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October 22, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-22

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

QTT'ATT% A lcr n lft Cat'! n *! n w .

__ IC I A IAI

SUiNDAY, OCTOBR 22 , 1967

r

MASS ARRESTS BEGIN:
Protests Reach Pentagons

Anti-War Rallies Hit Paris,
Tokyo, West Berlin, London

LBJ Approves Stricter Curbs
On Capitol Hill Demonstrations

strators penetrated the Pentagon
before the advance was halted.
Moving in an apparently co-
ordinated effort, the demonstra-
tors repeatedly tried unsuccess-
fully to outflank the troops. The
breakthrough came along a line
of advancing MPs near the
sparsely-guarded right stairway
entrance to the mall.
The column. of demonstrators
succeeded in forcing some of their
members through the Pentagon
press door about 60 yards from
the main entrance. Soldiers from
Fort Belvoir, Va., repelled the at-
tack with rifles drawn in a bloody
free-swinging melee.
Following apprehension of the
demonstrators who entered the
building, the troops pushed the
.remaining 1500 demonstrators on-
to the mall directly in front of
the door where a sit-in continued
into the night.
By 10:30 p.m. there were ap-
proximately 1800 demonstrators
.continuing the vigil at the mall,
while the central area in front of
the press door !,contained about
400 individuals.

Asst. Sec. of Defense Richard
Fryklund announced that official
injury totals had reached 27,
breaking down into 13 civilians,
8 federal marshalls, and 6 sol-
diers. Those seriously injured
were being taken to Walter Reed
Army Hospital and to Arlington
T Hospital.
After 9 p.m., the somewhat re-
stive quiet on the Pentagon walls
was being sporadically punctu-
ated by skirmishes between dem-
* onstrators and federal troops. At
around 10:30 p.m., six demon-
strators were clubbed and wres-
tled to the ground by marshalls
after a slight shoving match had
started between particularly vol-
uble sitters-in and the MPs.
Inside the Pentagon, Lieut. Gen.
John Trockmorton, commander of
the 3rd Army and the man who
supervised the riothtroops this
summer in Detroit, was aiding
Chief of Staff General Harold K.
Johnson as a special assistant.
O'Malley denied charges that.
his troops had used tear gas to
subdue rampaging crowds around

twilight. Some newsmen encoun-
tered the gas while following the
charging demonstrators as they
approach the building. O'Malley
intimated that one tear gas ,an-
ister had been activated by some
of the demonstrators, while news-
men on the scene insisted that the
shot had come from the govern-
ment side.
F'rykland refused to confirm or
deny a rumor spreading among
demonstrators that two MPs had
defected to their side but said the
Defense Deparment was "looking
into the matter."
On the scene for the Justice
Department was Asst. Att. Gen.
Warren Christopher. Att. Gen.
Ramsey Clark made a number of
short visits to the Pentagon
throughout the day. It is the Just-
ice Department that has jurisdic-
tion over the federal marshalls,
who were specially deputized.
No word was forthcoming on tie
duration of the vigil, which had
erupted in enthusiastic applause
and cheering when approximately
forty individuals rose to burn what
were purported to be draft cards.

(Continued from Page 1)
Thompson gave the group of
11 Russians representing various
Soviet groups texts of a speech by
President Johnson and a news
conference with Secretary of State
Dean Rusk explaining the reason
for U.S. presence in Vietnam.
* In West Berlin, an estimated
9,000 marched, headed by about
80 Americans who live there. The
Americans carried a U.S. flag.
Effigies of Johnson were burned
at Hamburg and Goettinger, and
3,000 Germans staged a sit-down
near the U.S consulate in Munich
but dispersed without incident.
Police tried repeatedly to open
the way for traffic, but about 1,000
of the marchers, most of them.
youths, refused to move. The po-
lice then brought six water can-
nons into play, sweeping demon-
strators, passersby and the fronts;
of some of the best cafes and
shops in the city.
Helmeted police charged the
crowd. Motorcycle police roared
back and forth. Pockets of dem-
onstrators, soaking wet and shout-
ing "Ho-ho-ho Chi Minh" moved,
into side streets to wait out the
police sweep.
Police said eight persons were
arrested and several injured.
* Possibly as many as 30,000
marched in a Communist-led
demonstration in Paris. About 50
Americans took part in that pa-
rade. The protestors carried a
20-foot-long banner proclaiming
"Solidarity with the forces of
peace in the United States."
* About 30 placard-waving Is-
raeli Communists staged a noisy
protest outside the U.S. Embassy
in Tel Aviv. Leaflets demanding
cessation of U.S. bombing were
handed out to the crowd.
* The Japanese Peace for
Vietnam Committee mustered a
crowd of some 2,000 for a parade
in front of the U.S. Embassy in
Tokyo. The crowd, of leftist
youths, housewives, educators and
pacifists displayed placards and
shouted "Dump hydrogen bombs,"
"Yankee, go home" and "We op-
pose Vietnam war."
0 In Copenhagen, about 15,000

