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November 28, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-28

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WAGE THREE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Greeks

To

Withdraw
m Cyprus,

BEGIN TALKS:
UAW To Attack
GM Automation

Troops fro

Accept Turkish Terms

ANKARA, Turkey ('P)-A politi- Turkey claims were stationed on

cal leader emerged from a meet-
ing with Premier Suleyman De-
mirel yesterday and said Greece
had accepted Turkey's basic de-
mands in the Cyprus crisis. He
added that only differences over
application of the agreement
remain.
Irfan Aksu, chairman of the
New Turkey party, said the
Greeks had agreed to the key
Turkish demand that Greece
withdraw some 12,000 troops

the Mediterranean island nation
in violation of the Zurich agree-
ment setting up the independent
Cyprus republic in 1960.
Aksu and other opposition lead-
ers met with Demirel during a
recess in a Cabinet meeting called
to discuss the latest Greek pro-
posals. Demirel had called in all
opposition leaders to get a na-
tional consensus.
Greece agreed to pay comoen-
sation for the 25 Turkish Cy-

Malaysia Race Riots
Bring Mass Arrests

p"]ots killed Nov. 15 in fighting
with Greek Cypriot forces at two
villages, Aksu added. This battlej
brought on the latest crisis.
Aksu said the Greeks had with-
drawn Gen George Grivas from
Cyprus. The Turks blamed Gri-
vas, a Greek who commands the
Cypriot armed forces, for the at-
tack on the villages and de-I
manded his ouster. He has beenl
in Athens since shortly after the
crisis erupted.
The latest Greek proposals were
brought to Ankara from Athens,1
by President Johnson's personal
envoy, Cyrus R. Vance.
He prepared to ieturn to Atnens
carrying Turkish answers to the
latest Greek proposals.
Remaining Grievances
Informed officials say the dis-
agreements which remain are a
matter of face-saving and tim-
ing. Though the substance of thei
negotiations are being kept secet,
they are believed to be:
-Which nation wizi make the
first move.
-How much tine will be al-
lowed Gi eece to withdraw its
troops from Cyprus.
Turkey has insisted all along
that Greece make the first move.
One unconfirmed report was that
Greece had offered to withdraw
troops in three months.

-Associated Press
LEVELS ACCUSATION
Comptroller General Elmer Staats charged yesterday before a Senate-House subcommittee that the
government is losing millions because defense contractors use government-owned equipment for pri-
vate work without authorization.
De Gaulle Blasts U.S. Policies,
Brtish Bid for ommon Mt

E
i
a
i
j
t
I
_

DETROIT (P') - The United
Auto Workers, with Ford and1
Chrysler new contracts all wrap-1
ped up, moved on to General Mo-J
tors yesterday with indications'
that automation and use of com-
puters would be major problems.
UAW officials distributed a 24-
page release in which they ac-
cused GM of trying to remove
some auto jobs from UAW cate-
gory by putting them into com-
puterized fields with white collar,
nonunion workers.
Bargaining
Setting the battle line for
some anticipated hardnosed bar-
gaining, the UAW told GM:
"The union never has com-]
plained of automation. In fact, iti
has staunchly defended automa-f
tion, often in spite of member-t
ship disbelief that automation isl
good for the economy and the
total community.4
"The union cannot continue to
defend it if it coupled with con-
tinuous displacement and erosion
of the union with the new method
arbitrarily assigned to salary."
GM vice president of labor re-
lations Louis G. Seaton had told
newsmen earlier yesterday as he
emerged from a preliminary meet-
ing with the UAW that he was
optimistic.
Hard Work
GM's spokesman added that
with "hard work and a realistic
attitude by both parties these ne-
gotiations+ can reach a successfull
conclusion."
Seaton said he expected it
would take until early next year
to resolve all local issues at GM's
plants. Currently, some 18,000
such unsolved issues remain from
an original agenda of 31,000, he
reported.
GM's No. 1 labor troubleshooter

