100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 02, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAVIV TAR.VIr

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2, 196~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY P&f!U' TUI~VZ'

r 5A~ra £ lArZ4L

r

Reuther

Delays Strike

SAIGON CONF"USION:
U.S. Embassy Denies Contact
With Any Viet Cong Members

At GM Until New Year,
Set CotatDaln

SAIGON R') - A high-rank- Friday edition said the Central
ing emissary from the Viet Cong's Intelligence Agency had invited a

DETROIT (P) - United Auto
Workers President Walter Reuther
yesterday agreed to hold off anyI
strike against the giant General
Motors Corp. until next year.-
Reuther emerged from a two-
hour meeting with the union's
GM Council and told newsmen
that a decision has been made
that would allow some 380,000
UAW - represented workers to
draw their Christmas and New
Year's holiday pay before they
might be called upon to walk off
the job.
The UAW leader said Dec. 14
has been set as a "target date"
for reaching a new national labor
contract with GM, the nation's
No. 1 automaker.
Strike Deadline
If no settlement is reached by
that date, Reuther said, the union
will then set a "strike deadline"
for sometime after the Christmas
and New Year holidays.
UAW strategy is aimed at ob-
taining an agreement on national
issues by mid-December, thus
freeing top union and company
negotiators to concentrate on set-
tlement of local disputes early
next year.
If there is no national agree-
ment by Dec. 14, then the 300-
member UAW-GM Council would
be summoned to another meeting
to set a strike deadline after the
holidays.

National Liberation Front has'
been arrested by South Vietnam-
ese police, informed sources re-{
ported yesterday.
Their 'account was that the:
emissary was on his way to a
meeting with U.S. Embassy offi-.
cials in Saigon. The embassy
denied this.
A member of South Vietnam's!

"high-ranking member of the
National Liberation Front to meet
with the Americans without in-
viting the GVN."
The paper said the U.S. gov-
ernment intervened to have the
NLF emissary released after he
had been arrested by Loan's men,
and that Loan refused the release
and tendered his resignation,

One of the original sources for
the reports, a person who is with-
in the Vietnamese police, said that
shortly after the Viet Cong repre-
sentative was arrested he told his
South Vietnamese interrogators in
effect that he was on an im-
portant mission to the Americans
and could not be arrested.
Vietnamese sources said that a
meeting actually had occurred in
Saigon in the past 10 days. They

f
A 1

.rl ,;.,h ....,.. «., a- .,.....,.,. -,.,a

House of Representatives, Phan whicn was not accepted said it inc
Xuan Huy, told the House that "If this is true, Loan deserves U.S. Missio
that U.S. Central Intelligence A- congratulations," the paper said. sentatives.
gency had been trying to set up - - - -

luded members of the
on and two NFL repre-

--Associated Press
BLACK POWER ADVOCATE, Stokely Carmichael, plans to return
to the U.S. after a speaking tour of foreign countries. Carmichael
made numerous speeches about the state of America's Black
Revolution while touring 13 countries, several of them communist.
Carmichael To End
TouReturn to U.S.

E
i
I
i
i

a contact with the National Liber-
ation Front without telling the
Saigon government.
He said the arrest of the Viet
Cong and U.S. Embassy pressure
on the national police director to
release the man, had led the dir-
ector, Brig. Gen. Nguyen Ngoc
Loan, to offer his resignation last
week.
Mission Unknown
There was no direct informationj
whether the emissary might have
been on a peace mission or in-
tended to discuss other matters
- possibly a prisoner exchange or
cease-fire periods at Christmas
and New Year's.
If a genuine approach to the
embassy was intended, it was the
first such that has become known.
The Associated Press f i r s "t
learned Thursday of various ac-
counts of the supposed approach
to the American mission. It sought
to check them out with the U.S.
Embassy before it sent any dis-
patches on it. Barry Zorthian,
minister-counselor for informa-
tion, responded that the embassy

U.S. Steel Increases Prices
Due to Decline in Earn'ing

-Associated Press
UAW PRESIDENT WALTER REUTHER, announced yesterday
. that a final strike deadline at General Motors would be post-
poned until after the holidys. Contract negotiations will begin
Dec. 16. At left is Leonard Woodcock, head of UAW negotation
team at GM.
CYPRUS CRISIS:
Las-iueDelay
Sn lags Peace als