ended with a brief outburst in
front of the American Embassy.
Another 15,000 persons in Am-
sterdam marched in protest
against the war. A message was
sent to Johnson to 'stop bombing
now." Protests also were held in
Madrid, Antwerp, Brussels, Cal-
cutta, Halifax and Ottawa.
h A downpour in, London kept
the Trafalgar Square crowd down
to about 700. A group of pickets
paraded outside the U.S. Embassy
in GrosvenorSquare with anti-
war banners aloft.I
" Meanwhile, North Vietnam
Premier Pham Van Donz describ-
ed American antiwar demonstra-
tors as companions in arms.
A statement broadcast from
Hanoi quoted the premier as de-
claring: "The Vietnamese people
thank their friends in America
and wish them great success in
their mounting movement."
The official Vietnam News
Agency quoted the premier as tell-
ing a visiting group of Americans,
headed by Thomas Hayden, for-
mer editor of The Daily, there
was a solidarity between the
Vietnamese and American peoples
in "the common struggle against
the aggression against Vietnam{
by the U.S. government.

WASHINGTON (P)- As thou-
sands of anti-war demonstrators
gathered here yesterday President
Johnson signed an act increasing
penalties for unauthorized dem-
onstrations or activities on the
Capitol grounds and in all con-
gressional buildings.
Fines up to $5,000 and jail
terms of five years could be im-
posed for carrying firearms, ex-
plosives or dangerous weapons on
the Capitol grounds or in any of
its buildings.
Unauthorized parades, picket-
ing or other violent or disorderly
conduct could bring fines of $500
and six months in jail.
The legislation, amending laws
that date back 100 years, was
pushed through the House last
Wednesday with some members
claiming it was aimed, at the
demonstration.

This was the bill signed by the,
President.
Majority Leader Mike Mansfield'
(D-Mont.) and Minority Leader
Everett M. Dirksen (R-Ill.) team-
ed up to get prompt Senate pass-r
age of the security measures af-
ter two recent Senate incidents.
They said existing laws failed
to provide adequate penalties for
youthful anti-war demonstrators1
who tossed leaflets onto the Sen-,
ate floor from a public gallery.
Other senators cited a sit-down
staged by welfare recipients at
a hearing by the Senate Finance
Committee in protest against pro-
visions of a Social Security bill
Members of Congress said they
THURSDAY'
October 26th

discovered that old laws intended
to assure orderly procedures for
Congress applied only to the
the Senate and House chambers,
Capitol grounds and not inside
the Capitol building or the Sen-
ate and House office buildings
and hearing rooms.
The new law prohibits disorder-
ly or disruptive conduct, loud,
threatening or abusive language,
or acts of physical violence.
Phone 434-0190
Eft aOLCARPENTERROAD
OPEN 6:30 P.M.
FREE HEATERS

Speaker John McCormack (D-
Mass.) took the floor to deny this,
saying it was a coincidence that
the special additional security for
Congress happened to come up
for action this week. I
The House approved the bill by:
a 323-20 margin and then sub-
stituted a similar measure passed
by the Senate on a voice vote.

drama
Oh Sweet, Football Saturday

NOW 1M'I0

DIAL
8-6416

By LLOYD GRAFF
A football Saturday at Michigan
is fluff, fakery, and folly in de-
lightful excess. Add Homecoming
rah rah and a rich fall sun, and
you have whipped cream with a
whipped cream topping.
The sugariness of homecoming
was contrasted by thoughts of the
Washington confrontation, but
the far off protests hardly abated
the fresh relaxation.
As football Saturdays go, it was
routine but sweet. The Wolver-
' ines kept things close, which is
about all you can ask from a
Michigan team these. days. Den-
nis Brown showed a flair at quar-
terback in his first start. He took
a fearful - beating"trying to turn
the Indiana flanks, but proved
durable. He axed the theory that
he could run but not throw by
completing 18 of 31 passes.
But Brown's acumen as a lead-
er was. never tested, as Coach
Bump Elliott called every play, a
degrading and condescending way
of running an amateur football
team. College football develops
leadership ability, of course.
Not only Brown operated as El-
liott's mouthpiece in the huddle.
On defense, Dennis Morgan and
Frank Wedge played musical
chairs as they shuffled defensive
signals in and out. One must
conclude that the coaches think
that their players are incompe-
tent field tactitians. After four
straight losses some of the players.