also disclosed that the nation's
biggest auto firm had submitted
to the UAW earlier this month
proposed language of pensions,
insurance and supplemental un-
employment benefits which he
said were similar to the language
in she Ford and Chrysler con-
tracts.
World News
Roundup
NEW YORK - The Columbia
Broadcasting System reported yes-
terdaw that Charles F. Frankel,
assistant secretary of state for
educational and cultural affairs,
has resigned in protest against
President Johnson's Vietnam poli-
cies.
The 50 - year - old philosopher
and author has headed the State
Department's Bureau of Educa-
tional and Cultural Affairs for
two 'years and three months.
Frankel, however, declined to
comment on reports that he is
stepping out as a result'of differ-
ences with President Johnson and
Secretary of State Dean Rusk on
U.S. policy in Vietnam.
BOGOTA, Colombia-Four chil-
dren died of poisoning yesterday,
bring to 80 the death toll in the
weekend disaster at Chiquinquira,
where insecticide called parathion
became mixed with flour used for
baking bread.
* .* *
LISBON, Portugal-- The death
toll that struck west-central Por-
tugal has risen to 316, the Interior
Ministry announced last night.

PENANG, Malaysia (P--Police
made mass arrests yesterday in an
effort to break up leftists and
gangster-type Chinese secret so-
cieties accused of triggering three
days of racial riots in Malaysia.
Curfews were imposed in Penang
and the capital, Kuala Lumpur,
180 miles south of here, after riot-
ing between Malays and Chinese
beginning Friday took 11 lives and
left nearly 200 injured, 93 seri-
ously.
Many Arrested
The government reported 419
persons, including about 300 Chi-
nese, have been arrested through-
out Malaysia under the Internal
Security Act, which provides for
indefinite imprisonment without
trial. Another 270 were detained
as curfew violators.
In Penang and the neighboring
mainland port of Butterworth, po-
lice arrested 295 persons, including
191 Chinese and 78 Malays.
In Kuala Lumpur, where police
credited the mass arrests with pre-

venting a general strike, 106 per-
sons, including 99 Chinese, were
detained. Eighteen persons were
arrested elsewhere in Malaysia.
Tun Abdul Razak, deputy prime
minister, told a news conference
in Kuala Lumpur that 22 homes,
two shops and a factory had been
burned in the riots in Penang and
Butterworth over the weekend.
He proclaimed the security situ-
ation "well under control" in Pe-
nang and Kuala Lumpur.
Attacks Labor Party
Razak devoted most of his news
conference to an attack on the
left-wing Labor party, whose top
leaders have been arrested, ac-
cusing them of instigating the ra-
cial riots.
He said numerous subversive
documents, including books con-
taining thoughts and speeches of
Red China's party Chairman Mao
Tse-tung had been found in party
offices in Kuala Lumpur and Pe-
nang.
He said one poster urged that
Prime Minister Tunku Abdul Rah-
man be hanged.
In Penang, police said their ar-
rests included 84 members of the
Chinese secret societies.
Confiscate Weapons
Police confiscated an arsenal of
weapons, including spears, long
sword-like knives known as par-
angs, slingshots with metal ball
bearing missiles and steel hooks
from members' homes. These types
of weapons were used during the
riots.
Razak said similar weapons also
were found in the leftist Labor
party offices in Kuala Lumpur.
Thousands of steel-helmeted
riot police and soldiers armed with
rifles patrolled the streets of Kuala
Lumpur, some in armored person-
nel carriers. But as a general strike
called by leftists fizzled out, most
of the' security units were with-
drawn to outlying areas.

