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November 07, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1967

TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7,1967

music Marijuana,
3erlin Octet ProfessionalLDSeized

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
"}}ti}: ":;:??t :1 A:":"'V}m i ti1'Y::l'":iti":'}: ti,:JY '}" }}. SY": ti :"'.:\.L }:":'::t :'.:::::y:f:" ""}:{." 1 "Ysf

::: ":'. ......::;:> ":":: < work in the third movement,
Program especially in those magical en-
trances after the violin solo that
timento in D major Mozart seemed to come up out of no-
Hindemith where, was breathtaking.
in F major Schubert One minor point should be made

tet

I

strings somehow managed a slight.
thinning of texture without audi-
bly diminishing the dynamic
level of their own important part.
A minor point, but nevertheless
an excellent example of the top-
notch musicianship that made
this concert a uniquely rewarding
one.
Just in passing, has the Uni-
versity ever considered maintain-
ing an "Octet in Residence?"

In Lansing

By JAMES SVEJDA
Someday an enterprising musi-
cologist will write thetdefinitive
treatise on those little extra-
musical aggravations that crop up
at every concert. Invariably, somej
idiot behind you simply must re-I
crumble that wad of cellophone.
And haven't there been times
when you were convinced that
every poor devil in a thirty-square
mile area who is suffering from
terminal smoker's-hack just had
to pick that very concert at which
to succumb?
My own favorite is thatszealous
soul who somehow feels com-I
pelled to pantomime its reactions
for my benefit. At the concert
given by the Berlin Philharmonic
Octet Sunday night I was ex-
posed to a past-master/ a woman
who sat a few rows ahead of me.
Every eight bars or so she
would turn to her escort, shake
her head sagely or make some
other similarly disparaging sign
with her hands (to be interpreted
variously as "What's wrong with
them?"; "Why couldn't we have
stayed home, like I wanted?";
"Why don't they DO some-
thing?").
Her contortions aroused two
emotions in me: the first, a com-
passioate urge to relieve her suf-
ferings with a baseball bat; the
second, sincere disbelief. For not
only did the Berlin Philharmonic
Octet "do something," they dis-
played that kind of expert, in-
telligent musicanship that must
certainly rank them as one of the
finest chamber ensembles that one
is ever likely to hear.
The Mozart Divertimento (K.V.-
136) was exquisite. Although the
opening Allegro was a shade on
the hasty side (I clocked it some-
where around 110), this was ex-
cellent Mozart: crisp, dynam-
ically vital in the outer move-
ments, with a warm, intensely
moving Andante.
The only reservation I would
make about the Hindemith Octet
has to do with the music itself.
Some of the shortcomings that
have caused that composer's
stock to decline in recent years
are apparent here. Generally, the
piece seems little more than an
overworked exercise in dissonant
counterpoint and as such, tends
to radiate an arid emotional
sterility.,
The Berliners' performance was
slick and un-apologetic, even to
the point of refusing to play down
the second movement's somewhat
embarrassing debt to the Stravin-
sky of the 20's. Here, clarinetist
Herbert Staehr was incredible. Hisi

about the performance of the
Schubert Octet. It concerns the
horn-bassoon dialogue .that oc-
curs about midway into the first
movement. To compensate for the
weaker voice of the bassoon, the

Court Refuses To Rule
On War Legality Issue

WASHINGTON (P)-Three Army
privates who were court-martialed
after they refused to be shipped
to Vietnam were denied a hearing
today by the Supreme Court. Hom-
ever, two of the justices suggested
that the case presents "questions
of great magnitude."
Justices Potter Stewart and Wil-
'U' Research
Hit By Change
In' DOD Policy
(Continued from Page 1)
cases where they would be re-
quired to enforce such restrict-
ions," explained Hobstetter.
The agencies will no longer en-
force classification upon contracts
which formerly restricted rights
to publications of research results,
according to Hobstetter. Nor will
they enforce classification on proj-
ects which required access to al-
ready-classified material.
On Substance
"In cases where universities ac-
cept contracts with classification
on the substance of the research
and the sponsoring agency fully
intends to enforce the classifica-
tion, 'then the policy will be no
different than before," Hobstetter
said.
"I am not familiar with univer-
sities that accept contracts with
classification on the substance of
the research. Most that I know
previously accepted classified con-
tracts so that the researcher could
have access to relevant informa-
tion or be able to attend closed
conferences," he added.
Hobstetter indicated that sev-
eral contracts have been renewed
at Pennsylvania in the last few
weeks in which classification re-
strictions have been dropped.
"We will have no classified con-
tracts remaining after a few
months," said Hobstetter.
Pennsylvania also r e c e n t 1 y
adopted a policy to a'ccept no
classified contracts after a bitter
two-year controversy over the
existence of bio-chemical warfare
i research on its campus.

Liam O. Douglas said that among
the questions which the case pre-
sented-and which they said the
court should have heard-are
whether present United States
military activity is in fact a war
within the meaning of the Con-
stitution and, if so, whether the
President may constitutionally or-
der the three "to participate in
that military activity when no war
has been declared by the Con-
gress."
War Crimes
The three privates claimed that
had they obeyed orders sending
them to Vietnam they would have
been guilty of war crimes. Thus,
they contended, the orders were
illegal.
The three are Dennis Mora, 26,
of New York City; David A. Samas,
21, of Modesto, Calif., and James
Johnson, 21, of New York City.
Douglas said "a host of problems
is raised. Does the President's au-
thority justify what has been
threatened?"
Stewart said that if the 1964
Gulf of Tonkin resolution "pur-
ports to give the chief executive
authority to commit the United
States forces to armed conflict
limited in scope only by his ab-
solute discretion, is the resolution+
a constitutionally impermissible
delegation of all or part of Con-
gress' power to declare war?"
On June 30, 1966 they brought
suit in federal court in Washing-
ton, in an effort to block their
shipment to Vietnam.
The suit was dismissed in dis-
trict court here July 11, 1966, with
a finding that "the propriety of
transferring a member of the arm-
ed forces from one part of the
world to another is not only po-
litical, but a military question over
which courts have no jurisdiction."
In their appeal to the Supreme
Court they contended the United
States is violating several treaty
obligations and assurances, includ-
ing the United Nations charter, by
its participation in the Vietnam
war.

State Police Arrest
Four Persons, Find
$170,000 in Drugs
Four persons, including one
Michigan State University stu-
dent, were arraigned yesterday
following weekend raids in Lans-
ing and East Lansing which net-
ted police some 45 pounds of
marijuana and viles of LSD
valued at $170,000.
The office of Ingham County
Prosecutor Donald Reisig identi-
fied the four persons, arrested in
two separate raids, as Elizabeth
M. Washburn, 24, William E.
Kahl, 27 and Robert L. Bortree,
21, and Robert S. Meyer, 22.
Kahl is a native of New Jersey,
but his present home and the
home of Miss Washburn were not
immediately learned. Kahl is a
former student at MSU. Arrested
earlier this year in Lansing Town-
ship for possession of marijuana,
Kahl was deported from Canada
for narcotics charges; he had
previously fled to Canada after
jumping bail. Kahl and Miss
Washburn were arrested in Lans-
ing.
Police confiscated 25 pounds of
marijuana, 13 caps of LSD, and
two bottles of liquid LSD in the
Lansing raid. The remainderof
the drugs was taken in an East
Lansing raid.
Bortree, presently a student at
MSU, was arrested with Meyer in
East Lansing. Assistant Prosecu-
tor Donald Huber said police
found marijuana in plastic bags
covering the back seat of a car
during the East Lansing raid.
Kahl and Meyer were charged
with sale and possession of nar-
cotics, and Bortree and Miss
Washburn with possession. All
four demanded examinations on
charges against them. Judge Wil-
liam Harman set bond at $5000
and $2000.
State police said the marijuana
came from Elkhart, Ind., for pro-
cessing and resale in the Lansing-
East Lansing area. Elkhart is the
hometown of Meyer.
According to police, the raids
recovered the largest amount of
narcotics confiscated in mid-
Michigan since 1959. A represent-
ative of the State News, student
paper at MSU, said this was the
second arrest in Ingham County
for possession of LSD. The first
was last week. "There have been
six or seven people arrested from
the East Lansing area this year
for possession of marijuana," she
added.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only,
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1967
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"Management of Managers No.
42": 146 Business Administration Build-
ing, 8:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to
9:00 p.m.
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Seminar-"Workshop for Pro-
grammers": Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
to 5:00 p m.
Science Research Club-Professor Wal-
do Tobler, Geography, "Topographic
Mapping from EarthSatellites," Pro-
fessor Dale McCullough, Natural Re-
sources, "Managing Deer for Maximum
Harvest," Rackham Amphitheatre, 7:30
p.m. There will be a brief business
meeting and refreshments.
UM Junior Year in France: An in-
formational meeting for freshmen and
sophomores interested in spending their
junior year in Aix-en-Provence, France,
will be held in Rooms 3-R and 3-S of
the Michigan Union at 7:30 p.m.
Center for South and Southeast Asian
Studies and the Department of History
Lecture-Professor A. L. Basham, Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, "Traditional
E I e m e n ts in Mahatma Gandhi's
Thought": East Conference Room,
Rackhamn Building, 8:00 p.m.
School of Music Lecture-Roger Ses-
sions, "Some Prevalent Misconceptions
Regarding Music and the Musical
World": Rackham Lecture Hall, 8:30
p.m.
Students that registered for the No-
vember series of Reading Classes are
reminded that classes begin.
General Notices
Additional Recreational Opportunities
for Women Students
Barbour Gymnasium is open for ac-
tivities for women students as follows:
Mondays and Wednesday, 12 noon to
1:00 p.m. Friday afternoons, 3:00-5:00.
Saturday mornings, 10:00-12:00. The
Open House on Tuesday night, 7:00-
9:00, is continuing.
History Department Lecture. Pro-
fessor Val R. Lorwin, University of
Oregon, "Comparative Study of the
Small European Democracies," Wednes-
day, November 8, Michigan Room of
the League, 8:00 p.m.
Freshmen who have received notice
of appointments to confer with repre-
sentatives of their high schools on
Thursday morning are urged to be
punctual.
IST Ocean Engineering Seminar Series
-Dr. Edward Wenk, Jr., Executive Sec-

