1 A i7

P AE°W O.,, _ _I f1 U ' I

ti7A l V 9 saA a 1V a in 1 a f., .., ,

music

'Messiah'

Again

By MARK LAFER Elizabeth Mosher,'the young s
MESSIAH prano soloist-a native of Cal
Geoge Frederick Handel fornia-more than carried h
ElizabethMosher, Soprano share of the solo work with
Waldie Anderson, Tenor voice that not only had little di
Huguette Tourangeau, Contralto ficulty in the more demandir
Ara Berberian, Bass sections such as her final solo
University Choral Union know that my redeemer liveth
Members of the Interlochen Arts I cannot, however, he as lavis
Academy Orchestra with my praise for the contralt
Mary McCall Stubbins, Organist Huguette Tourangeau.
Charles Fisher, Harpsichordist Miss Tourangeau, a nativet
Lester McCoy, Conductor Montreal, has just recently begu
For the seventy-fifth time, the to make a name for herself in ti
University Choral Union in a per- world of music, having debutE
formance of Handel's oratorio with the New York City Opera th2
Messiah reigned in glory. The 335 past March. I have no complain
voices, supported by the Inter- about her voice or the vocal aspen
lochen Arts Academy Orchestra of her interpretations, but she hi
and a quartet of more than com- the annoying trait of consistent'
petent soloists, showed how pro- ignoring the audience-her nosei
fessional a performing amateur her score. It is a distracting hab
group can be. (Handel should have and detracts from an otherwi
been as lucky to have found as excellent job.
good a group in his time for any For the two men, there cou
price.) be nothing but superlatives. M
It is rare that this work is done Anderson, tenor, should be fami
in its entirety; (I once sat through iar to many here due to his fr
a complete performance and really quent appearances - often
have no wish to repeat the ex- school of music productions. T1
perience) but the Choral Union winner of many competitions it
presentation is more complete eluding the Metropolitan Ope:
than most. And, although I missed regional auditions, he is current
the contralto-tenor duet "Oh teaching at the Interlochen Ar
Grave, Where is thy victory," the Academy and also working for
inclusion this year of the chorus doctorate in music through tl
"Since by.-man came death" more University. 1
than. made up for the deletion of Ara Berberian has in a sho
the other section. Besides, it's quite time become one of the leadir
different from the average Handel bassos in the United States. H3
chorus in that more than one performance-as well as those
emotional state is evoked-first Mr. Anderson-were marked n
mourning, then triumphant joy. only by the quality of their voic
It's quite effective, but by the excellent clarity
Regarding the soloists-for the their reading of the text.
first time that this listener can The orchestral accompanime:
think of, all the soloists chosen by the Interlochen Arts Acaden
for a choral performance here all Orchestra is a delicate subjec
displayed not only a high degree One could complain that tl
of competency technically but also strings, especially the violins
of, dramatic interpretation. This some very exposed areas, sour
latter ability is of the utmost im- thin. But one can't expect a grow
portance; for in the Messiah there of students, none older than nin
is no stage action, being an ora- teen to sound like the Philadelph
torio, and also no true story line.
The relation of the textual selec-
tions to each other is dependent onjgbt at 8:30 P.M.
upon the soloists. T
__ __ __ -f ry k

'Reigns i
o- Orchestra. And it should also be
i- mentioned that their performance
er was more than adequate (and con-
a siderably better than last year
f- when they had less than two weeks
ng notice after the Detroit Symphony
"I cancelled out.)
." One gets the feeling that to be
sh overly critical of any performance
o, of Messiah puts one in a class
with people who steal candy from
of infants. Last night's performance

Civil Rights
1 Glory' Coimmittee
was sufficiently well done that P asses B ill
I'm not even in the least compelled L
to place myself in so vulnerable a LANSING (P)-The House Civil
position. There will be two other Rights Committee, meeting amid
performances of Messiah, tonight charges of meddling by the gov-
at 8:30 p.m. (which will also be ernor's office, yesterday sent the
carried live on WUOM, 91.7 FM), controversial open occupancy bill
and Sunday afternoon at 2:30 p.m. to the House floor and recom-
Tickets are still available. And go mended passage.
-because the audience-in the Earlier this week, the committee
'Hallelujah" chorus needs all the members reached a compromise

Mills' Adj ournment
Blocks Tax Increase

help it can get.