PARIS (/P)-Charles de Gaulle
attacked the United States dur-
ing his 16th semi-annual news
conference yesterday and declared
Britain still isn't"ready for entry
into the . European C o m m o n
Market even though the British
government has taken steps for
financial order.
Hitting at the United States,
the 77-year-old French president
demanded a halt to what he call-
ed the abuse of U.S. industrial

penetration of Europe into in- since he returned to power in 1958
flated dollars. And once more he -gave De Gaulle the opportunity
blamed the lack of a peace settle- to present his first public reac-
ment in the Middle East on the tion to Britain's devaluation of
"odious" war in Vietnam. the pound sterling Nov. 18 from
U.S. officials in Washington $2.80 to $2.40. Britain devalued in
said there would be no comment hopes of strengthening its finan-
on De Gaulle's remarks made at cial situation.
one of his elaborately staged De Gaulle contended Britain's
semiannual news conferences. entry now into the Common
In London, British officials Market would wreck it.
said De Gaulle's criticism would "The present Common Market
not lead to withdrawal of the ap- is incompatible with the British
plication for membership for a economy the way it is," he said.
place among the six members of "A radical transformation is need-
the present Common Market. ed for Britain to be able to melt
"We formally applied to six into the Continent.".
nations for membership," one of-
ficial said. "We await a reply from To even begin negotiations, De
six nations" lGaulle said, would be to give ad-
De Gaulle needled Canada once vance approval for breaking up
again by renewing his appeals for the European community.
French - Canadian separation, a
stand that created a storm when
he visited French-speaking Que-
bec Province last summer.
Canadian Prime Minister Lester
B. Pearson, visiting in London, re-,

Moss Blasts. Draft Policy,
Demands Hershey Resign

WASHINGTON A) -The dis-
pute between Rep. John E. Moss
and Lt. Gen. Lewis B. Hershey
flarea again yesterday when the
California Democrat rejected the
draft director's defense of his ac-
tions and called again for Her-
shey's resignation.
"Your response further sup-
ports my opinion that you are no
longer fit to serve as the director
of the Selective Service System,"
Moss told Hershey in a letter
dated Nov. 22 and released yes-
terday.
Tells Hershey To Resign
Moss, who heads the House gov-
ernment information subcommit-
tee, had told Hershey in a Nov.
17 letter that he should resign for
recommending to local draft
boards that they remove exemp-
tions of students involved in an-
tidraft demonstrations.
Moss had criticized Hershey
earlier for refusing to make public

the names of local draft board
members.
In making his new attack on
Hershey Moss made public a Nov.
21 letter he received from Hershey
in which the draft director argued
his aption carries nut the man-

date
"I
the
this
that
have
chtic
the r
tive
Hers
Hes
i
the
to a
the
such
port,
state
Rive
ed S
Hers

ofU1 Congress.fused direct comment on that De
believe that had you taken Gaulle remark but said Canada's
trouble to have looked into problems "are our problems, to be
terb youwou have ond solved by us and not by outside
matter you would have found Intreto n ordmsi
all the questions that you ntervention in our domestic
raised were resolved by spe- affairs."
actions of the Congress in De Gaulle in effect vetoed Bri-
ecent extension of the Selec- tain's immediate entry into the
Service induction authority," Common Market by refusing to
hey wrote. approve negotiations on its appli-
'Guided by Congress' cation for membership. "As sweet
added that in administering as dreams are," he said, "realities
draft law "I must be guided are there."
large extent by the intent of De Gaulle blackballed the Brit-
Congress" as gathered from ish when they first applied in
things as the committee re- 1963. Membership requires the
floor debate and a Nov. 16 unanimous approval of all six
ment by Chairman L. Mendel market nations - France, West
rs 'D-SC) of the House Arm- Germany, Italy, the Netherlands,
ervices Committee endorsing Belgium and Luxembourg.
hey's directive. The news conference-his 16th

PRESIDENT ABDUL RAHMAN

Ticket Office Open Weekdays 10:00 - 1:00 and 2:00 - 5:00

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r A WONDERFUL GIFT for a
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Select from our large assortment of shapes,
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16 NICKELS ARCADE
Americans for Democratic Action
pre.sents
CONGRESSMAN
JOHN CONYERS
(Democrat, Detroit)
speaking on
"LIBERAL ACTION PROGRAMS
FOR 1968"

I

I

I

CATHLEEN VICTOR
NESBITT BUONO
IN
STUDS TERKEL'S
Scenery and Lighting by
ELDON ELDER
Directed by
MARCELLA CISNEY

I

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OAJL.u./r Mv . r- 1111

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