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November 15, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-15

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15 196:

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

House Rebuffs
Plan to Change
Poverty Program

I WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
California Delays Executions
Pending State Court Decision

WASHINGTON (A)-The House
continued yesterday to rebuff at-
tempts to revise the Johnson ad-
ministration's antipoverty pro-
gram.
A proposal to shift work and
training programs for the poor
from the Office of Economic Op-
portunity to other federal agencies
was defeated 169 to 108 on a party
line vote.
Democrats then turned down 140
Philppines
Vote Marred
By -Violence
MANILA (P) - Candidates of
President Ferdinand E. Marcos'
Nacionalista party led in impor-
tant Senate contests Tuesday as
early returns were counted fol-
lowing one of the Philippines'
most violently contested national
elections.
The national constabulary said
seven persons were slain. But a
spokesman said the voting was
"less bloody than expected."
Although there appeared to be
no widespread terrorism, 25,000
troops were on the alert.
Most of the violence occurred
in the provinces away from Ma-
nila. In Pampanga, a mayoral
candidate, a municipal councilor
and another politician were re-
ported shot to death. Two gov-
ernmhent election officials were
killed and four wounded in an
ambush in Ilocos Sur.
Philippine News Service said 24
persons have been killed since
election eve and put the total
slaying during the political sea-
son at 97. Thirty-three were killed'
before the 1965 election that put
Marcos in power.
In the important race for may-
or of Manila, Liberal incumbent
Antonio Villegas, who once tried
to ban American retailers from
the city, claimed re-election. Re-
turns had him leading over Pablo
Ocampo, a Nacionalista.
About 80 per cent of the coun.
try's eight million voters turned
out to choose the senators, 65
governors and nearly 14,000 pro-
vincial and municipal officials.
Debate focused on domestic pro-
grams and Marcos' pro-Western
foreign policy, including the
sending of 2,000 troops to Viet-
nam, was not an issue.

to 104 another GOP amendment
that would have established an on-
the-job training program in pri-
vate industry with the federal gov-
ernment paying 25 per cent of the
trainee's wages.
Unofficial Votes
Both votes were taken by count-
ing members as they passed
through tellers and individual po-
sitions were not recorded.
The amendment to transfer work
and training programs to the De-
partments of Labor and Health,
Education and Welfare was of-
fered as a substitute for the Neigh-
borhood Youth Corps.
It would have"retained some
features of the youth corps and
added provisions for job counsel-
ors to help high school youths find
employment in private industry
and for job training with private
employers.
Four Times
Rep. John R. Dellenback (R-
Ore), said the contribution of pri-
vate employers would be four times
the $243 million cost to the federal
government. The administration
bill would allocate $579 million
for work and training programs.
After defeat of the substitute
measure, Rep. Albert H. Quie (R-
Minn) offered the provision for job
training in private industry as a
separate amendment to the Neigh-
borhood Youth Corps.
Opposition
This move was opposed by Rep.
James G. O'Hara (D-Mich), who
said Congress should move care-
fuly before deciding to pay 25 per
cent of the wages of a private em-
ployer in competition with other
enterprises.
The House has been considering
the antipoverty bill for six days
and final actions is unlikely today
at the earliest. Still to be decided
are amendments to the most con-
troversial part of the legislation,.
the Community Action program.
An amendment adopted in the
Education and Labor Committee
would put Community Action
agencies under the control of state
or local governments. Members of
both parties from several large
cities object to the amendment
and an attempt will be made to
eliminate it.
More Fighting
Still further ahead is another
fight over funding for the pro-
gram. Republicans failed Monday
to trim its $2.06 billion authoriza-
tion to $1.4 billion, but will have
another chance in a motion to re-
commit the bill just before the
holiday.