UNITED NATIONS (MP) - UN
Secretary-General U Thant held
urgent conversations yesterday
with representatives of the United
States, Greece, Turkey and Cy-
prus on a', last-minute snag in a
planned peace appeal to end the
menacing crisis in the Eastern
Mediterranean.
U.S. Ambassador Arthur J.
Goldberg conferred, with Thant
for more than an hour yesterday
morning: The secretary - general
then called in Ambassadors Or-
han Eralp of Turkey, Dimitri S.
Bitsios of Greece and Zenon Ros-
sides of Cyprus for separate talks.
All three representatives of the
countries directly involved belit-
tled the difficulty.
Goldberg gave newsmen a terse
"no comment" after his meeting
with the secretary-general.
The appeal being worked out

by Thant was viewed as a face-
saving device for announcing the
agreement Vance had worked out
in an exhausting series of con-
ferences inhAnkara, Athens and
Nicosia. The appeal would cover
all points of the agreement, and,
under the plan, it would be
promptly accepted by the three
governments.
Although the terms of the
agreement have not been officially
disclosed, it is understood to call
for withdrawal of Greek and
Turkish troops above the levels
prescribed by the 1960 independ-
ence agreement on Cyprus-950
Greek soldiers and 650 from
Turkey.
Greek troops on the island now
are said to number between 8,000
and 12,000 and the Turkish forces
are estimated at 1,200 men.

GM Final Target
General Motors is the last of
the automotive Big Three to ne-
gotiate a new three-year contract
with the UAW. The industry pat-
tern for an economic settlement
was set in an agreement reached
with the Ford Motor Co. After a
50-day strike.
The Chrysler Corp. later set-
tled along the same lines, with
an additional provision aimed at
satisfying the union's demand for
parity of wages between workers
in the United States and Canada.
AFL-CIO Rift
Reuther coupled his announce-
ment of the union's GM bargain-
ing strategy with the disclosure
that he had sent a letter to
George Meany, AFL-CIO presi-
dent, expressing regret that UAW
officers would be unable to at-
tend a convention of the parent
labor organization in Miami next
week.
Reuther, .who has criticized
Meany's leadership and policies,
said key UAW officials would be
tied up in the auto negotiations.
The Ford strike, plus lengthy
Chrysler negotiations, threw the
UAW's timetable off schedule,
Reuther said.

After 40,000 miles or more, 13
countries and innumerable speech-
es to Communist audiences,-Black
Power advocate Stokely Car-
michael announced his odyssey
would end with his return to hell.
"I shall return to hell-that is,
the United States," said Carmi-
chael, according to a Swedish
translation of his remarks to the
press in Stockholm, the last stop
of his five months of travel.
The Stockholm remarks could be
considered mild, compared with
what Carmichael had to say else-
where to audiences of Communists
who lionized him. To them he was
more than just a Black Power ad-
vocate. He made himself champion
of guerrilla war in the United
States.
Advocates Violence
Carmichael's journey began in
July, his first stop England. The
Daily Sketch, calling for expulsion
of the 26-ytar-old visitor, quoted
him as telling a British audience:
"It is time to let the whites know
we are going to take over; if they
don't like it, we will stamp them
out, using violence and other
means necessary."
Carmichael left England for
Cuba and a conference of Latin-
American Communists weighing
prospects for hemisphere-wide re-
volution. The Communists included
the United States in calls for
"liberation struggle."
Presented by Havana to a news

conference, Carmichael announced
the Black Power movement was
directly linked with "liberation
struggles" everywhere."
"Armed struggle," he said, "is
today the only means of struggle
by the North American Negro. Our
movement is progressing toward
an urban guerrilla war within the
United States itself."
Negroes' problems, he said, could
not be solved "within a capitalist
society," and there should be "a
struggle for total revolution." For
this, Havana radio hailed him as
"the greatest North American
Negro leader." -E
War Crimes Tribunal
Carmichael said yesterday in
Stockholm that he agrees with Lord
Bertrand Russell's so-called war
crimes tribunal, which -has found
the United States guilty of geno-
cide in Vietnam.
Carmichael commented in Swe-
den: "After reading all the evi-
dence and after my visit to North
Vietnam, I would have voted 'yes'
on all counts."
The tribunal maintained the
United States has committed num-
erous war crimes in Vietnam, in-
cluding massacres of villagers and
torture of prisoners through elec-
tricity, burns, drowning and whip-
ping. It contended American sol-
diers usually supervised the torture
while South Vietnamese soldiers
carried it out.

had no
none.
After
cluding
lature
Saigon
bureau
day. A

comment and would have
Embassy Denial
further developments, in-
the speech in the legis-
and an account in the
press, the AP's Saigon
sent its first story Fri-
few hours later the em-