retary of the National Council on
Marine Resources and Engineering De-
velopment, "Ocean Engineering: A New
and Challenging Discipline," Thursday,
November 9, Main Lecture Hall, Chrysler
Center for Continuing Engineering Edu-
cation, 2:30 p.m.
Recreational Leadership-Women Stu-
dents
A course in Recreational Leadership
will again be offered during the win-
ter term on Fridays 3 to 5 at the
Women's Athletic Building. This course
is designed to prepare young women
for camp obs and playground work.
Applications are available in Room
15, Barbour Gymnasium and at the
Women's Athletic Building. These must
be turned in by November 22nd. An in-
formative meeting will be held Thurs-
day. November 16 at 5:10 at the W.AT'
in order to answer questions about the
course.
Student Government Council for Daily
Official Bulletin: The approval of the
following student sponsored events be-
comes effective after the publication of
this notice. All publicity for these
events must be withhelduntil the ap-
proval has become effective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
Bursley Hall Student Council-Pep
Rally-Mixer-Nov. 3, 1967-8-12 p.m.-
Bursley Hall.
Doctroal Examination for:HowardLewis
(Continued on Page 8)
-

N NATIONALGENERAL CORORATION
U ~FOX EASTERN THEATRES MoCnday-Friday
FOI VILLAGE s s
SO ING PF H Sat -Sun:: 1:30 -
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769-1300 3:10-4:55-6:40-
8:20-10:00
AMGd 1presents
Jrw Winkler Producto
MARVIN
BLANK'"
a w .
co~str~ngAGIE ICKINON aturi
In Paavlsinn IMetrocolor 0MGM
Daily Classif ied Are Great!

0

9

'4

CINEMA II
presents
"SMILES
OF A
SUMMER
NIGHT"I
Ingmar Bergman, Dir.
plus Chapter 3
FLASH GORDON

SEROEI EISENSTEIN
FESTIVAL
Tonight and Tomorrow
7:00 & 9:05

0

ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

TEN DAYS THAT
SHOOK THE WORLD
(1928)
Eisenstein's vivid account of the events of the
Bolshevik Revolution of 1917.
Cinema Guild's showing of this great film coin-
cides with the 50th Anniversary of the Revolution,
Nov. 6-7, 1917.
Note: Tonight only there will be a special,
II P.M., showing of Alexander Nevsky.
STILL ONLY 50c

46,

Fri., Nov. 10

Aud. A,

Sat., Nov. 11 Angel Hall
7:00 & 9:15 P.M.
50c

m

es

Wednesday & Thursday

4:10 P.M.