By The Associated Press I the election was very close, the
SAN FRANCISCO-()P)The state closest mayoralty election in
Supreme Court yesterday stayed Cleveland history."
all executions in California. He cited the fact that the offi-
The stay applied to a total of 60 cial count last Saturday reduced
prisoners already under sentence Stokes' margin by one third-
of death and to others who may from 2,501 to 1,644 and that
receive such sentences before the Stokes had asked for a recountI
court hears challenges of consti- two years ago when he lost by
tutionality of capital punishment 2.143 to Ralph S. Locher.
next January.
The court announced last week AItIlC ~ G
that it would hold hearings early A meican Held
next year in all death penalty
cases involving constitutional is- In East Germany
sue action was taken in blanket BERLIN-U.S. authorities said
cases originally filed in U.S. Dis- yesterday a 30-year-old Columbia
trict Court. University history teacher will be
U.S. District Court Judge Rob- put on trial by East Germany.
ert F. Peckham had ordered the Ronald Wiedenhoeft of Mllwau-
condemned men to exhaust reme-
dies in state courts.
Defense attorneys charge that
California penalty juries were
death oriented, that there were no
judges in sentencing killers to PEN IN (
death, that capital punishment is
cruel and unusual punishment,
and that after the automatic ap-
peal from a death sentence con-
demned are not guaranteed coun-
sel.

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kee. Wis., has been held in East
Berlin since Sept. 5.
A spokesman at the U.S. Em-
bassy in Bonn declared, "We know
he will be put on trial but we do
not know where or when." The
spokesman declined to give fur-
ther details.
U.S. authorities in West Berlin
said they knew nothing about a
trial for Wiedenhoeft being set.
beyond what was disclosed by the
embassy in Bonn.
Juergen Stangle, Widenhoeft's
West Berlin attorney, said, "About
one week ago East Berlin author-
ities told me, 'We can tell you that
an arrest order on suspicion of es-
pionage has been issued.' "
Apparently involved are picuures
Wiedenhoeft took in East Berlin.

-Associatea ress
DEMONSTRATORS HAMPER RECRUITER
Students at the University of Texas staged a sit-in yesterday in front of a Marine recruitment desk.
Captain Roy DeForest, a graduate of the University of Texas, and a Vietnam veteran was sur-
rounded by a few of the demonstrators. The demonstration was non-violent.
ECONOMISTS PREDICT:
Tax Raise Defeat May Spell
increase i Prices, Interest

; SOONI

SpyI

Shop

WASHINGTON (P)--In the ab- price rise roughly matching the
sence of a tax increase in 1968, 5.5 per cent rate of increase dur-
many economists expect a price ing the Korean war.

rise of around 5 per cent for con-I
sumers next year, along with in-
terest rates of 8 per cent or more
for business borrowers.
Virtually all agree, however, that
the Federal Reserve would imme-
diately start clamping down on the
credit supply if Congress goes
home without acting on President
Johnson's bid for a 10 per cent
surtax.
If the Federal Reserve moves off
the easy-money stance it has
maintained uneasily this year, the
rise in interest rates would be ac-
celerated. Rates already stand at

.

The forecasts indicated that sen-
timent among professional econ-
omists across the country matches
that of the President's own ad-
visers.
Consumer prices would rise 4 to
6 per cent. The family dollar thus
would lose about a nickel"s worth
of buying power over the year. The
loss might be 3 to 3.5 per cent,
many economists said. if the sur-
tax is imposed. The increase last
year was 2.7 per cent.
The Housing industry fears a
1968 recession if mortgage rates
soar. Several administrations hous-

i

of $49.3 bilion. If the surtax were1
voted, at the same 10 per cent rate,
as is proposed for individual in-
come tax payers, the after-tax pro-j
fits probably would not match the!
1966 total.z
The President's Council of Econ-
omic Advisers says the increase inj
total national output might ap-1
proximate $75 billion without a
tax increase-an unhealthy rapid
and inflationary rate of expansion,
in the council's view.

Taft Requests
Election Recount
CLEVELAND - Seth C. Taft,
who lost Cleveland's mayoral elec-
tion by a slim 1,644 votes, asked
for a recount yesterday although
he said he is convinced Negro Carl
B. Stokes is the winner.
Taft told a news conference he
had decided on a recount to allay
the doubts of thousands of people
who were unhappy with the result.
"I have no evidence of error or
irregularities sufficient to change
the results," Taft said. "However,

J... . t. V ,.. r W V 1

KOSHER STYLE BAKERY
and DELICATESSEN
802 South State ,
769-1 0 17

a 46-year high on some U.S. Treas- ing officials have endorsed con-
ury bond offerings. gressional proposals to remove the
But the money-tightening moves 6 per cent limit on mortgages in-
could dampen pressures which- surel by the Federal Housing Ad-
in the opinion of most government ministration or guaranteed by the
and business economists whose Veterans Administration.
views have been canvassed bythe Corporation earnings after taxes
Associated Press-might set off a probably would top the 1966 record

Don't miss
DR BENJAMIN SPOCK
also: Burt Garskof
Art McPhaul
Sponsored by THE NEW POLITICS PARTY
DONATION
Fri., Nov. 17, 7:45 P.M. AA High Auditorium

ATID
ISRA EL STUDENTS

/4//el,
SZO
ORGAN IZATION

I

present
INSTITUTE ON SOVIET JEWRY
NOVEMBER 17 to 19
Friday at 7:15 P.M. Sabbath Service
ONEG SHABBAT
FILM: "THE PRICE OF SILENCE"

A

TONIGHT at

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'(1JE ARK

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8:30 P.M.

