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November 28, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-28

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. WM9

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TT7r,4ZInAV VnV'PIMMWV ot t6&r4

,.E M.CIGA. 1 TIN 'T'' 11 T AY l4 i54 #.1 ' a

I

theatre-
Revolutionary Tiet Rock' Uses

TO HEAD WORLD BANK:
McNamara Resigns from Post

CATHLEEN NESBITT

VICTOR BUONO

Director Lands Stars

Exciting, I
By ANDREW LUGG
One of the most exciting things
in the theatre today is that the
old notion of "character" is being
done away with. The Civic The-
atre, for example, is conducting
some experiments in which one
actor plays a number of roles.
This is a technique which has
been thoroughly investigated by
New York director Joseph Chaik-
in and the Open Theatre. "Viet
Rork," written by Megan Terry,
is being presented at the Ftith
Dimension and was developed into
its present (script) form by the
Open Theatre.
Now, Alan Schreiber, who di-
rects this Ann Arbor production,
has gone even further in elimi-
nating "character." "Viet RoeK
is worth seeing just to witness
this exciting new theatrical tech-
nique. But also for other reasons!
Now, that is what I like: new
ways of i-resenting material; new
ideas; actors just "doing their
bit;" no pretentions, . enjoying
acting, smiling as they play out
their parts.
"Viet Rock" is really the "folk-
rock movie" that Megan Terry
claims it to be. That is to say that
the movement between scenes is
as though the play had been
edited or cut like a film.
That is to say that it is like
a collage of human beings.
That is to say that if you were
to draw a picture of these move-
ments they would look like spirals

(Continued from Page 1)
member states-since 1946 and isi
Oriinal echniques currently lending at a level of
about $1 billion a year.1
The bank's president receives a
Something happens on one side "Billy C and the Sunshines" tax free salary of $40,000 a year,
of the theatre Buddhist "funeral ritual, and straight drama, and customarily lives in Washing-
service:" cut to the other side, The final cry of "who, who, ton where the bank is located.
Hanoi Hannah: "Good evening, who, ...".lifted romantically In the past, rumors of McNa-1
Yankee imperialists. How goes our from T. S. Eliot sums up the mara's leaving have been firmly
tiny battle today?" whole thing. denied. But yesterday there was
The structure is complex and Who are the villains? Who's re- "no comment" from the White
sophistinated; it was very diffi- sponsible? Who knows what to House press secretary GeorgeI
cult for me to feel simply like a do? No, these aren't the questions. Christian and from the Defense
protestor-throwing up my arms When I left it was me that had Department public affairs spokes-
at the horror of the war. been knocked down, not MacBird man.'
I would guess that a hawk or The Egg of Head. That is, it Said Christian: "I have no in-t
would find it difficult to reject gets down to the "nitty-gritty." formation on that report." He'
this play :n terms of polemics. A wt.T d on Ian Bannan, who promised to raise the matter with
Because this is just what "Vet plays Wetmoreland, a sergeant, President Johnson but indicated no
Rock" is not about. To be sure it and ether sundry parts: excel- quick response was likely.
is a sustained explosion of venom lent. ------ -- -
directed at the powers that be. A word about the direction: ONLY 4 MORE DAYS
But its revolutionary qualities first-rate. TO SEE ULYSSES
lie elsewhere. It refuses even to "Viet Rock" works because a) it
pesk in the politician's language. is good theatre, b) it means some- t"A SUPERB
Unlike "MacBird," which after all thing, c) it means something to FILM! ft"ue Magaztn.
was a bit of a drag, "Viet Rock" the actors and d) they do a good
does not rely very heavily n2 job on the play.,,
satire. This is all to say that people ,
Certainly, that's it. The satire shouldn't be reading reviews about FORCEFUL
is, however, splendidly mixed in -"Viet .Rock." They should be down I
with mime, music (played here by there seeing it. CINEMA ART.
________ _-Bosley Crowther.New York Times

For nearly seven years, Mc-
Namara has borne the physical
and psychological burdens of
managing the biggest military
establishment in the world, an'
institution with 4.5 million em-?
ployes, a budget of more than $80
billion, and a nuclear arsenal
that could devastate the earth.
The job has required of him a
heavy work schedule - 12 to
18 hours a day, six to seven days
a week.
There have been repeated in-
dications, also, that McNamara
differed with President Johnson
and other influential Pentagon
military advisers on Vietnam war
strategy.
He has held the job longer thanj

anyone in history and has seeme(
less b:eyant lately than Y.hen he
entered rhe Pentagon in January
1961 as a 41-year-old financial
"Whiz Kid" from the Ford Motor
Co.
In a conversation with a friend
some time ago, the Post said,
McNamara remarked that if he
were to leave the Defense Depart-
ment he would never "go in a
huff" but would make a quiet
departure.
The formal term of the bank's
current president, George D.
Woods, expires at the end of this
year. But he has an interim ap-
pointment to serve an additional
year unless a successor is named
earlier.

