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October 25, 1967 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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- PAGE TWO THE MIC1IIG~N UAJTV 1xTr1Th'rIc,1~ A~K7 £~F ?

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Black Population Boom Widens
Racial Separation in S. Afr ica

By DENNIS EE ROYLE
Associated Press Staff Writer
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa
White-r-uled South' Africa is
getting blacker every year as its
African Iiopulation explodes and
the country's economic growth be-
comes increasingly dependent on.
black labor.
Whites total 3,563,000 and Afri-
cans 12,750,000: By the year 2000,
South African authorities esti-
mate, the* racial division will have
widened to 20 million in favor of
the black.
Economists and politicians- en-
- visage grave problems if the black
population continues to outpace
whites in this racially segregated
country.
Racial Separation
South Africa's policy demands
separation of races on all eco-
nomic, industrial and cultural
levels. The government's ultimate
aim is to contain Africans in
areas known as Bantustans, semi-
autonomous segregated reserves
well away from"white areas, where
blacks will live and work under
white government administration..
South Africa's 1,859;000 coloreds,
or, mixed bloods, and 500,000 As-
iant face the same future. Prime
Minister Balthazar J. Vorster be-
lieves that' apartheid-race seg-
regation-is the only way to insure
long-term.®.racial harmony in a
country where the -ruling whites
are outnumbered four to. one.
What- worries government offi-
cials is that the rapidly increasing,
black population is not only num-
erically swamping the white .min-
-ority, but over the years -has be-
come integrated in the country's
booming white-run industries.
South Africa's black worker al-
ways has been regarded as a unit
of labor.. Denied a voice in trade
union affairs andpolitical life, he

forms a vast army of cheap labor.
Ultimate apartheid calls for ex-
clusion of Africans from the white
areas and white industry. But
South Africa's growing economy,
its . scarcity of white workers and
utilization of cheap black labor
is hindering the government's im-
plementation of total racial seg-
regation.,
"The time must come when
Bantu African labor will be avail-
able to no one in the republic,"
says Blaar. Coetzee, deputy min-
ister of Bantu administration.
African Labor
"The white man who believes
that he can plan his future under
the impression that cheap black
labor will always be available is
wrong. The time will come when
none is available."
But many industrialists and
businessmen disagree. White civil-
ization and industrial growth in
South Africa can survive only if
adequate black labor is available
for its expanding industries, they
say.
Cheap black labor is the back-
bone of South Africa's economy.
Thousands of Africans toil on the
farms, in factories and deep below
ground . extracting the country's
mineral wealth.
Most menial, low-salaried jobs
are.. performed by Africans for
whites. Few. white families are
without at least one servant. The
wealthy have three or four.
Even the white mailman has an
African to carry his heavy bag.
A system of job reservation in-
sures white workers of reasonable,
well-paid employment. It doesn't
allow the ambitious black to ele-
vate himself by his own efforts
into, the white man's job and keeps
him low on the financial ladder.
Few can visualize life in South
Africa without black labor. But

the government is adamant in its
declared intention that the flow
of black labor to the white cities
and farms must be halted and
eventually turned b a c k, even
though there are insufficient
whites now to fill vacancies in
skilled and semiskilled positions.
There is growing dissatisfaction
among white farmers who, under
the terms of government legisla-
tion, must cede some 3.1 million
acres to make way for Bantu
homelands, the Bantustans.
Some are unwilling to hand over
fertile farmlands which have been
in their families for generations.
Die Transvaler, the Afrikaans
language newspaper which is the
mouthpiece of the ruling Nation-
alist party, warned whites they
would have to abandon, the use
of black labor eventually, or face
the consequences of what they
term "black-white equalization."
"We must discard our depend-
ence on black labor. It is the only,
choice for the whites of this coun-
try if they wish to maintain white
civilization," the paper said.
Economists point out that if the
government persists in its policy
of total territorial apartheid, the

white population
in the long run.