Thai Provinces Put
Under Martial Law
BANGKOK, Thailand (A)-The trained 1st Army Division into
government yesterday imposed Kuiburi district of Prachaup Pr
martial law on five southern and ince, 150 miles south of Bang
central provinces-including one on the Kra Isthmus which li
close to Bangkok-in an effort to Thailand and Malaysia.
thwart a growing Communist ter- Terrorists have hit governm
ror movement. forces hard in Prachaup Provi
The decision showed the gov- in recent months. In August a
ernment's concern about Commu- lice convoy was ambushed andJ
nist infiltrators in the region close police were killed. A month la
to Bangkok, which until a few a few miles away, terrorists
months ago was thought to be re- a second patrol killing all 10,
latively free of terrorists. ficers and men.
Several hundred Chinese Com- Provinces put under full milit
munist guerillas have long been control are Prachaup, Petcht
operating in the southern prov- and Rejburi in the south
inces since their rebellion was Kanchanaburi and Supanburi
crushed in Malaysia in 1960. the central plain. Rejbury, K
A decree gives the government chanaburi and Supanburi are w:
sweeping powers to arrest and hold in 60 miles of Bangkok.
Communist suspects and to relo- The government'sdecision
cate whole villages in an effort to impose martial law indicates
cut off any support for the guer- battle against terrorists is
rillas. going as well as advertised.
Martial law has been in force for Terrorists in the country are
several years in seven provinces of timated to number about 2,
northeast Thailand where Com- They are known to be active it
munists had concentrated their of Thailand's 71 provinces.
efforts.

the
rov-
kok
iks
ent
ince
Po-
five
iter,
hit
of-
,tary
buri
and
in
an-
ith-
to
the
not
es-
000.
n 17

agreement to take out the $500
ceiling on damages paid to the
claimant in a housing case and
to insert permission for the re-
spondent to sue the state for
damages.
Executive Interference
The House could overturn the
committee when it takes up the
m u c h-debated, much-amended
housing bill later this month.
The committee had not been
scheduled to meet until Dec. 11.
Rep. David Holmes, D-Detroit,
charged that the Friday meeting
was called and the amendments
offered at the insistence of Gov.
George Romney's aides.
Holmes told reporters: "I re-
sent very much being brought back
here because of interference by
the executive branch."
Gov. Romney is vacationing in
Arizona.
Probable Passage
Acting Gov. William Milliken
said he was glad the committee
voted out the bill and added:
"Passage of open housing still is
not assured.
"But I believe, on the basis of
my talks with the legislators, that
well before Christmas we will
have, for all of Michigan, an ef-
fective and equitable open housing
law."
The House is in recess until Dec.
12. Legislative leaders have vowed
action on the open housing bill
this year.

WASHINGTON (!P)-Johnson ad-
ministration officials worked be-
hind the scenes yesterday to keep
alive the tax increase proposal
they say is despelately needed to
avert inflation, a credit crisis, and
more serious attacks on the dol-
lar. The last visible hope of sub-
stantial congressional action this
year died Thursday.
The House Ways and Means
Committee adjourned after hear-j
ing administration arguments for
two days.
Chairman Wilbur D. Mills (D-
Ark) advised President Johnson's
spokesmen to confer with the Ap-
propriations Committee on spend-
ing cuts. He suggested these cuts
should be larger than the $4.1 bil-
lion they proposed.
The Appropriations Committee
chairman, Rep. George H. Mahon
(D-Tex), told a reporter there are
no present plans for the committee
to hear the administration offi-
cials. And he said no retroactive

bills are in the works.
However it was understood Bud-
get Director Charles L. Schultze
is keeping close informal contact
with Mahon. The official Treasury
position is that there is still hope
of at least starting work on a
"spending cut-tax increase" bill
before Congress adjourns.
But the advancing season is
steadily reducing the few remain-
ing hopes that a start can be made
before the new session starts in
January. The legislators are now
trying to wind up their business
and go home for at least a few
days before Christmas.
The senior members of the Ways
and Means Committee will be tied
up beginning Tuesday, probably
for at least a week, in conferences
with senators on the Social Secur-
ity benefit increase bill.
The Senate passed a more ex-
pensive version and negotiations to
resolve the differences are expected
to be prolonged.

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