undoubtedly think the same of
their coaches.
But Michigan showed some fire
and pizzazz despite the ever pres-
ent prompting from the sidelines.
John Gabler, who reportedly' has
been in official disfavor because
of ego enlargement,, played a su-
perb game at flanker, driving the
Indiana secondary batty on short
patterns. Tom Curtis was flashy
at defensive back, and Jon
Kramer exhibited s o m e long
sought toughness at defensive
end..
But the game is just one facet
Iof the spectacle. The Homecom-
ing Queen, Opal Bailey, accepted
her dozen American Beauty
Roses without sneezing, though
her escort was clearly the most'
resplendent member of the en-
tourage in his irridescent green
slacks. The members of her Court
were elegantly well pressed. They
wore hokey rhinestoneddtiaras
which, hopefully, will be donated
to some worthy youngsters for
Halloween use.
The Michigan Band played
with characteristic elan and pol-
ish. The alumni band with stiff
backs and stiff lips held their
own with the 1967 version on the
old standards. Perhaps the high-
light of the show came when the
General, William Revelli, his blue
perch supported by two uniform-
ed bandsmen, led "Hurrah for
the Yellow and Blue." Revelli,
white gloves, white baton, black

uniform, erect and intense, sang
out the words to the crowd. He
was one of the few in the Sta-
dium who knew more than the
first two lines and the line about
reeling "in the rollicking crew"
The Indiana Band lags behind
the Hoosier football team in level
of improvement. Their sound was
tinny, and their program, "Songs
about Love," trite. And every
bandsman looked like he had a
size eight hat on a size six head.
Two helicopters circled the'
Stadium, one advertising whiskey,
the other a tavern. Football
brews a powerful thirst.
And as the throng dreamily
promenaded from Michigan Sta-
dium it really didn't seem to mat-!
ter much who won or lost. It
probably would have, if it hadI
rained.

PLEASE NOTE:
SUNDAY SHOWS AT 1:15-3:45-6:35-9:00
MONDAY SHOWS AT 6:40 AND 9:00
SUN.-MON.-OCT. 22-23
MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI'S
This story of Italy's idle rich established Antonioni as one
of the leading directors In the world and is a provocative
statement about modern society. All-Time Film Great.
TUES.-WED.--OCT. 24-25
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
THE LADYnSE
constantly flashing from melodrama to comedy, the film
thrills the viewer and teases him to outguess the master
of intrigue. With Michael Redgrave & Dame May Whitty. m
Coming Thursday: "OKLAHOMA"

SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES
SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES
MATINEES 1 :15 - 4:50
EVENINGS 8:30
NO SEATS RESERVED
Every Ticket Holder Guaranteed A Seat
SAND
PEBBLES
A 889gR 00000WIE 1WDCO
STEVE MCQUEEN
RICHARD ATTENIORO VII
RICHARD CRENHA
CANDICE ERDEN FRA TANDRIANE
ROBERT WISE: ROBERIANDERSON." RICHARD McKENNA
BORIS LEVEN.JERRY GOLDSMITH
Ml ARGUM SLAR PROOUCtIONPICTn~UR -FIED M PANAVOWI
COLOR it DELUXE
THURSDAY at the
STATE Theatre

TECHNICOLOR

Barbara Steele Peter Baldwin
PLUS..
x - E WAS A
MAN ON
THE LAM!
IN
RICHARD LONG

4

joined the antiwar protest, which

DIRECT FROM ITS ROADSHOW ENGAGEMENT!
SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES
SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCES f NO SEATS RESERVED

1

I

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATrION
5th AND FOX EASTERN THEATRE i*
FINAL WEEK FOX VILLGE
375No.MAPLE RD.-"769-1300

Feature Times
Monday - Friday
8:30 p.m. only
Saturday - Sunday
2 - 5:10 - 8:30 p.m.

