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November 10, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-10

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THEEE

.:.

* Apollo Missile
Survives Fiery
Return to Earth

UAW Locals Picket
Despite 3-Year Pact

DETROIT (P)-A picket line
skirmish at Belvidere, Ill., in which
50 men were arrested highlighted
yesterday a series of local plant
work interruptions that slowed
Chrysler Corp. auto production to
a trickle.
Chrysler and the United Auto
Workers reached tentative agree-
ment Wednesday night on terms
of a new three year pact covering
95,000 production workers, but the

"In a couple of cases, such as
the Jefferson Assembly plant in
Detroit, we had a parts shortage
that caused some workers to be
kept off the jobs," Chrysler offi-
cials said.
The Belvidere incident was the
most serious as police tangled with
pickets who had extended their
lines five miles from the big new
plant and had barricaded all roads
leading to it.

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764-0058

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CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. ()-In a
spectacular debut, America's Sat-
urn 5 super-rocket hurled an un-
manned Apollo moonship 11,234
Miles into space yesterday and the
spacecraft survived a blistering
dive back through the earth's at-
mosphere to a parachute landing
in the Pacific Icean.
The splashdown followed a fiery
dash back through the atmosphere
in which the spacecraft reached
lunar return speed of nearly 25,000
miles an hour and had its heat
shield blistered by 5,000-degrees
re-entry temperatures.
The test demonstrated that the
Apollo ship can withstand the
searing re-entry heat that astro-
nauts will encounter in coming
home from the moon, one of many
significant achievements of the
momentous mission. The impact
occurred in the Pacific only 6
miles from the prime recovery ship,
the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Ben-
s nington after a flight of 8 hours,
37 minutes.
Cheers
Crewmen aboard the Bennington
cheered as they spotted the space-
craft floating down under its three
huge orange and white parachutes.
Aircraft were overhead imme-
diately and dropped divers into
the water to secure the craft.
The rocket worked with perfec-
tion and drilled a space vehicle
weighing a record 140 tons into
orbit. Included in the orbiting
weight was the still attached third
stage, which re-started after three
4 hours in space to boost Apollo A'
to the high altitude.
The combined weight of the
rocket and spacecraft that left the
pad today was 3,100 tons. The
Apolo craft that returned to earth
weighed just 10,600 pounds.
Shot in the Arm
The historic flight gave this na-
tion's man-in-space program a
much needed shot in the arm and
revived hopes that U.S. astronauts
can still land on the moon in this
decade.
With a thundering burst of
power, the most powerful rocket
ever assembled blasted away from
its launch pad at 7 a.m., EST., to-
day after a perfect countdown-
something that few people believed
possible for such a complex ma-
chine..
Thethree stages of the monster
Saturn 5 ignited with drill-like
precision during an 11-minute
boost phase and shoved the mas-
sive payload, including the still-
attached third stage, into orbit 115
miles high.
Three hours later, after two
orbits of the globe, the hydrogen-
powered third stage restarted its
engine on ground command and
propelled the 64,000-pound Apollo
4 vehicle outward toward a high
point of 11,400 miles.
Anxious Moment
The re-ignition of the third
4 stage gave flight controllers their
first anxious moments of the mis-
sion. A vent valve refused to re-
spond to commands to close, until
the last moment when it finally
closed.
The spacecraft separated from
the stage and a motor on board
W fired for 15 seconds to provide final
power to reach the planned alti-
tude. Had it burned a few seconds
longer, Apollo 4 could have gone
$o the moon, but that was not
STARTS SATURDAY
STOP WORRYINGI
HELP'
SISDN THE WAYK N

planned for today's flight because
of the need to test the heat shield
on re-entry.
An hour after the world's most
powerful rocket blazed away from
Cape Kennedy on its maiden test
flight, the Apollo program man-
ager, Air Forse Maj. Gen. Samuel
Phillips told newsmen:
Positive Course
"This mission will do a lot to get
the whole Apollo team mqving
again on a positive course. It will
do a lot for the progress in coming
months of the Apollo program.
"Yesterday," Philips said, "I
would have said that I think we
have a reasonably good chance of
accomplishing a manned lunar
landing by ths end of 1969. Today,
I think that reasonably good
chance is maybe a notch above
reasonably good."
The Apollo moon program has
been lagging since three astronauts
died in a spacecraft fire last Janu-
ary, on a pad not far from where
the Saturn 5 started its historic
flight.
Early Phases
Phillips described the early phase
of the flight as perfect. He said
the three stages of the powerful
booster performed "right on the
money" that the orbiting vehicle
was working fine.
He reported that a cheer went
up in the launch control center
when the Saturn 5 broke its earthly
ties and rumbled into the sky on
a massive tower of flame, vibrating
the ground for miles around.

.i

firm's labor problems continued on More Talks
a local level. Weary negotiators for

Chrysler

-Associated Press
DR. WERNHER VON BRAUN (center), describes as a "workhorse
rocket" the Saturn 5 missile which made a successful flight yester-
day. Seated with him are Rocco A. Petrone and Dr. Arthur
Rudolph,'both space flight officials.

