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October 21, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-21

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SATUI RDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SATURDAY. OCTOBER 21, 1967 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

Seven

Found

Guilty
Trial

Poverty Bill STORMY CONFERENCE:
401*rtIy

-W uk Is 70

In

Mississippi

Deadlock On
Three Cases
Unresolved
Guilty Verdict First
Of Kind in Mississippi
Since Reconstruction
MERIDAN, Miss. (A)-A deputy
sheriff, a Ku Klux Klan leader and
five other men were convicted by
an all-white jury yesterday of
conspiracy charges in the 1964
slaying of three young civil rights
workers.
Eight defendants were acquitted.
The jury of seven women and five
men, who had deliberated more
than 14 hours, reported a hopeless
deadlock in the cases of three
others.
The convictions marked the first
time in Mississippi since Recon-
struction that any jury had re-
turned a guilty verdict in a major
civil rights case.
Those found guilty included De-
puty Sheriff Cecil R. Price and Ku
Klux Klan leader Samuel H. Bow-
ers Jr. Sheriff Lawrence A. Rainey
was among the acquitted. Ethel G.
"Hop" Barnette, the, Democratic
nominee for sheriff, was one of
three on whom the jury failed to
reach a decision.
The seven convicted were found
guilty of conspiring to deprive the
three victims of their civil rights.
The federal charge grew out of the
murders of Michael Schwerner,
24, Andrew Goodman, 20, both
white New Yorkers, and James
Chaney, 22, a Meridian Negro, near
Philadelphia, Miss. Conviction car-
ries a maximum penalty of 10
years in prison, and a $5,000 fine.
No state charges have ever been
filed in the case.
Judge Cox ordered two of those
convicted, Deputy Sheriff Price
and Alton Wayne Roberts, former
part-time Meridian night club
bouncer, taken into custody im-
mediately and placed in Hinds
County jail at Jackson, Miss., a
repository for federal prisoners.
The three men involved in the
mistrials were permitted to remain
free under their $5,000 bonds.
Trial of the 18 defendants, all
white, came after a three-year in-
vestigation by the FBI. Testimony
in the trial that began Oct. 9 re-
vealed that the FBI had paid a
total of $25,000 to informants for
information on the Klan and the
workers' deaths.
Horace Doyle Barnette's state-
ment to the FBI named "Jim Jor-
dan" as the man who shot Chaney.
Barnette renounced his statement
but it was admitted into evidence
after the names of other defend-
ents we're omitted from the text.
Cox allowed the jury to consider
the statement only in Barnette's
case.

i
To Stress
Local Role
House Fight Expected
Over High Spending
Of OEO Program '
WASHINGTON (R) - An anti-
poverty bill that would put more'
c o n t r o l over the community-
action programs in the hands of
local officials was approved yester-
day by the House Education and
Labor Committee.
After months of struggle, includ-
ing sessions lasting until midnight
this week, the committee finally
adopted a bill expected to bring on
an even fiercer fight on the House
floor.
The bill would -authorize a two-
year extension of the several an-
tipoverty programs administered
by the Office of Economic Op-
portunity at a funding level of
$2.06 billion.
Amendments Defeated
Approval was by voice vote after
the Democrats had used their 19-!
12 majority to roll over most
amendments put forward by the
Republicans.
The proposed spending level is
not regarded as realistic even by
the most optimistic of the bill's'
supporters. The economy-minded
House has already served notice
it intends to slash deeply into the
program when it gets a chance.
Drastic changes in other parts
of the bill are possible when the
House takes it up in two or three
weeks. Republicans and conserva-
tive Democrats have combined to
maul the OEO at every opportu-
nity recently, even voting to de-
prive its employes of a federal pay
raise that would go to every other
agency.
Tighten Local Control
It was in hopes of blunting some
of this opposition that the com-
mittee voted to tighten state and
local control over community-I
action programs, the most contro-
versial feature of OEO activity.

GAP Governors Block

Support
ABOARD SS INDEPENDENCE said)
(A')-Republican governors block- every
ed a Democratic effort yesterday Wh
to have the nation's governors de- Gov.
clare themselves "committed to was
the successful conclusion of the with
struggle for freedom in Southeast confe
Asia." tion..
At a stormy session of the 59th ed 31
National Governors Conference, Repu
each side accused the other of suspe
playing partisan politics with the As
Vietnam war. was
Texas Gov. John Connally, a resoli
Democrat, likened the GOP gov- to re
ernors who prevented action on I nated
the measure to dissenters who he dent

World News

-Associated Press
THE FOREMAN OF THE JURY that convicted seven men of conspiracy in the slaying of three civil
rights workers, Langdon Smith Anderson (upper left in glasses) is accompanied by other jury mem-
bers during a recess in the trial yesterday. The jury convicted seven, acquitted eight and a mistrial
was declared On three of 18 defendants.
FEDERAL SPENDING:
Senate, House CoTflict Seen
-. ).d 1 !

By The Associated Press
PASADENA, Calif. - Mariner 5;
chattered away flawlessly yester-
day, relaying scientific observa-'
tions it stored on tape during an
historic two-hour sweep past
Venus Thursday.
Distortion of radio signals by
Venus' atmosphere as the craft
looped behind the planet has told
scientists the atmosphere is very
dense-confirming a finding of
the Soviet Venus 4, which para-
chuted an instrumented capsule
into the carbon dioxide clouds
Wednesday.
WASHINGTON-Rep. John S.
Monagan (D-Conn.) said yester-
day that Gov. Ronald Reagan of
California is subject to criminal
prosecution for releasing a tele-
gram from the White House to
Price Dainiel, the administration's
liaison man with the governors'
conference.
Monagan told the House that
Reagan's action falls within a,
provision of the U.S. Code which
"sets forth criminal penalties for
the unauthorized divulgence of a
telegraph message by a person
who is not the agent of the
sender."
The telegram was from White
House aide Marvin Watson. It
told Daniel to question two Re-
publican governors, James A.
Rhodes of Ohio and John H.
Chafee of Rhode Island - about

their
Vietn
PI
striki
terda
whet
work
An a
day.
Th
a te
four-
Th
eight
have
mon
woul
to tI
VA
can's
appe
bish
easin
on
non-
Au
year
can's
decl
lits t
Mal
all n
Cath
He
shou
pens
regu
ding
Cath
ness

of Viet Policy
have created problems during! Gov. Calvin L. Rampton for-
war in American history. mally proposed the Vietnam war
ien the crucial vote came, resolution. It sought a conference
James A. Rhodes of Ohio declaration of wartime unity
the only Republican siding "above partisanship and beyond
25 Democrats to have the any question of approval or dis-
rence consider the resolu- approval of the strategic and tac-
Adoption would have requir- tical decisions which are not our
* votes-two thirds. Eighteen responsibility."
blicans voted against a rule Right to Dissent
nsion to permit action. "We as governors are supposed-
it was, the measure voted on ly leaders of public opinion in our
a toned-down version of a states," Rampton said. "We each
ution Republicans had vowed have the right to dissent." But he
sist. The new version elimi- said the governors had an obli-
I direct reference to Presi- gation to speak out on the war
Johnson's Vietnam policy, issue.
--_ _That brought California's Ron-
ald Reagan to his microphone
R ou -i with a caustic comment that
Ron ndup abr=
P proved, to be a crucial tactical
P__ _error.
"This is just one more step in
views on President Johnson's what has been recognized by some
am war policy. of us, and what we believe to be
* * the introduction of partisan poli-
TTSBURGH-Leaders of the tics intp the governors confer-
ing steel haulers decided yes- ence," Reagan said.
y to let the drivers vote on Connally promptly demanded
her they want to go back to and got the right to reply to Rea-
under compromise proposals. gan. "I consider it a personal
answer is expected by Mon- affront for you to say that I'm
acting for partisan political pur-
.e decision was announced in poses," the Texan said.
rse statement following a He said a statement of affirma-
hour meeting in Cleveland. tion by the governors was vital
e 16 representatives from the "in this time of confusion" and
states where steel haulers division. "There is no intent on
been striking for two my part to inject politics," Con-
ths wouldn't say whether they nally said.
d recommend the compromise As the votes were cast, Mich-
he strikers. igan Gov. George Romney, voting
* * *against consideration, said once
LTICAN CITY - The Vati- again that the conference was no
stop. Christian unity expert place for foreign policy decisions,
paled at the Roman Catholic "Past resolutions have been mis-
ops synod yesterday for an used," he said. "They have added
ig of the Church's regulations to the confusion, not alleviated
marriages of Catholics to it."
Catholics.. Key Passage
igustin Cardinal Bea, the 86- The key passage in the original
-old president of the Vati- resolution proposes that the con-
s Christian Unity Secretariat, ference "reaffirm to the Presi-
ared 'the Church should drop dent, to the American public, to
traditional demand for for- the servicemen and women of the
promises that the children of military forces of the United
nixed marriages be reared as States and its allies its resolute
iolics. support of our commitments and
e also said local pastors responsibilities in the world, in-
ild be given permission to dis- cluding our support of the mili-
e with in certain cases the tary defense of Vietnam against
lation that for validity a wed- aggression and our continuing
must be performed by a search for a meaningful solution
olic priest before two wit- assuring peace and stability in
es. that area."

uver nua
WASHINGTON EPs-The Senatei
Appropriations Committee rejected
yesterday a House move to force
President Johnson to chop $6 bil-]
lion to $8 billion from the national1
budget-thus setting up an intra-
Capitol struggle over federal,
spending.
By a 16-4 vote, the committeeE
approved a resolution simply ex-I
tending to Nov. 15 the temporary
authority of federal agencies to
continue spending at last year's
rate. The Senate is expected to,
take up the measure Tuesday.
The House on Wednesday voted1
such an extension until Nov. 23 but
attached a directive to Johnson to
rework his fiscal 1968 budget on,
virtually everything except mili-
tary spending to the levels of fiscalj
1967-and to cut federal employ-9
ment by more than 100,000.
Budget Director Charles L.
Schultze told the Senate panel this
approach would force cuts of $6+
billion to $8 billion and called the
plan unworkable.
About half the government de-
partments and major independent
agencies are operating now under

u u trrop satsBy an 18-11 vote it approved an
etamendment by Rep. Edith Green
(D-Ore, that would make state or
temporary spending authority have been enacted only for the local governments the official
voted earlier. This authority ex- Treasury, Post Office, Interior and agencies for distributing anti-
pires automatically at midnight Defense departments and for con- poverty funds.
Monday and after these agencies gressional expenses. The amendment would provide
theoretically would be without At the heart of the prolonged that where the state or local gov-
money and unable to function. tussle between Congress-partic- ernment fails to establish a coi-
However, as they have had to do ularly the House-and the Pres- munity-action agency, a project
in the past, the offices are expect- ident is Johnson's insistence that can be funded directly by the
ed to keep on operating, at least a 10 per cent income tax sur- OEO.
for a few days, while House and charge must be voted to help meet In an equally sensitive area-
Senate conferees seek agreement Vietnam costs and stem inflation, the participation in voter-registra-
on a stopgap resolution. House leaders, including some tion drives by antipoverty work-
But Senate leaders would not powerful ones in his own party, ers-Mrs. Green won approval of
hazard any guesses on what would have refused to take up any tax an amendment designed to prevent
happen if the conference commit- increase proposal until spending is the use of funds, personnel or
tee finds itself in a prolonged cut sharply. programs for such purposes.
stalemate.
Southern, conservative Dem-
ocrats teamed with House Repub- TONIGHT at
licans in Wednesday's 238-164 vote
to force the budget-cutting task
into the President's hands. k
But in the Senate committee 1421 HILL STREET
test even some of the Republicans14 :31LS.E
turned from this approach in favor 8:30 P.M.
of the administration's contention DAVE SIG L I N and SH ELLY POSE N
that Congress should pass all ap-
propriations bills, cutting them as (of Toronto, Canada)
it sees fit, with Johnson doing SINGING CITY FOLK MUSIC
further trimming when he knows ployng 6- and 12-string guitar and banjo
what he has to work with. S1.00 Cover includes entertainment and refreshments
So far, new appropriations bills ;_____________________________________

- - - - - - - a a a S S S - - -
w w w w w - - - U

1-
ODET
I I
TONIGHT ONLY
door opens at 8:00 P.M. goodies as usual $2.00 per person
330 Maynard
I --next week: JONI MITCHELL

I

IF You can't go to Washington Saturday
IF You feel the war should be stopped
IF You care
Send a telegram or letter to the
President of the United States, White
House, Washington, D.C., Saturday,
October 21,1 asking him to
STOP THE WAR!
A fifteen-word telegram to Washington is only $1.50
For further information call Ric Goodspeed or
David Heller, 761-6356

SOLD OUT!

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