5 ACADEMI
"BEST FOREIGNI
"BEST DIRECTOR
"BEST ORIGINAL
"BEST ART DIRECTII
WINNER N.Y. FILM
"BEST FOREIGN LANGU
"BEST FILM OF THE'
-avid Stavitt. Newsweek Maga
-John Vorheos, Seattle Post int
- Philip T. Hartung, Conmmonwee
.Thomas Quinn Curtiss. Paris Ec

Vth FORUM
Proudly Presents a
FELLINI FILM FESTIVAL
NOW, SHOWING
Y AWARD NOMINATIONS! Three stories of the sexes...somewhat different,
LANGUAGE FILM OF THE YEAR!" somewhat daring, somewhat delicious'
JOSEPH E.LEVINE
STORY AND SCREENPLAY
WRITTEN DIRECTLY FOR THE SCREEN"
ON!"S6 "BEST COSTUME DESIGN!"e
CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD!
JAGE FILM OF THE YEAR!"
YEAR!"
An. Produced by
digYnerdb CARLO PONTI EASTMAN COLOM
An Embassy Pictures Release

JULIE ANDREWS-MAX VON SYDOW-RICHARD HARRIS
ioK RGEORGE ROY HLL WALTER MAIRISCH PRODUCTION -e"HAWAII"ANAYISION- OW 1wDc.m
"'TO SIR, WITH LOVE' IS ENTERTAINMENT
OF THE WARMEST SORT, SO RIGHT THAT
YOU WOULD STAND UP AND CHEER!"
-Archer Winsten, New York Post

COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
SIDNEY
POITIER
In JAMES CLAVEL'S
PRODUCTION OF-
"To Sm,
O IH
LOVE,,

"A colorful, kicky
movie in the
mod mood!"
-Good Housekeeping Magazine
"PICTURE OF
THE MONTH!"
-Seventeen Magazine
"Sidney Poitier
just perfect
Will enthrall you!"
-Cosmopolitan Magazine
JUDIY G[ES8N - CHRITIAN ROB[RTS Intrducie8
SUZY t~ KE I1- THlE "MINDBENDERS' "LUU
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9:07
DIAL 5-6290

NRERI WE NMODCIr.W...N
STEVE MCOOEEI
RICHARD ATTERBOROURH"RICHARO CREIA C"IUICEDBERIEN
MAiiri ANDRIANE. ROSERi WISE R08ERTANDERSON RICHARD McIENNA.BoRIS LEVtn-J.aYGOSMITH
ORIGINAL SOVNO TRACK ALBUM AN ARGYLE-SOLAR PROOUCTKANS PICIDR(.FiKNEO INi PAtiA4SIOii* 'COOR BY DEUXE
ON 20TH CENTURY.FOX RECOR'S.
NO 2-6264
THURS., OCT.26
COLUMEIA Pi=FURESor... r.r
JIM R HUTTON DOO HOVINE'MILTN BERLE'-JOED IHP
,AUERBRNA
UNDAYrgramTODAY
<.Y. nuu1:10
<" ;,. ". r: " :* si'' :r K 3:10
Mi~ ~5:10
x . .7:15
SUNDAY Program
Matinees Information b
are not a
continuous NO 2-6264

FEDERICO FELLINI'S
.bMARCELO MASTROMIICLAUDIA CARDINALE-ANOUK AIMEE-SANDRA MILO
ROSSS A FALK-BARBARA STEEE LS OZoWmU wMamB. .
Showtimes -f---N---
Friday, October 20-7 and 9:30 p.m.
Monday; October 23-7 and 9:30 p.m.

it has
glamour,
sophistication,
color, wit
and
.sensuality lI"L
i -Bosley Crowthier,
New York Times

"TheRAFFW
starring
the Acade"y
Award Winnet
SOPHIA
LOREN
Directed by
M~rOWI
PeSICA

d + f ' 11' + ! It f

"COMPOSED OF MANY BRILLIANT SCENES,
A POWERFUL CLIMAX! MISS MASINA GIVES
A PERFORMANCE RARELY APPROACHED

"Boudoirable!I
Loren, 'Schneider
and Sexberg
made you
wish
you had
six eyes 1"
.Walter Wincheff

" eTEMATION~
oIDr.ANTONlW"'
starring
EKBERG
Directed by
FEDERICO
FELLINI
PEPPINO
De FILIPPO

=AY TUC t-DCCVlP

I

*

-N.Y. Herald Tribune
' G IUL L IE T T A . .
MASIN A
'in FEDERI CO
I ELLINI'S
(AB

'Sex Goddesses
Sophia Loren,
Anita Ekberg and
Romy Schneider
give highly
lerotitillating
performances."
"-Time Magazine

...The JOB
starring
ROMY
SCHNEIDER
Directed by
F . fir 4 SO SveARRgg ylASO WVgY
THOMAS ROMOL@
For persons over 18 years of age,'

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