PITTSBURGH (A)-U.S. Steel
Corp., the nation's biggest steel-
maker, ordered a $5 a ton price in-
crease yesterday on sheets used in
a wide range of consumer products
from automobiles to household ap-
pliances.
U.S. Steel said it will raise prices
on cold rolled carbon steel sheets
and high-strength, low-alloy steel
Ey Pt Downs
Israeli Planes
BEIRUT, Lebanon (MP - Cairo
claimed Egyptian anti - aircraft
guns shot down three of four
Israeli jets that violated Egyptian
airspace yesterday at the south-
ern end of the Suez Canal.
An Israeli spokesman said only
one plane was downed. It had
been on a routine patrol.
An Egyptian broadcast com-
munique said three Israeli planes
hit by Egyptian fire fell in Israeli
held territory east of the canal
and the Gulf of Suez. It said all
three pilots bailed out and one
landed in the gulf.
It was the first clash reported
along the canal since the United
Nations Security Council adopted
a resolution for peace in the Mid-
dle East last week.
In Jerusalem, Prime Minister.
Levi Eshkol repeated Israeli as-
sertions that direct negotiations
with Arab states were the only
acceptable basis for a Middle East
peace. He said Israel was pre-
pared, meanwhile, to hold on to
Arab territories it occupied in the
war last June.

steets 3.4 per cent, effective Dec.
15.
Industry observers have' been
speculating on a major price in-
crease since October when steel
producers turned in dismal nine-
months earnings reports.
No reason for the increase was
given. U.S. Steel said the type of
sheets on which is. hiked prices
acount for 17.5 per cent of ship-
ments of all steel companies.
Bethlehem Steel Corp., the sec-
ond biggest producer, said it was
studying the U.S. Steel move, and
declined further comment. Repub-
lic Steel Corp. also declined imme-
diate comment.
General Motors and Ford Motor
Co. said they would have to study
the hike further to determine if it
will affect auto prices. Chrsyler
and American Motor s also were
studying the move, and General
Electric said tht same thing.
But if past patterns hold, they
can be expected to support the
price boost with similar increases
after assessing the reaction of gov-
ernment and customers.
Price increases earlier this year
drew only slight opposition from
Washington. But a government
spokesman warned after an in-
crease in steel plate prices, "The,
administration won't be keeping
its cool if sheet and strip steel go
up, too."

bassy issued a statement saying:
"Allegations about planned or
actual meetings between high of-
ficials of the U.S. Embassy and
representatives of the VC-NFL
as reported by The Associated
Press are false. The U.S. Em-
bassy would, of course, not un-
dertake any such contacts with-
out the knowledge of the govern-
ment of South Vietnam.
Huy's account to the House of
Representatives coincided with a
story printed by the Vietnamese-=
language newspaper, Song. Its

DIAL 8-6416
"A lusty, boldly,
provocative film."
LIFE MAGAZINE

U

Ticket Office Open Weekdays 10:00 - 1:00 and 2:00 - 5:00

g1ItY OUSK
THE MOTHERS
of INVENTION
FREE CONCERT!! ! !
Sunday, Dec. 3, 2 P.M.
by arrangement with Herb David
Suzie Creamcheese, won't you please come home?

=i

I

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION ,
FOX EASTERN THEATRES 0
375 No. MAPLE RD.-"769-1300
The glamour
and
grratne ...
The speed
and
spectacle!

Feature Times: Wed. 8:00 Only
fhurs.: 2:00, 5:15, 8:45

Once again the screen
explodes with rage,
passion and greatness!

1'

RIcHARD
PETER.{
OtOOLE
HAL WAIfl
PRODUCTION
#ECKET'
M" JO*TI"ILO

I

i

mTMO
IN SUPER PANAVISION' AND METROCOLO

L

I

'0
r GM

ti

COMING-
"Billy Liar" & "Lord of the Flies"

I

SATURDAY an
LA GRA
ILL US!

CATHLEEN VICTOR
NESBITT BUONO
IN
STUDS TERKEL'S
Scenery and Lighting by
ELDON ELDER
.Directed by
MARCELLA CISNEY

____- I
d SUNDAY
kNDE
ON
7 French, Subtitles
made in an attempt to
the French and the
en all Europe was pre-
enko's ARSENAL, it is
h the cinema has ever
ition of war." (Paul
s belief in people said,
C,0, k-._,,eA 1rnm

Mothers of Invention
PLUS
The AMBOY DUKES
AND
The MAGIC VEIL
LIGHT SHOW
SA DEC.2
2 SHOWS-7:00 and 10:00
SUN., DEC. 3-7:00 SHOW
NnC AF I IMIT F THFSF SHOWS

i

Dir. JEAN RENOIR, 193,
LA GRANDE ILLUSION was
awaken compassion between
German people, at a time wh
paring for war. Besides Dovj
"the most telling shaft whicF
directed against the institu
Rotha) Renoir, expressing his
"I .n e A nIA kIrF ,,iitv

i

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan