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November 10, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FAGS TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1067

- ---_ - - -___--

. _ f

AT LYDIA MENDELSSOHN:I
Once Upon Soph Show:I
Sparkling Bedtime Story'

cinema
Corman's 'Trip' Seeks New
Directions in American Cinema

11

TONIGHT at
THE ARK

8:30 P.M.

1421 Hill. Street

THE LAURALEI
singing English, Scottish, and Appalacion ballads
SATURDAY
THE WEST AFRICAN GROUP
(with Fobi, Solomon, Horocio, Chief Koko, and others)
doing typical African music-including the TALKING DRUMS,
Xylophone, and Folk music.
$1.00 Cover includes entertainment and refreshments!

By LARRY GLOVER
Soph Show's "Once Upon a Mat-
tress" is a vibrant success of fun-
filled delight. The production is a
captivating blend of technical ex-
pertise and joyful zest under the
imaginative direction of Elliot
Siegel.
From the gracefully performed
overture and beautiful opening
ballet the play moves with an
assurance and style of professional
quality, The plot (a Sleeping
Beauty reversal) comes from the
charming genre of pre-pubescent
comedy so characteristic of Amer-
ica in the fifties.
A rowdy princess must prove her
authenticity by failure to fall
asleep on a twenty story bed (a
mattress makers answer to U.
Towers) because her sensitivity
will be upset by a pea at the bot-

tently versatile as singer, dancer,
and comedienne.
The male chorus is surprisingly
good, frequently outshining the
female counterparts. One of the
ladies in waiting Linda Dewey,
comes on like Mae West and is
a stand out even in the back-
ground.
The orchestra, under the direc-
tion of Pace Sturdevant, demon-
strated their skill by not being
overly loud, while constantly pro-

viding inventive accompaniement.
Choreography, costumes and set
all enhanced the production.
Creative fluidity and dramatic
vitality combine to make a Soph
Show that will be a long remem-
bered tribute to the class of '70.
Such a throughly enjoyable
evening makes one wish that there
would be more class entertain-
ments inorder to fully utilize the
diversity and excellence of talent
on campus.

Bergman's Lighter Side
Appreciated by Youth

tom.

Bonnie Buderus, as Princess
Winnifred, exhibites the energy of
a theatrical dynamo with a phe-
nomenal vocal range and comic
facility reminiscent of a pretty
Martha Raye. In "Song of Love
she fills an already physically full
stage with an exuberance that
makes the scene entirely her own
despite her, fifty capable com-
panions.
The object of her frenzied court-
ship, the Prince Dauntless (Kurt
Lauer) is another amazing ex-
ample of hyper-presence and ado-
lescent awkwardness.
The villain mother, Queen Ag-
gravain (Lin Kaatz) is superb
with perfect timing and complex-
lity of rhythm. She looks like the
Red Queen from Alice in Wonder-
land. She can shift from a Lady
Bracknell's elegant bitchiness to
become a dancing locomotive in
the lively Spanish Panic. Her
husband, King Sextimus the Silent
(David Tickton) is a lovably leach-
erous cross between a super
charades player and an ape.
The lyrical lovers who comprise
the subplot are also excellent. Sir
Harry , (Herbert Karpicke) pro-
vides perfection of understatement
making the most of each situation.
His pregnant girlfriend Lady Lar-
ken (Cathy Cole) has a beautiful
soprano voice and, when she
warms up, performs with graceful
humor.
There are two minor disappoint-
ments in suporting parts. The
Minstrel (Paul Balaam) has the
distracting habit of saccharine
poising and random bobbing. Al-
though he has the best male voice,
his generally vacuous interpretion
would be more in place on the
Lawrence Welk Show. The other
lack luster performance comes
from the Jester (Eric Oppenheim)
who manages to make the part
even more silly and useless than
the script does.
The wily dragon of a wizard
(Larry Chanen) is a marvelously
exaggerated type in the best Gil-
bert and Sullivan style. Bonnie
Britton in a range of roles from
Princess No. 12 to a spiteful
nightingale (descending in a cage
from the ceiling in a magic bra-
vura of stage craft) was compe-

