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November 21, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-21

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVE ER;21. 1967

PAGE TWQ THE MICUh(~N UlAIJY TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 21. 1~7

A V"/1 Uta1t 411 1 U1 LLLlY / at IL47Vo

poetry and prose

beginners'

Efforts Display

A Professor's Life:
They Keep Him Busy

Promise in 'Generation'

By ROBERT L. STILWELL
- Assistant Professor of English E
W. H. Auden, in the only pro-4
nouncement of his that I havet
ever found memorable, invites uss
to believe that so far as the art of
literature is concerned "A begin-
ner's efforts cannot be called badE
or imitative. They are imaginary."
This-says-or at least it ought to
say-that such efforts deserve im-
munity from the scrutiny of crit-1
ieism; because their only true ex-
istence is confined to that limbo
- of privacy and half-innocence1
wherein one presses one's firstY
x trial-and-error struggles with ex-f
perience and imagination and lan-1
guage, one's first raids upon the1
inarticulate.
As might be expected, the cur-a
rent number of "Generation"
brings its share of pages that were
perhaps not quite ready to emerge
from that protective limbo. Still,
the assay of such pages is not par-
ticularly high; and for the most1
part this "Generation" displays a5
promise, and an occasional touchj
of achievement, that make the
magazine worth almost anybody's
fifty cents..
Fiction
Fiction probably constitutes the
:strong suit of the present issue.1
There are only two stories; but al-i
though neither of them is as yet,
really achieved, really "written,"
they testify to the talents of their
authors.I
In "Raising Grandma," Keewat-
in Dewdney imagines a half-liter-1
ate servant boy in the backwoods
Canada of the nineteenth century1
and allows him to narrate a partlys
,comc, partly grotesque account of
the local witch-man's quack efforts
to save the life of an eighty-year-
old woman who would much prefer
to die and be rid of her miseries.
Edward Germain's "The Search"
makes an effort, sometimes suc-1
cessful, to get inside the eyes and
mind of a young boy who has beenf
dragooned; along with hordes of
"other schoolchildren, into joining
the search for a missing woman
who has been beaten to death in a
:stretclh of lonely country.
Grad Library
Power Fails
Electricity failed in the General
Library yesterday afternoon caus-
Ing a sixty-five minute blackout:
~fiom 2:50 to 3:55 p.m.
Students in the library, however,
continued to study by flashlight
and windowlight. The rate of books
being taken out of the libary de-
creased by about half for the rest
of the day, library officials report.
Immediately as the blackout oc-
curred, library workers were told
'not to "render any services "unless
it is an emergency." Employes
with'flashlights were stationed at
the entrances to the stacks and
'instructed to clear everyone out
of the stacks and not let anyone
In.' Students on the second floor,
however, continued to use the card
catalogue with flashlights and en-
tered the stacks at places where
no one was guarding the entrance.
A library worker, describing the
reaction of students as the black-
out occurred, said, "The lights
went out and they just pressed
their noses harder to their books."
p -

There are several attractive
poems, too. Joel Greenberg's "An-
chor" and "A January Song" con-
tain a number of sure touches;
and Michael Madigan redeems two
uncertain pieces ("Veronica" and
"Stalled") with two others ("The
Rites of Love" and "A Brother of
Two Months") that are very good
indeed. I must confess myself dis-
appointed with "Fly" by Mark
Lehman and, to a lesser extent,
with "Charitas" by Michael Davis.
Fritz Lyon's one-act play "The
Machine" is still another parody
not without its moments of inter-
est, c*. the Waiting-for-Godot,
Modern - Man - Destroyed - By -
His - Technology - And - By -
The - Collapse - Of - Meaning
strain within recent drama.
"Search for Realism"
Andrew Lugg's essay "Reality in
Two Dimensions," which he
characterizes as "a , search for
realism in modern art," is an ex-
position of certain assumptions
and techniques by which contem-
porary painting, sculpture, cine-
matography, poetry, and fiction
have sought to discover fresh
images of "reality.". Lugg con-
veys, convincingly enough, the
impression that he is right in
there, on top of the latest artistic
activities of Allain Robbe-Grillet
Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschen-
berg, Anthony Caro, Ellsworth
Kelly, Robert Creeley, and a whole
host .of other experimentors. One
never doubts, in short, that he
knows where it's at; and readers
who desire some kind of chart
to the avant-garde landscape
should profit from Lugg's piece.'
For readers already familiar
with the territory, the essay will
probably sound like rather stale
news. Moreover, I fear that
readers of both classes are likely
to be put off by Lugg's creaking
transitions and shaky paragraph-
ing, by his pompous preference
for the editorial "we," by his habit
of referring to his own writings
published elsewhere, and by his
giving credence (on two different