may well suffer

Research Protested
By Princeton's SDS

Musket Tours
Korea's DMZ
(Continued from Page 1)
Korea, at Camp Stanley, the show
had to rely on truck headlights
for its lighting when a power
blackout occurred.
The Armed Forces Korean Net-
work c a r r i e d "Entertainment
USA" on video-tape for those who
had been unable to be at any of
the performances. This is the
largest armed forces network in
the world.
In Japan, the MUSKET troupe,
performed in hospitals where;
Vietnam victims were being treat-
ed, receiving a personal letter af-
terward from one of the hospital's
commanding officers, thanking
them for contributing "significant-
ly to the patients' morale"
In the city of Tachikawa, the
group played to a standing-room-
only crowd at the American civil-
ian club there.
Along with Korea and Japan,
the MUSKET troupe conquered
military installations in Iwo Jima,
Okinawa, Taiwan, the Philippines
and Guam.
Wednesday, Nov. 1, it plans to
do the same to Ann Arbor at 8
p.m. in Hill Auditorium.

Young Dems
Back Move
To Beat LBJ
By GREG ZIEREN
The University Young Demo-
cratic Club last night passed a
resolution which declared the or-
ganization "opposed to the nomi-
nation of Lyndon Johnson as
President of the United States,"
following similar action by the'
state convention of Young Dems
last Sunday.
The resolution criticizes Presi-
dent Johnson for "prosecuting an
unjust war in Vietnam," for neg-
lecting the country's social wel-
fare and for "reversing the trend
of progress which has always typ-
ified the Democratic Party."
In addition, the resolution urges
delegates to the 1968 Democratic
National Convention "to nominate
a presidential candidate who sup-
ports the 1964 platform of the
Democratic Party."
Cecily Becker, Grad, was elected
president for the coming year last
night. Elected executive vice-
president was Peter Mikelson, '68;
administrative vice - president,
Lynn Rothschild, '69; secretary,
Stephen Spitz, '68; and treasurer,
Jared Stamell, '68.
State Central Committee repre-
sentatives elected are Mike Cole,
'68L; Dave Copi, '68L; Jean Fealk,
'70; Judy Greenberg, '68; Howard
Hedeman, '69; Bernie Stolberg,
'67; Chuck Tobias, '70L; and Barb
Wilson, '70.
In reference to the adoption of
the resolution, Miss Becker said.
"This was a great step forward in
the battle within the Democratic
Party to change our foreign
policy." She also added that the
resolution "indicates the growing
discontent with the President's
policy among loyal Democrats."
Miss Becker announced the ten-
tative plans for a Young Denis
reception for Senator Eugene Mc-
Carthy (D-Minn) on Nov. 1 in the
Union. McCarthy will be in Dun-
dee for the annual Second Con-
gressional Dinner, and has been
suggested by some Democrats, in-
cluding Weston E. Vivian, former
congressman from the second dis-
trict, as a possible alternative to
President Johnson in 1968.
Phone 434-0130
Sn,, CRPENTER ROAD
OPEN 6:30 P.M.
FREE HEATERS
- "FRP NK AND
OUTSPOKEN!"
-Redbook Magazine
The BOUITING BROTHERS Prouctio
the
family
TECHNICOLOR®- FROM WARNER BROS.
with ROD TAYLOR

ORGANIZATION NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN- Graduate Assembly, general meeting.
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially Wed., Oct. 25, 7:30 p.m. East Con-
recognized and registered student orga- ference room (fourth floor), Rackham
nizations only. Forms are available in Bldg. Agenda to include: "Graduate
Rmn. 1011 SAB, Students and the Draft," "The Role
* * * of Graduate Students in University
Policy Making."
College Republican Club, exec. board L h ,*
meeting, Oct. 25, 7:00 p.m., 2535 SAB. University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
* * * Washtenaw. Wed. Oct. 25, 10:00 p.m.-
Mass College Weekend meeting. Thur., Mid-week devotion with Pastor Kapfer.
Oct. 26, 7:30 p.m., in the Assembly Hall* *
of the Michigan Union. UM Scottish Country Dance So-
** ciety, dance meeting every Wednesday,
Engineering Council, meeting, Oct. 8-10:30 p.m., WAB lounge.
26, 7:00 p.m., SAB 3511.* *
* * * UM Rifle Club, invites you to learn
Young Friends, another weekend T- to shoot every Wednesday, .7-9 p.m.,
group experience at Friend's Lake Com- ; ROTC Range.
munity. Oct. 27-29, 8:00 - meet at
Friends meeting house, 1420 Hill.mBring Deuscher Verein, kaffeestunde, every
sleeping bags if possible. Wednesday 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Blge.
- - - - - -

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Shows at 1, 3, 5,'7, 9:07.~

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Monday -_Friday-
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Saturday - Sunday
2 - 5:10 - 8:30 p.m.

--

(Contlnued from Page 1)
police arrived and carried the stu-
dents to a bus which police had
rented to take them to jail.
The demonstration culminated
a drive by SDS to point out to
students how they and Princeton
were contributing to the war
effort. "Students here do not feel
personally involved in issues like
this," Peters commented. "Only a
smallbody of students have been
moved by the presence of IDA.
We hope this protest will generate
greater concern.
Original protest followed publi-
cation of an article in the student
newspaper describing the work of
IDA. SDS had engaged in several
protests in recent weeks and cap-
ped its drive-with Monday's dem-
-onstration.
- Some members 'of the' faculty
have expressed support for pro-
testors. A petition circulated by
one professor asking IDA to leave
the campus was signed by several:
dozen faculty members. The issue

was discussed at a faculty meeting
Monday night, but no action was
taken. Some of the faculty were
present at Monday's demonstra-
tion. None were arrested.
Peters indicated that there were
no immediate plans for further
demonstrations. He will try, how-
ever, to get the backing of the un-
dergraduate assembly. "This will
be new for the assembly," he
pointed out. "They usually don't
consider things like this."

~~ ~ ~-~~-~---- - ~~~ ---~~

wl

E

ENDING
TON IGHT

TUES.-WED.-OCT. 24-25
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
constantly flashing from melodrama to comedy, the film'"n
thrills the viewer and teases him to outguess the master
of intrigue. With Michael Redgrave & Dame May Whitty.
Thursday: "OKLAHOMA"

A OFBRTWISE PROMU~ON
STEVE MCQUEEI
RICHARD ATTENDORODOHRR ICHARD CER CAMAlCE RERIEN
MARAYAT ANDRIANE. RiOBRWISE ' R0ER~fTNDERSON -IRICHARD "MK[NNAi EERRYOLDSMITFI
ORIGINAL SOUNO TRACK AL.BUM AMl ARGYLE SOLAR PRODULCTIONS PICTURE FILMED IN PANAYiSIORO -CD(OR BY DELUXE
ON 20TH CENTURY-FOX RECOROS.
DON'T WRITE HOME!
Send-
764-0058

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"ABSOLUTE DELIGHT!"
-Detroit Free Press

"CAPTIVATES!"
-Doily

"WARM GLOW!"
Detroit News

The Royal
Entertainment
Of The
Year
.. For the first time, motion picture cameras
have been permitted to roam the magnificent
chambers of England's royal and historic
palaces and of such treasuries of the
national heritage as the Tower of London.
Over one thousand years of British history come
to living life in this unprecedented exploration
of Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle, St. James'
Palace, Hampton Court, Kensington Palace
and Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh.
A truly regal experience.
A truly memorable motion picture event!
" Palaces of a Queen' .. .A SUCCESSION OF SUPERB
VIEWS and scenic beauty . . . the palaces,
as well as history, come alive. The Rembrandts, the Leonardos,
the Vermeers take on brilliance and perspective.
THE PRICE IS RIGHT AND THE TRIP IS
WORTHWHILE!"
-A. H. Weiler, New York Times
PALACES
OFA
QUEN

4w

I

BY A STRIKING AND ORIGINAL TRAGI-COMEDY
STUDS TERKEL

40 40 A -1

...

F . n ..,.: 1 1 .0. S. in -we ... % ..3. _...% ..0 ', oft r% 4- 1

11

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