cI

By STEVE NEWMAN
Although film director Ingmar
Bergman's current critical acclaim
rests on films such as "Through
A Glass Darkly," "Wild Strawber-
ries," "The Silence," and other
supposedly "profound" works which
appeal to the middle-aged minds
of America's powerful movie crit-
ics, these movies are increasingly
being considered pretentious, arty,
and often intentionally cryptic.
If the growing movement of
young moviegoers wins out, Berg-
man may soon be largely appreci-
ated for his lighter (and, I think,
much more enjoyable) movies such
as "Smiles of a Summer Night,"
showing this weekend at Cinema
II.
In Sweden Bergman is respected
more for his work in the theatre
than he is for his films. He spends
most of his time in the theatre
(making films only in the sum-
mer). Bergman has directed over
eighty stage productions and less
than thirty films. He has been
the head of some of the nation's
most important municipal thea-
tres and is currently one of the
major producers for the National
Theatre of Sweden.
He turns to films as a natural
by-product of his theatrical work,
as Picasso turns to sculpture. Berg-
man has repeatedly said he could
live without films (although they
are more profitable for him) but
not without the theatre.
Despite these personal opinions,

America knows him best for his
films, and "Smiles of a Summer
Night" will probably be one of the
most durable of Bergman's works
because it doesn't antagonize the
anti-symbolists. It is a highly styl-
ized, manneristic comedy dealing
with the triumph of women over
men.
The-plot concerns a middle-aged
doctor and his young, virgin wife
who come to visit the home of a
proud but stupid nobleman and
his frustrated spose. Also in the
action are the doctor's son, who is
in love with his virgin step-mother,
and a middle-aged actress who has
designs on the middle-aged doctor.
After changing the beds several
times and some horsing around by
the servants, the right women get
matched with the right men.
Bergman's camera technique is
especially fine in this film, and
the traditional members of his
cast, (Ulla Jacobson, Eva Dahl-
beck, Margrit Carlquist, Bibi An-
dersson, Jarl Kuule, et al) give
their usual brilliant performances.
Unfortunately, this print excludes
subtitles on some of the lustier
dialogue, but fortunately, Cinema
II has acquired Cinema Guild's
supplementary tape which will be
played during its proper scene.
Even though it was made twelve
years ago (1955), "Smiles of a
Summer Night' is Bergman at his
bawdiest, and it is considered by
several authorities, (e.g., John
Russel Taylor in "Cinema Eye,
Cinena Ear"), to be his best film.

By RICHARD AYERS
When the word was out about
six months ago that a film was
being made about an LSD trip,
there was a general groan of dis-
approval from all film-lovers. All,
that is, except those who are
familiar with American Interna-
tional films and Roger Corman
productions. Roger Corman has
directed, produced, or otherwise
controlled almost all of the best
films to make the drive-in circuit
of American movies.
Corman's goal, made most clear
in 'The Trip", is to make beautiful
pictures. Always focusing on the
American thing, Corman puts on
the screen picture after picture
of beautiful people, beautiful
colors, and beautiful worlds. He
created and set the pace for
motorcycle movies with "Wild
Angels"; he broke the gangster
movie out of the 1930 black-and-
white-realism with "St. Valentine's
Day Massacre."
Turning out film after film at
a rate faster than even Godard,
Corman changes American movie
history as fast as he makes it.
There are so many things to
talk about in reviewing "The
Trip". First I would like to men-
tion Peter Fonda. Fonda comes
out with words like "wow" and
"man" about fifty times in the
movie; normally, this would put
one off as Hollywood-imitating-a-
distorted-idea-of-hippies. But he
brings it off with convincing sin-
cerity. Filled with brilliant affec-
tations, Fonda's acting is itself a
delicate element to be worked into
the movie.
Then there are Corman's allu-
sions to other films. These are
included as an entertaining fea-
ture, but not an injoke, of the
American neo-new wave. Fonda
takes a picture of a murdered
friend (from "Blow-up") or sees
the theatrical death figures (from
"Seventh Seal"). These are not
just the director speaking to the
audience, but Fonda's fantasies
taken from his life, which ob-
viously included going to a lot
of movies.
Corman has adapted the tech-
niques of the American experimen-