1421 Hill St.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.";."{;.. . .. . ..:r:' 5::f " ." : v.{ '..Y :..;..Yv.". inAi"a

"SHOULD THE PEACE CORPS BE SUSPENDED.
IN VIEW OF PRESENT U.S. FOREIGN POLICY?"
A DEBATE
THURSDAY-
IMAGES OF THE U.S.A.
THREE DRAMA PROFILES
"Was the unknown soldier a nigger, a mick, a kike,
a wop, or a wasp?"
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY-
MICHAEL COONEY

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(Continued from Page 2),
Friday, December 1, 1967
Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
Graduate School of Business, Cam-
bridge, Mass.-All students interested in
MBA and PhD. programs.
Monday, December 4, 1967
National Security Agency, Wash. D.C.
-M & F. All liberal arts students who
qualified on NSA Test, or Math and
Engineering students, who are not req.
to take test, for EDP, Languages, Li-
brary, Stat., Writing(Tech.), and Info.
Anal.
Indiana University, Graduate School
of Business, Bloomington, IndI-M & F.
Any degree, any major for MBA and
PhD programs.
Tuesday, December 5, 1967
National Security Agency, Wash. D.C.
--See Mon., Dec. 4 listing for details.
Tuesday, December 12, 1967
StanfordUniversity, Secondary Teach-
er Education Program, Calif.-A.M. only
BA/MA Anthro., Biochem., Chem., Econ.,
Engl., Fine Arts, For. Lang., Geog.,
Geol., Hist., Math, Music, Physics, Poll.
SO., Psych., Speech, Soc. Drama. For
5th year teacher training program,
(MAT).
4 1
Tomorrow & Friday
THE MAN ON
THE FLYING
TRAPEZE
Dir. Clyde Bruckman, 1935
Starring that master of
inspired mayhem, the
inevitable bumbler,
W. C. Fields!!
Saturday & Sunday
ON THE
WAqrcn

TEACHER PLACEMENT
The following schools will interview
at the Bureau during the week of
Nov. 20:
Mon., Nov. 20
Orchard Lake, Mich. (West Bloom-
field P.S.) - Elem. - Instrumental;
Jr. High Library; Jr. High Type A -
Spec. Ed.
Tues., Nov. 216
Southfield, Mich. - Elem. - Vocal,
J.H. - Math, Set, Vocal Mus., Couns.,
H.S. - Chem, Bus/Typ., Chem/Biol.
Wed., Nov. 22
Howell, Mich. (Livingston Interm.
Sch. Dist) - All Spec. Ed. - Type A,
Type C, Counselor for Phys. Hand,
Speech Corr., Sch. Psychologist.
Make apopintments now.
For additional information and ap-
pointments contact Miss Donnelly, Bur-
eau 'of Appointments, Education Divi-
sion, 3200 S.A.B.° 764-7459.
There will be no interviews asched-
uled for Nov. 23 and 24 because of the
Thanksgiving holidays.

i
(41

doing songs of all shapes and sizes from blues to children's songs,
traditional ballads to topical songs, playing banjo, 6 and 12 string
guitars, harmonica, penny whistle, uke, and kazoo.

',

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--_

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THE LIGHT BRIGADE
The Maltese Cross Movement Presents
A two-hour light show featuring
The Magic Mandala
"Eastern" Music
Dancing Nurses
Soldiers of H.R.M. 22nd Light Brigade
CANTERBURY HOUSE, Wed., Thurs., Nov. 15, 16
9:00 P.M. Adm. $1.00

I

TURKEY
HUNT,
FRIDAY,

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DROP OUT IN
KUKURANTUMI
in the Peace Corps
Nov. 13-17 3524 SAB
phone 763-3189

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3
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17

0

3:30

to 5:30

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MARKLEY
COURTYARD

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