I

if

4

Of 'Amazi
By LISSA MATROSS
"What we have here is one vet-
eran, a grande dame of the thea-
tre, and one rising new star . . .
and they're both so flexible!"
The "grande dame" that Mar-
cella Cisney was referring to is
Cathleen Nesbitt, distinguished
British actress. The "rising star" is
Victor Buono, Oscar nominee for
"Whatever Happened to Baby
Jane?"
Miss Cisney will direct the two
in Studs Terkel's play "Amazinga
Grace," the 1967 New Play Project
to be presented by Robert C.
Schnitzer and the Professional;
Theatre Program, Dec. 5-10.
In a press conference held yes-1
terday, Miss Cisney stressed the,
accessibility of the cast, "With a
new work," she said, "the actor
must have his pores open, artist-
ically speaking."
Miss Nesbitt, a member of the
original Abbey Players in Dublin,,
is an old hand at "new works,"
and was in the original cast of T.
S. Eliot's "The Cocktail Party."
She commented that from the ac-,
tor's standpoint, "new works are
far more interesting than the clas-
sics in that there are no inhibiting
precedents."
Buono concurred, noting "there
ORGANIZATION ]
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
room 1011 SAB.
- Bach Club meeting; lecture-recital
by Robert Clark on symbolism in the
chorale preludes of the Orgelbuchlein,'
Wed., Nov. 29, 7:45 p.m., meet at Guild
House, 802 Monroe, at 7:30 p.m. for1
transportation. Meeting is Dr. Mason's
studio, 2110 School of Music
Concert Dance Organization is hold-
ing modern dance classes every Tues.,-t
7:30 p.m. and Thurs. at 8:15 p.m. at,
the Barbour Gym Dance Studio. Classes
are held for men on Tues. at 7:30 p.m.
* s* *
Communication Sciences Lecture
Series presents Dr. Joyce Friedman,
Stanford U.: "Directed Random Gen-t
eration of Sentences," Tues. Nov. 28,
4:10, Michigan Union.
* * *
Graduate Assembly, general meeting,
Wed. Nov. 29, 7:30 p.m., East Con-
ference Room (4th floor), Rackham
Bldg. * * *
Bldg.
Libertarian League-Ayn Rand So-
ciety, meeting, Thurs., Nov. 30, 8 p.m.,1
3-B Union. The program will includei
a discussion of the draft and a re-
cording of one of Miss Rand's lectures.
Everyone is welcome,
** *
College Republican Club, meeting toi
discuss open housing, Wed., Nov. 29.
7:30 p.m., Union 3S. Also executive
board meeting, Tues. Nov. 28, 7:00 p.m.,
2535 SAB.

Sng Grace'
is no one to tell us we haven't got
it right." This is Buono's first ap-
pearance in a new play.
Other new play projects staged
by Miss Cisney include "An Eve-
ning's Frost," by Donald Hall and
John Hersey's "The Child Buyer."
In 1961, the PTP produced "We
Comrades Three," a story of Walt
Whitman. "It was a dismal fail-
ure," said Miss Cisney, "but we
have a right to fail. We don't want
to get caught up in a 'success syn-
drome.' We don't feel, however,
that Terkel's play will fail."
"Amazing Grace" was one of the
300 plays submitted annually to
the PTP. It was sent to the group
by Audrey Wood, who is the "dean
of literary managers" according to
Miss Cisney. Miss Wood discovered
Tennessee Williams and fosters
the works of William Inge and
Robert Anderson who has written
"Tea and Sympathy" and "You
Know I Can't Hear You When the
Water's Running."
"When we first received the
play," said Miss Cisney, "itwas
sprawling and diffuse, but there
was something in this amorphous
structure that demanded hearing.
It is a cry from the heart that pro-
tests an urban society that deforms
its inhabitants.
Terkel, know locally in Chicago
for his WFMT radio programs and
nationally for his recent book
"Division Street: America," has
described the play as "my quarrel
with a cool antagonist, indiffer-
ence. The air of impersonality per-
vades our society. I find this ap-
palling and terrifying. I suppose
you might call the play both a cry
and a warning.
"It's a cry for help-help for feel.
A warning that Orwell may be just
around the corner. Literally, the
play is about an elderly woman
(Cathleen Nesbitt) and her two
boys-one being her true passion-
ate nature (Buono), the other her
contemporary pose (Mart Huls-
wit) ."
Miss Cisney terms Terkel "a
humanist who fears that modern
society is squeezing the juice out
of people. To Studs, the cool by-
stander in contemporary life signi-
fies only an aid to the dehuman-
izing process."
The name "Amazing Grace,"
comes from a Baptist-Methodist
hymn: "Amazing grace, how sweet
thy sound/that saved a wretch like
me/I once was lost but now am
found/I was blind but now I see."
But Studs Terkel has not written
a religious revival. Rather, he is
offering a frightening social com-
mentary full of black humor. It is
a warning.

- STARTING WEDNESDAY -

I

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times like broken ptraignt

Tonight
VIET ROCK
5th Dimension-8:30
COMING
SOON
(you should live so long)
A Jewish Style
DELICATESSEN
THE
DELI
Corner of N. Main and Miller
TAKE OUT
FREE DELIVERY
THIS WEEK
Thursday and Friday
GREED
dir. Erich Von Stroheim
Filmed in 1924 from
Frank Norris muckraker,
"McTeague;" about
money and its power to
corrupt.
Saturday and Sunday
GRAND
ILLUSION
dir. Jean Renoir, 1937
French, subtitles
About belief in people
and their intrinsic good.
"I made La Grande
Illusion because

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Ladies admitted for 60c T to 6 P.M.

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Part Alfie
very funny!
laugb about

"Hilarity Romp"n
-N.Y. Post

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
for the
DEPT OF SPEECH PRODUCTION

IE.PAVL BELMOMDO I
tender scoundrel

of
OLcERE' comedy
I[NT[EUAN.I

. ~vIw..
3

of,

'A GORGEOUS
PIECE OF
FILM-MAKINGI
- SATURDAY RVEW

cMUM8IA P ES EENS
*T'TYl NIHITIN
BEST ACTRESS"9

A VERY FRENCH FARCE
WED.-SAT., NOV. 29-- DEC. 2, 8 P.M.
ALSO
SUNDAY MATINEE, DEC. 3
2:30 p.m.

wawlrl'*,

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