Y.r.^:.:"C":+:"7::::.;ro rv:.;.};r: 4q{.-.:;.;.;r,.;.,.-ry.; .;.;rrr.: .;gr.,"r,:vv: ,:,}F?{.:"::?v'"T::J.?+S.S"':$:f"'i'2°{{1:";.}:":" :"v? ti;::{:"' ...
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ORGANIZATION NOTICES
r:. .-.".".".vr.:."+o. ."r.+."q?"Y.SitivP} ?4.;r.}g.}:S";rtiti,":.;tr;":":t".+::yv.}:"}a":??S+{r;}ti:5:":":$"::1"::"::{>.{ "' ''rti}:?{:ti'p':: Y;}?v +.:::'}.t;: °:?ti?:"Y":-.'"h'?:ti t

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
presents
CATHLEEN NI HOULIHAN
by William Butler Yeats
THE END OF THE BEGINNING

ISSIN IMPOSSIBLE
UNION-LE AGUE
\
VIETNAM~
why we can never win in South East Asia
MIKE WINTERS
correspondent for collegiate press service
Sponsored by- 10/2 months in Vietnam
UAC Contemporary Discussion
Nov. 8WEDNESDAY7:30 P.M.
UGLI MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
- -

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
room 1011 SAB.
* * *
UM Amateur Radio Club, invites all
interested students to attend its meet-
ing on Wednesday, Nov. 8, room 2080
East Engineering Bldg, at 7:00 p.m.
Bach Club meeting, talk by Dr.
Thomas Taylor on "The Concerto Idea
in Bach's Works", Wed. Nov. 8, 8:00
p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe, for fur-
ther information call 761-0699.
Concert Dance Organization is hold-
LAST 10 DAYS
MIOVING,
AND
-Wanda Hale,?
New York Daily News
Starts 11/17 -
"Taming of the Shrew"

ing modern dance classes every Tuesday
at 7:30 and Thursday at 8:15 in the
Barbour Gym Dance Studio. Classes are
held for men on Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
* * *
Graduate Assembly, general meeting,
Wed. Nov. 8, 7:30 p.m., East Conference
Room (fourth floor), Rackham Bldg.
Dean Spurr will be present for a discus-
sion of matters of interest to graduate
students.
Communication Sciences Lecture Ser-
ies, Nov. 7, 4:10 p.m., Michigan League-
Michigan Room, Speaker: Franco Pre-
parata, "Convolutional Transformation
and Resynehrdnizing Binary Sequences
by Finite Automata."
in JAMES CLAVEL'S
Shows of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9:10

by Sean O'Casey
November 8th & 9th

Admission Free

Arena Theatre, Frieze Building
- - - -- --- --

Ends
Wednesday

E-wx rw

Ends
Wednesday
2
Great Films
Encore!
*
*SUPERIOR OFF-BEAT, AND
ORIGINAL!'"N.Y. TIMES
COLUMBIA PICTURES
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES

I

i

W,

NEXT ATTRACTION

i

I

A PARAMOUNT PICTURE-TECHNICOLORS

Coming
Thursday

AMM

Starting
Thursday

Dial
NO 2-6264

-5' .

3

DIAL 8-6416
james H. Nicholson & Samuel Z. Arkoff
prmat Roger Corman's Production of
I40 p

DUTCHMAN
All the urgency and tension of the Award Winning play by le Roi Jones is now on film!
No ONE UNDER 18 YEARS oF AGE WILL BE ADMITTED. g nu -
Vth Forum

14

DAILY
SHOWS

Direct From It Roadshow Engagement - Every Ticket Holder Guaranteed A Seat
SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES- SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES
SEATS RESERVED
. & 1WNRA m0

::5
:
{::>«;
>

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Starting MitO O'SHEA - BARBARA JEFfORO
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11

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