pages) to that hoariest of all
historical half-truths about art:
"With the advent of photography,
painting was liberated from its
self-imposed task of description
Peter Griffith's "Catena" - a
suite for guitar, in five brief
movements - is a capable piece
of new music, one likely to sound
strangely conservative to per-
formers or listeners who have
tussled with the graphed-field
scores of John Cage, Morton Feld-
man, and Karlheinz Stockhausen.
Photographs
About the folio of photographs
by George Junne and Robert Ath-
anasiou, the lithographs by Pat-
ricia Oleszko, and the line-drawing
by Rowan Murphy, I can offer
only the most untutored and im-
pressionistic judgments. Junne 's
views of the City Hall' in Toronto
yield some easy-to-grasp, tepidly
unoriginal insights into a dizzy-
ing steel-and-concrete imperson-
ality of curves, angles, and planes.
Athanasiou's work seems slight-
ly more inventive and en-
gaging, especially his sea-birds
on a log of driftwood and his
head-on study of a zebra's face.
I am sorry to report that I
found Miss Oleszko's lithographs,
and Miss Murphy's Steinberg-
influenced drawing, almost totally
without appeal - although they
were happier choices for the maga-
zine than its cover-drawing.
Were I compelled to summarize
my over-all feelings about this
Autumn, 1967 number of "Gener-
ation," I would suggest that the
majority of its contributors have
not as yet understood that saddest
and most intractable of all artis-
tic lessons: "The lyf so short,
the craft so longe to lerne."
But I would also hasten to add
that several of its, contributors
have made, are making, a begin-
ning in the direction of this dif-
ficult understanding. Something
further may come of their admir-
able energy and enterprise; and
I, for one, enthusiastically hope
that it does.

(Continued from Page 1)
the least about. "After all, I need
some time to work on my own re-
search,, and those meetings always
take up so much of it."
But, more than likely, Prof. Ten-
tler will learn. As an assistant pro-
fessor, not yet under the wing of
The Great God Tenure and rela-
tively new to the ups and downs
of University bureaucracy, the
meetings have just begun.
Marvin Felheim, a full professor
in the English department, came
to Ann Arbor 19 years ago and has
had more than his share of meet-
ings. Having served on committees
ranging from SACUA's Student
Relations Committee to the execu-
tive committee of the English de-
partment, Felheim can speak from
experience.
"Committees are an obligation
that the faculty has to the Uni-
versity," he explains.
The committees that men like
Tentler and Felheim serve on ad-
dress themselves to everything
from the selection of new deans to
arbitration of student-faculty dif-
ferences. They're often the kind
of affair that is closed to students,
and Felheim has a "hey, buddy,
let me tell you something" attitude
when the topic turns to their
closed-door nature.
Damn Boring
"Strategically, for the admin-
istration, it actually would be best
to keep the meetings open. They're
so damn boring, the students would
lose interest immediately."
Of course, the professor's life
doesn't end in the classroom or at
the conference table. Felheim de-
votes his mornings to class prep-
aration, something he feels is one
of the most critical jobs a professor
performs.
"There is nothing worse than a
lecturer who comes in and reads
off of yellowed notes," Felheim in-
sists. "I remember when I was a
student and had to listen to lec-
tures that were three years out of
date."
So the early-rising Felheim sec-
rets himself away each day to put
together a new lecture. "But never
in my office; I wouldn't get any-
thing done."
When he is in his office, how-

ever, he keeps the door open, and
finds himself talking with a coed
about her pregnancy as much as
her pentameters. The few hours a
week he devotes to office hours
prove to be a running, uninterrupt-
ad conversation with his students,
something else he sees as a pro-
fessor's obligation. But, he admits
frankly, he enjoys it.
There are a number of other
functions that necessarily fall into
the professor's pattern. Just as
Tentler, an assistant professor,
supervises a group of graduate
teaching fellows, Felheim and oth-
ers of his rank supervise the as-
sistant professors; the make-up of
any department is almost as struc-
tured as a corporate entity.
Publish or Perish
And professors write, too. The
"publish or perish" legend is no
cliche. Faculty members at a
school like the University are re-
quired to turn out scholarly ma-
terial, and there is a reasonable
justification.
"Academic departments at ma-
jor universities are national de-
partments. The criteria are uni-
versal, and for every deducible
reason, you've got to publish," Fel-
heim says.
When a school is trying to at-
tract the best students and the big-
gest foundation grants, it has to
have a noteworthy 'reputation to
boast. And, a faculty member's
published works are the only avail-
able determinants of reputation.
Students may all love a professor
for being a stimulating, exciting
teacher, -but this is the kind of
information that never makes it
off this campus and onto other
campuses, or into the offices of the
Ford Foundation.
Then there are the PhD commit-
tees to chair, the local speaking
engagements to attend, the grad-
uate school recommendations to
write, even the faculty parties on
Saturday nights.
And by the time one week is out,
a new one is beginning. Cram it
all into the trimester system-
something openly abhorred by
most of the University faculty-
and you can see what they're get-
ting paid for.

Ac
ANN ARBOR-Educators, jour-
nalists, and scholars will gather at
The University of Michigan next
week for a three-day conference on
the contemporary college student'
and the liberal arts in education.
Entitled "The College Student-
1967," the program is set up as a
series of panel discussions begin-
ning at 3 p.m. Tuesday through
Thursday (Nov. 28-30) in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
Tuesday's dicussions will focus
on "The Student as Citizen."
Panelists will be Stanley Swinton,
assistant general manager of The
Associated Press; Michael Dann,
CBS-TV's senior vice president for
programs, and Roger Rapoport,
editor of The Michigan Daily.
"The Personal Life of the Stu-
dent" will be the second day's.
topic. Panelists will be Dr. Willard
Dalrymple, health service director
of the McCosh Infirmary, Prince-
ton University; Robert O. Schultze,
dean of the college at Brown Uni-
versity, and Prof. Theodore N.
Newcomb, social psychologist and
associate director of U-M's Resi-
dential College.
The program will close Thursday
with a consideration of "The
Image of the Student: The Gen-
eration Gap." Participating in the
discussion will be Jack Holland,
dean of students at The University
of Texas; Roy Ashm all, president
of U-M's Graduate Assembly, and
Bruce Kahn, president of the U-M
Student Government Council.
The Michigan Consort of Voices,
Viols, and Other Historic Instru-
ments will give a concert of seldom
performed music of earlier cen-
turies on Tuesday, Nov. 28.
The Collegium Musicum pro-
gram, directed by Robert Austin
Warner, will begin at 8:30 p.m. in
Recital Hall of the U-M School

ross Campus
of Music on North Campus. It is lems in nuclear test detection,
open to the public free of charge. while at the same time serving, as
On the program will be compo- acting head of U-M's Acoustics
sitions by the Sermisy, Mico, Pur- and Seismics Laboratory.
cell, Dowland, da Viadana, Quantz, * * *
and Handel. ' The University of Michigan Col-
* * * lege of Engineering, which ranks
James R. Thiry, who has been fifth in the total number of en-
named manager of employe and gineering degrees conferred by U.S.
union relations in The University Cole-es, has 4.351 students enrolled

4

of Michigan Personnel Office, will
be the chief negotiator for the
University in upcoming collective!
bargaining.
Personnel Officer Russel W.
Reister, in announcing Thiry's pro-
motion, said that the "dual nature
of the title, employe and union re-
lations, reflects the University's
continuing efforts and programs in
the interests of staff members who
are not represented by union bar-
gaining agents."
* * *
The U.S. Interior Department
has named U-M Prof. John M. De'
Noyer assistant director of the U.S.
Geological Survey. He is currently
on leave from the faculty.
Dr. De Noyer joined the U-M of
geology and mineralogy in 1957. In
1962-63 he was employed by the
Institute for Defense Analyses. He
served as a consultant to the in-
stitute from 1963 to 1965 to make
special studies on difficulty prob-

for the fall of 1967.
According to Associate Dean
Alen E. Hellwarth, there are 1,205
graduate and 3,326 undergraduate
students enrolled. Of the graduate
students, 451 are doctoral candi-
dates and 754 master's degree
candidates.
Freshman enrollment has
creased slightly to 818, compare:,
with 782 in fall 1966.
The college's statistics also show
that 238 bachelor's degrees were
presented in April of this year and
114 in August.
A U.S. Office of Education re-
port, which ranks the U-M fifth in
engineering degrees conferred, also
shows the U-M third in the num-
ber of bachelor's degrees, seventh
in master's degrees, and fifth in
doctoral degrees.
Purdue is first in bachelor's de-
grees awarded and Massachusetts
Institute of Technology is first in
both master's and doctoral degre

TEN NITES STARTING FRIDAY
SUNDAYS TOO, MAT. & NITE

un 4-1200-06

MONGO

SANTA MARIA

LIVERNOIS & 8 MILE

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BAKER'S KEYBOARD

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