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November 15, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 15. 19G7

1V 1VV

PBL Removes the Rosy Filter

:r.S ". .: : S };v
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

By ROGER RAPOPORT
!ommercial television normally
sts on handling controversial
les with a filter. When we must
into a. ghetto we accompany a
hair-suited Mike Wallace who
:es his microphone into the face
a Negro child and asks him.
t.it feels like to be hungry.
Vhen we need to be lectured
ut the ills being perpetuated.by
white establishment we get it
pre-digested form.in Eric Sev-
id's fatherly tone.
That drama does manage to,
ke it onto the.TV screen is sel-
1 controversial and almost
er in prime-time.
ast week the new Public Broad-
t Laboratory, an , experimental
adcasting endeavor backed with
10 million Ford Foundation
,nt, cut through the cliches with
first experimental 21/2°-hour
adcast devoted to racial prob-
s5. PBL will air 26 Sunday night
adcasts over an educational
vision network -of 125 stations.
ing the next two years (seen
ally over Channels 56 and 10).
ut even before PBL could de-
er its first show the' trouble
ted. More than. 20 Southern
vision stations jammed out the
t show, primarily because PBL
sented Douglas Turner Ward's
troversial playr "A Day of Ab-
nce."
RGAN IZATION
NOTICES

The drama portrays a day in
the life of a sleepy Southern town
where all the Negroes have van-
ished. Suddenly white belles are
forces to diaper their own babies,
cook their own meals and scrub
out the toilet bowl. A reverse min-
strel show, the white characters
are all played by Negroes in white-
face.
The drama drew the bulk of the
criticism aimed at the first show.
To begin with, Edward W. Barrett,
head of PBL's policy board, op-
posed presenting the play because
it was too long. And New York
Times television critic Jack Gould
felt the whiteface was in bad taste,
"because it shattered the credibil-
ity of a not uninteresting idea."
Another segment of the show
was a raging debate in a Chicago
studio between a wide variety of
Negroes and whites on all sides of
the political spectrum. It led with
a home movie-like tour of a South
Side ghetto area, narrated by
black nationalist Russ Meek, and
then went into a lengthy discus-
sion between bleeding white liber-
als, bigots, and a Salvation Army
stalwart who had just given her
white daughter up to a Negro hus-
band.
Time said the debate was "curi-
ously lopsided" and "there was no
white activist present who could
'represent a more moderate point
of view."
The non-commercials have made
advertising groups furious, and
PBL has offered them equal time.
Village Voice critic Stephanie
Harrington panned the commer-
cials for being too "message
oriented." And she asked, "When,
gentlemen, do we get time out to
go to the bathroom?"
Across
Campus,
Studs Terkel, Chicago inter-
view-radio man, author of the
well known book, "Division Street,
America" and playwright for
APA's upcoming "Amazing Grace"
is speaking 'iA Angell Hall to-
night at 7:30. His lecture, "The
Split Within Us" is well worth
attending, for Terkel, if anyone,
reveals an acute understanding'
of the individual and the prob-
lems in America's disturbed
cities.

And the Wall Street Journal re-
ported that congressmen felt the
programs were "too anti-backlash
in coverage of city elections" and
had "hurt the cause" of building
support for financing the govern-
ment's new public TV venture.
The PBL staff itself was not en-
tirely in agreement about the
show. Internally there was con-
siderable controversy about run-
ning the Ward play. But clearly
the staff was not catering to the
critics.
"If we wanted to get a good re-
view from Jack Gould we knew
how to do it," says PBL producer
Joe Russin. "Cut the play, tone
the rest down a little. But that
wasn't what we were after."
Indeed what really upset the
critics like the narrow-minded
Southern television station own-
ers, Jack Gould and Time Maga-
zine was the fact that PBL really
let the Negro dramatists andrmili-
tants have their say. This, how-
ever, was the program's real
strength.
By letting the Negro's have their
own say the viewer was able to get
a much clearer picturer of the ra-
cial problem.
By listening to Meek tell his
own story about the rats and sec-
ond-rate schools in Chicago the
viewer can better understand what
the ghetto situation is like first-
hand. Ward's abrasive play aband-
ons the polite rhetoric to take a
rough look at the white system.
The problem is that the coin-
mercial TV officials and critics
like Jack Gould still have their
nose buried in "Black Like Me"
and haven't even heard of the
"Autobiography of Malcom X."
The critics don't seem to under-
stand that the country is not all
speaking the same language..
This means that TV is obligated
to get away from its one dimen-
sional presentations. Analysis of
the race problem can't continue to
be done solely from a white mod-
erate viewpoint.
The legitimate function of PBL
would seem to be looking at news
from the underdog's point of view,
be he the Negro militant, the
price-conscious consumer, or rebel-
lious dramatist. One of the crucial
defects of the media is that the
establishment uses it too much to
talk to one another. It isn't used to
hearing what the other side is say-
ing. PBL's initial show suggests
that as long last TV may begin to
fill this need.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only,
Studentaorganization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Day Calendar
Interdepartmental Seminars in Fluid
Mechanics-Professor L. A. Segel, Rens-
selaer Polytechnic Institute, "Recent
Developments in Nonlinear Convection
Theory," Wednesday, November 15, 325
West Engineering Bldg., 4:00 p.m. Cof-
fee hour will be held in 214 West
Engineering Bldg.. 3:30 p.m.
University of Michigan Sesquicenten-
nial Major Ceremony-"Fertility and
Family Planning: A World View"-Reg-
istration, Rackham Lobby, 9:00 a.m. to
1:00 p.m.; Session I, "Fertility Trends
in the Modern World," Philip Hauser,
Ph.D., Speaker: Rackham Lecture Hall,
2:00 to 4:30 p.m.
Aeronomy Program Sesquicentennial
Seminar-Dr. W. W. Kellogg, National
Center for Atmospheric Research,
"Winds, Waves, and Tides in the Lower
Ionosphere": 1042 East Engineering,
4:00 p.m.
Department of Architecture Lecture
-Norbert H. Gorwic, Crane and Gorwic,
Wayne State University, "The Baroque
City" : Architecture Auditorium, 4:00
p.m.
School of Education Colloquia, Lec-
ture Series on Collective Negotiations
-Dr. John English, Superintendent,
Southfield Public Schools, "The Role
of the Superintendent and Administra-
tive Staff inNegotiations and Agree-
ment Administration": UES Cafeteria,
4:00 p.m.
StatistJcs Seminar-Vaclav Fabian.
Czech Academy of Science, Prague and
Michigan State University, "A New
Proof of Asymptotic Normality inSto-
chastic" Approximation" 3201 Angell
Hall, 4:00 p.m.

c
t
t
t
t
i
i

Zoology Seminar-Dr. Claire J. Shell-
abarger, Professor of Zoology. Univer-
sity of Michigan, "Radiation-Induced
Neoplasia," 1400 Chemistry Bldg., 4:00
p.m.
Department of English Poetry Read-
ing-Mr. David Ignatow, poet, Natural
Science Auditorium, 4:10 p.m.
Department of Speech Student Lab-
oratory Theatre Program--G. B. Shaw's
The Inca of Perusalem and Levy's The
Truth About Truth: Arena Theater,
Frieze Building, 4:10 p.m.
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Seminar-"Management of
Behavior Change": Michigan Union,
8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
-Mr. Hilmar Kristjonnson, Chief, Fish-
ing Gear Branch, Food and Agriculture
Organization, United Nations, Rome,
Italy, "New Horizons in Fish Catching,"
1032 Natural Resources Building, 7:30
p.m.
Professional Theatre Program and
University Activities Center Lecture--
Studs Terkel, Author of Professional
Theatre Program's new play, Amazing
Grace, "The Split Among Us": Auditor-
lum A, Angell Hall, 7:30 p.m.
Department of Romance Languages
and' Sociedad Hispanica Film-Calle
Mayor{The Lovemaker) : Multipurpose
Room, Undergraduate Library, 8:00 p.m.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society Operetta
-The Mikado: Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, 8:00 p.m.
General Notices
Doctoral Examination for: Mitsuru
Misawa, Business Administration, Thesis
"The Historical and Comparative Study
of the Post-War Japanese Securities
Markets in the Light of Law and Busi-
ness Practice," on Wednesday, Novem-
ber 15 at 1:00 p.m. in Conference Room,
816 Business Administration Building,
Chairman: W. J. Eiteman.
Doctoral Examination for: Robert
Charles Restrick, III Electrical Engineer-
ing, Thesis: "Electromagnetic Scatter-
ing by Moving Bodies," on Wednesday,
November 15 at 1 p.m. in Room 3073
East Engineering Building, Chairman:
C. T. Tai.
Doctoral Examination for: Peter Her-
mann Roosen-Runge, Communication
Sciences, Thesis: "An Algebraic Descrip-
tion of Access and Control in Informa-
tion-Processing Systems," on Wednes-

day, November 15 at 2:00 p.m. in
Room 2066 Mental Health Research
Institute, Chairman: M. Kochen.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Peace Corps Team: no appts necess,
room 3529 SAB. Speakers avail for
campus groups, call 763-3189. Testing
4 times daily, 9 a.m., 12 noon, 3 p.m.,
and 7 p.m. Free movies at 4:15, room
3529 S.A.B. Short program at the ARK
Coffeehouse on Hill St. at 8:30 Wed.
night, tonight. Panel discussion has
been canceled.
Placement Interviews, call 764-7460,
Gen. Division, for appts. before 4:00
p.m. day preceding interview.
Week of Nov. 20-End of recruiting
season, interviewing starts again on
Jan. 15, 1968.
Monday, November 20, 1967
United States Marine Corps, Detroit,
Mich.-M & F. All degrees all fields for
Adv., Lang., Mgmt. Trng., Pers., Pub.
Rel., Recreation, Trans., Writing.
United States Navy, Detroit, Mich.-
M & F. All degrees, all majors for
Officer programs, Law Specialists.
Unilever Limited, London, England-
M & F. British Nationals only. PhD.
Biochem., Chem. (Anal., Gen., Inorgan.,
Organ., Phys.) Math, Microbiol., and
physics. for Res. & Dev.
Tuesday, November 21, 1967
United States Marine Corps, Detroit,
Mich.-See Mon. listing for details.
United States Navy, Detroit, Mich.-
See Mon. listing for details.
Ohio State University, College of
Commerce and Administration, Colum-
bus, Ohio.-AM only. Students interest-
ed in MBA and PhD. programs.
Wednesday, November 22, 1967
United States Marine Corps, Detroit,
Mich.-See Mon. listing for details.
United States Navy, Detroit, Mich.-
See Mon. listing for details.
Public Service Commission of Can-
ada and the Department of Manpower
and Immigration, Ottawa, Canada-
Group meeting at 3 p.m. in Room 3K,
Michigan Union to give info, on oppor-
tunities in Canada. If interestedplease
call the Bureau, Gen. Div., 764-7460.
Interviews after Thanksgiving, if
others should request to come for
interviews their dates and recruiting
information will be posted in the Daily
Official Bulletin only.
Wednesday, November 29, 1967
United Air Lines, Pittsburgh, Pa.-
Women, any degree, any major for
Stewardess.
(Cnntinued on Page 3)

Now!LAIM IijDial
Now8-64
"ROGER CORMAN'S BEST PICTURE. A quite remark-
able film, striking and imaginative."
--Saturday Review
SLOV E LYOR ToDEAT
Samuel Z. Arkoff l James H. Nicholson
""Roger Corman's Production of
.PSYCHEDEUC COLORN RECOMM
PETER FONDA'SUSAN STRASBERG OA U EC
pm ar". s' sene i
f ; screen ..direc t fro ts 8Zt
9