tal underground to Hollywood for Also from the American under-
the first time, to my knowledge, ground are Corman's hand-held
without corrupting their best as- camera sequences-some of the
pects (as was done in such sappy best subjective camera scenes in
efforts as "You're a Big Boy movies. Ed Emshwiller is the only
Now") or using them for illegiti- other American to shoot this way
mate ends (as in current "hip" with competence.
advertising). Something must be said about
Of course there are the psyche- the color. It is not the pastel con-
delic affects (specially created by trolled image of Antonioni or the
"Charlatan Productions"). Some- grotesque circus of Fellini (often
times these are run-of-the-mill said to be the two camps color
psychedelic images; which is to films gravitate towards). Rather
say, only fantastic. Other times it is the strikingly straight-
they are images projected on or- foreward color of Anger's "Scorpio
ganic things, as in the brilliant Rising". "The Trip" is not "a
sexual fantasies. Perhaps the best black-and-white film shot with
use of the psychedelic images is in color stock"; it manipulates colors
the "straight" scenes. For in- without seeming affected.
stances, a single shot of Peter If you give yourself to the film
Fonda walking across a room may and let it work on you, you will
be interrupted by five flashes of find it to be one of the most
these images, each one lasting exciting and significant American
only a few frames. films.
Low Funds Hinder Search
For 'U' Faculty Members

El

AS 7 YS
WARM,
MOVING,
AND
HUMOROUS I"
Wanda Hale,
New York Daily News
-Starts 11/17-
"Taming of the Shrew"

SIDNEY
in JAMES CLAVELL'S
'To Sm,
WITH
Shows. at 1 3, 5, 7, 91:10

i

4'

*

I

(Continued from Page 1)
are needed in the college at all
faculty levels."t
Despite a policy of 'frozen',en-
rollment for the college in the
past few years, there is a pro-
jected increase of 300 students
for next year. Hays says, however,
that it's hard to tell exactly how
many students will show up. "It's
difficult to project the exact
student-to-teacher ratio neces-
sary in determining precise staff
needs," he comments.
On the question of salary com-
petition with other schools, Hays
reports "we're holding our own."
Vice-President Smith, also com-
menting on faculty salaries,
warns, "if another year like this
goes by with little salary increase,
losing relatively many faculty
members throughout the Univer-
sity would be a distinct possibil-
ity."
A problem that has a definite
effect on recruiting of faculty
members, even when sufficient

funds are available, is the phy-
sical space problem currently
facing the University.
There is a serious lack of labor-
atory space and equipment, and
faculty office space. According to
Smith, this lack of space "con-
stitutes a hazard in recruiting."
"Professors will turn down sub-
stantial salary increase offers if
they have to give up their right
to a private office to come to the
Univesrity, Leveque says. He adds
that a mathematician "needs
peace and quiet to work. You
can't concentrate with another
person working in a cramped of-
fice, with his students contin-
ually trapising in and out of the
office and through the halls be-
tween classes."
The psychology department is
also feeling the space pinch. "We
need more lab space," says Nor-
man. "It's a very difficult prob-
lem in recruiting and in matching
offers made to our staff by other
schools."