"We had been scheduled to build
6,500 cars Thursday but we had
only one assembly line going and
will be lucky if we wind up with
400 cars for the day's output,"
commented a Chrysler public re-
lations man.
Three Days
UAW president Walter P. Reu-
ther said after the contract agree-
ment had been reached that it
would take two or three days to
get Chrysler back to normal pro-
duction.
The problem was that while the
national agreement had been
worked out, scores of local plant
issues remained to be settled.
Chrysler said a check at mid-'
morning yesterday showed about
40,000 Chrysler workers off the job
for various reasons with about 12
plants involved.

and the UAW, who went through a
marathon, 34 hour final bargaining
session that resulted in the tenta-
tive national agreement, returned
to the table yesterday afternoon
to resume discussions on pay rates
and working conditions for 8,000
salaried workers.
The Chrysler pact gives produc-
tion workers wage and fringe bene-
fit gains of over $1 an hour. The
average hourly straight time for
UAW workers was $3.41 before the
new round of agreements was
reached.
With the Ford and Chrysler
packages pretty well wrapped up,
Reuther was expected to turn his
attention - perhaps as early as
Monday-to General Motors, the
No. 1 auto maker in the world. He
was expected to demand from GM
the same basic package he won at
Ford and Chrysler.

I , . - J , a., ....... sv,.

TONIGHT and
TOMORROW
CINlEM"A I1
Presents
"SMILES OF A
SUMMER NIGHT"
Ingmar Bergman, Director
plus Chapt. 3-FLASH GORDON
7:00-9:15 P.M.
Aud. A-ANGELL HALL 50c

ISRAEL'S TURN:

Pro cedure Dispute
Causes UN Delay
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y.(AP) -A { berg argued that Israel as a party
long delayed meeting of the UN to the dispute should speak imme-
Security Council on how to settle diately after Egypt, which had
the Arab-Israeli conflict was fi- asked for the urgent meeting. So-
nally convened yesterday but im- viet Deputy Foreign Minister Vas-
mediately bogged down in a proce- ily V. Kupnetsov contended that
dural wrangle over when Israel Israel should speak seventh, be-
should speak. cause that was the order in which
U.S. Ambassador Arthur J. Gold- it had got on the speakers' list.

Wilson, Ref uses To Budge
On Credit, Deflation Policies,
I I 6$$ 996

LONDON {P)-Prime Minister
Harold Wilson refused last night
to compromise on his Labor gov-
ernment's policy of deflation de-
spite a growing revolt within his
own party and increasing unpop-
ularity in the nation.
Wilson told the House of Com-
mons, however, that full employ-
ment remained the Labor govern-
ment's objective.
The prime minister's statement
to the House was heralded earlier
in the day by a further tightening
of credit control when the Bank
of England raised its lending rate
for the second time in less than a
month.
The bank's discount rate, on
which all interest levies for lend-
ing are based, was raised from 51/2
to 6 per cent Oct. 19 and to 61/2
per cent yesterday, putting it close
to the "crisis level" of 7 per cent.
The action, by making credit
more expensive, may head off a
minor boomlet in industrial expan-
sion announced in the House Tues-

day night by Chancellor of the
Exchequer James Callaghan after
15 months of deflation-induced
business stagnation.
It seemed doubtful the govern-
ment's critics in the party would
let the matter rest there. They are
too alarmed about the govern-
ment's declining popularity in
opinion polls, accompanied by
steady losses of parliamentary
seats in special elections, often in
traditional Laborite strongholds.
Many are beginning to wonder
if the government's measures will
actually succeed in their long term
aim of renovating the economy
and also whether there.is still time
to reflate the economy and get
things booming before the 1971

Confrontation
The suspension delayed an ex-
pected confrontation b e t w e e n
Egyptian Foreign Minister Mah-
moud Riad and Israeli Foreign
Minister Abba Eban over whether
the first step for settlement of the
Arab-Israeli war of last June 5-10
should be withdrawal of Israeli
trops from Egypt, Jordan or Syria
or direct negotiations between Is-
rael and the Arabs.
Egyptian Ambassador Mohamed
Awad El Kony sent a letter to the
council president Tuesday' asking
for "an urgent session to consider
the dangerous situation prevailing
in the Middle East as a result of
the persistence of Israel not to
withdraw its armed forces from all
the territories which it occupied."
U.S. Resolution
A resolution sponsored by the
United States would have the spe-
cial representative "maintain con-
tacts with the states concerned
with a view to assisting them in

elections
The leftist weekly New States- the working out of solutions" con-
man pointed out that this will be sistent with its purposes.
the sixth successive year that Brit- One of the aims stated in the
ain's foreign trade has been in the U.S. resolution was "withdrawal
red, with every prospect that it of armed forces from occupied
will continue next year. It said territories.". Another was "ter-
devaluation of the pound is the mination of claims or states of
only answer. belligerence."

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