A

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41

SE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-C
UNCEMENTS is available to officially
ognized and registered student orga-
ations only. Forms are available in
)m 1011 SAB,
** *
rniversity of Michigan Turkish Stu-
it Association, Nov. 16,.CAB Bldg.
m 3529-Speakers: Hi'kmet Sebuk-
Ia, Bekir Ozgen, "American Influence
Turkish Education".
rndergraduate Psychology Asociation,
k Mann: New Directions in College
irses--Nov. 15, 1967-8:00 p.m. Room
IUnion.
Iraduate Aseimbly, Special meeting
a "Committee of the Whole." Wed.,
v. 15, 7:30 pam., in Q.A. Office (2nd
>r, Rackham' Bldg.). Purpose: To
ate the merits of GA. participation
the "Constitutional Convention" pro -
ed by the undegraduate student
'erment (SGC)
* * *
,ibertarian Leagule-Ayn Rand Society,;
sting, Nov. 1 8'p.m. 3D Union.
aits Housing Educational Commit-.
Lecture-"The Great Proletarian
ltural Revolution" by Dr. Chen Chu-
.n, Centert for Chinese Studies, Nov.
7:30. p.m., St#ley House Lounge--
ts I.
a Sociedad Hispanica, movie, Nov. 15,
.m. UGLI Multipurpose room.
M Scottish Country Dance Society,
ice meeting every Wed. 8-10:30 p.m.
B lounge.
M Rifle Club, invites you to learn
shoot every Wednesday, 7-9 p.m.
TO Range.
M FolkloreSociety,workshop,Nov. 18,
0p.m., Ark Coffee House, 1421 Hill.
aha't Student Group, informal dis-
sion: "All Things Made New," Nov.
8:00 p.m., 520 N. Ashley. Call 662-
3 if you need transportation.
* * *
authern Asia Club: There will be a
lunch on Friday, Nov. 17, noon,
amons Room, Lane Hall. Mr. Amar
nar Singh, Heal of the Dept. of
:hology, Ranchi University will speak
"The Impact of Industrialization on
Labor Force in Bihar, India."
niversity Lutheran Chapel, 1511
shtenaw, Wed. 15, 8:00 p.m. Chapel
embly business imeeting- with Mr.
hrn to discuss organs. 10:00 p.m.,
-week devotion with Pastor Scheips.{
Y Communion will be celebrated.

.. .

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NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES ,
F VLL6E
375 No.MAPLE RD.-"769.1300
The glamour
m(ffessff*
hespeed
and
Spec/ac/e!
I S

Mon. thru Thurs. 8:00 P.M.
Fri. 6:00-9:00
Sat.-Sun. 2:00-5:15-8:45

Last 2 Days
ENDING THURSDAY
in JAMES CLAVELL'S
10TE'
*@FRIDAY 0*
Richard Burton
Eliabeth Taylor in
"Taming Of The Shrew"

CINEMA II
presents
THE BEATLES
sI
in
NIHT
k/
and
Chapter 4 FLASH GORDON
Fri.-Sat.-Sun. 7:00 and 9:15 P.M.
Nov. 17-19 Aud. A, Angell Hall
___-~50c

at
"s6'tMCOLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS
ELIZABETH RICHARD
IN THE BURTON-ZEFFIRELU PRODUCTION OF
THETAMING F
THE SHREW

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Information NO 2-6264

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STARTS TOMORROW

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THE WALTER READI

JR /JOSEPH STRICK PRODUC

ON

Admittance will be denied to a[ !under 16 years of age.
" Starring MILO O'SHEA . BARBARA JEFFORD
MAURICE ROEVES . T. P. McKENNA . ANNA MANAHAN

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