FOX EASTERN TFORTWE.
375 No. MAPLE RD. '769.130

NOW SHOWING
2 BIG HITS

Production
LEE MARVIN
"POINT BLANIC'

ANGIE DICKINSON,
In PanavlslenandMeMtrolor

PLUS-

l ll

*

NOW SHOWING

DIAL 8-6416

SGC Lifts Auto Regulations

(Continued from Page 1)
lated from past student parking
fees could be used to defray the
cost of new spaces and structures
such as the one proposed for Hill
Street behind the business admin-
istration school."
Mogill complained that "the
same administrators who have
told me in private that they're
willing to commit some of these
spaces to students have been un-
willing to make the same com-
mitments before the Student
Traffic Advisory Board."
He said, "I anticipate that even
now the University will only act

because the city will try to pres-
sure it to do so. Regarding park-
ing and traffic, the city has al-
ways been willing to do more
than the University."
UAC President Don Tucker, '68,
said last night that the decision
was "a joint one" made byKuen-
zel and himself. "The decision
was not at all political or bureau-
cratic. It was purely practical."
The original motion before
Council called for a timetable
that would have streched the
effects of the elimination of driv-
ing regulations over a three-year
period.

"THE MOST UNABASHED
ART FILM EVER TO COME
the lushest visual effects ever seen in an above-ground
American movie. There hasn't been such textural richness

Mon.-Fri.: "POINT" 7:00-10:25 "NAKED" 8:44
"POINT" :05-4' 35-8:05
SAT-StUN.:"NAKED" 2:40-6:15-9:45
STARTS WEDNESDAY
.Glamnollr. Speed!.. Spectaclo.~

on the screen since the heyday of Sternberg."

-L.A. TIMES

i

f

i

.:....;S.....s"-i

HELD 3dWE
YOVER 3rd WEEK!

DIRECT FROM ITS ROADSHOW ENGAGEMENT!
SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES - SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES

3 SHOWS DAILY

e CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCES
o NO SEATS RESERVED

"That this picture will arouse controversy is implicit in its
subject matter...The real impact and import of THE TRIP
is that, for the first time, Hollywood has tuned into the
vibrations - good and bad - humming hallucinogenically
throughout the nation." -PLAYBOY MAGAZINE
"Adroitly staged fantasy episodes." -N.Y. TIMES
"...Extraordinary camera work in an exciting sound track,
with the two forming a kaleidoscope view of life."
HOLLYWOOD CITIZEN NEWS
"The most sensational picture in Boston is 'The Trip.' Every
kind of hue the mind can imagine and the eye can see."
BOSTON GLOBE
"ROGER CORMAN'S BEST PICTURE
A quite remarkable film, striking and imaginative."
-SATURDAY REVIEW
"A sexy movie through a kaleidoscope."
- KANSAS CITY STAR
"It is ever groovy...THE TRIP is really a curious and wildly

maan

um

imaginative work."

#r

EGOAAWVYNAMAYERPNMSETRCLRMG
IN SUPER PANAVISION ANO METROCOLOR MGM

aman

- CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER

How to Celebrate
the Week AFTER Thanksgiving!
!
See the University Players
Department of Speech in
IIA
Wed.rat,.Nv. 9-Dc.u
TruILEKS oeod Tee- .
Enrsdfid$fr nme)r kt
d kr
We. NU N.v 29FiIc
'3 !
A Roaring FRENCH Farce~
Wed.-Sat., Nov. 29-Dec. 2
Trueblood Theatre-S P.M.
! !
! r
! !
! Enclosed find $ for _(number)tickets
for each date checked below at the price circled.
r !
! Wed., Nov. 29 Fri., Dec. 1 !____
r !
* Thur., Nov. 30 Sat., Dec. 2
r !
! l___ enclosed a' self-addressed stamped envelope. Mail my
* tickets to me.
! !
! !
NAMF
* ADDRESS___

1

"'A camera happening. Imaginative effects that knock your

eyes out."

- N. Y. DAILY NEWS

"...One of the year's most important films."
- EVENING STAR NEWS, WASH., DC

Samuel Z. Arkoff & James H. Nicholson
present Roger Corman's Production of

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