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October 21, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-21

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. OCTORFR 91 1491

PAGE TWO THE MItflIV~AN DAILY

S~t TTT7AV ACJl ii 1 .-l-. L1- l4 1 ~''* ~ WM, JUj

QUESTION OF ECONOMICS:
Farmer Hits Ghetto Conditions

Cutler Tells Student Advisers,
Rule-Making Authority in Flux

JNA. ~TEN~RAt C "~P
I 'I

5th AND
FINAL WEEK

FX ASt~Th T 41F,:$ S
OK VILL8G3E
'r No. MAPLE RD,.-769.130"

Feature Times
Monday - Friday
8:30 p.m. only-
Saturday - Sunday
2- 5:10 -8:30 n.m.

141

By MARGARET WARNER
"For every ten Negroes that walk
into the front door of American
business and industry, one hun-
dred are thrown out of the back
door through automation," former
CORE director James Farmer said
to a meeting of the Youth Council
of NAACP at Tappan Junior High
last. night.
Farmer, speaking as a substitute
for. Father James Groppi of the
Milwaukee Youth Council who
could not attend because of legal
entanglements, said that he could
not deprecate the victories of the
civil rights movement. "But," he
said, "those victories have been
largely in the South, and largely
for the middle class."
Farmer compared American
ghetto communities to exploited
colonies, providing cheap labor
and "being forced to buy high-
priced goods from white industries.
He noted that the Negro labor pool
earns $29 billion per year, but that
only 2 per cent of that remains
in the ghetto.
"If Harold Wilson had that kind
of balance of payments problem,
he'd have a hemmorage," Farmer
quipped .
He emphasized that the ghetto
must undergo economic develop-
ment similar to an underdeveloped
nation. He said that economic ex-
perts experienced in such countries
are now analyzing ghetto prob-
lems, hoping to develop income-
producing potential within ghettos.I
Farmer suggested that U.S. in-
dustry could invest much of the

By JILL CRABTREE 1
"The whole area of rule-mak-
ing and decision-making is in
flux. It is the job of the Presi-
dential Commission on Decision-
making to sort it out," said
Richard Cutler, vice president for
student affairs Thursday at a
meeting of his Student Advisory
Board.
Cutler was explaining planned
administration action regarding
Joint Judiciary Council's stated
policy of enforcing only those
non-academic regulations which
have been made or approved by
students.
Besides rule enforcement, the
Student Advisory Board discussed
Residential College autonomy and
the relationship of the University
to the city.
No Action
John Bishop, Grad, chairman
of the Student Advisory Board,
said after the meeting that he
did not think the administration
would take any decisive action in
the area of rule enforcement un-
til after the Decision-making
Commission has reported.
The students urged administra-
tion acceptance of a request from
the Residential College that their
community government, which
includes students, be given the
autonomy to decide on conduct!
rules for the college.
Board members said that such
an arrangement would be neces-
sary to maintain a "feeling of
communication" between resident
fellows, professors and students!
in the college.
The discussion of University-
city relations centered around ex-
THURSDAY
October 26th

ploitation of the student market
by local merchants and police on
campus.
The Board urged University
support of students in their in-
teractions with local merchants.
Policemen
The Board also urged that the
University u s e "behind - the -
scenes pressure" to limit what
policemen are allowed to do on
campus. Cutler replied to their
suggestion with a three-part
statement:
-Police have a right to come
on campus, because the Univer-
sity is under their jurisdiction and
"the University is not a sanc-
tuary."
-The relationship the Univer-
sity has with the Ann Arbor po-
lice is based on effective under-

standing between University and
city officials.
-In practice the police do not
come on campus except when the
University feels there is a "clear
and present danger" to persons
or property.
CORRECTION
Contrary to a story which
appeared in yesterday's Daily,
the faculty of the psychology
department has not yet voted
to eliminate graduate language
requirements. A mail poll of
faculty opinion has been taken,
but the matter will not be con-
sidered formally until the Nov.
6 meeting of the department's
Executive Committee.

1

COLMBA PICTURES ,..
JUMAM HUTTON ' OOTHY PENMITON BERE
JOEYBISHOP'BOBDENVO and
NLTRBRENNA

--Daily-Jay Cassidy
ODETTA AT CANTERBURY
Odetta, deep-voiced folk singer, delivers one of her rich renditions
of an African song before an overflow audience at Canterbury
House last night. She will also perform tonight before those who
can't get tickets to see the Ramsey Lewis trio and Buffy St. Marie.

"'TO SIR, WITH LOVE' IS ENTERTAINMENT
OF THE WARMEST SORT, SO RIGHT THAT
YOU WOULD STAND UP AND CHEER!"
-Archer Winsten, New York Post

$30-40 billion held in pension
funds into ghetto business and in-
dustrial development.
He contended that this would be
particuarly feasible if the govern-
ment were to give such businesses
a tax advantage, guarantee high-
risk loans, and guarantee initial
profits, much as it does when it1
aids underdeveloped nations.
In response to a question about
the violence in the 1967 Detroit
riot, Farmer said that he didn't
believe that the ends justify the
means. "But," he quickly added,
"I don't condemn a person for
striking out when he's hurt."
Farmer expressed fear of poten-
tial violence in the coming sum-
mers as Black Power groups gain
in "sophistication of technology."
America should be particularly
concerned, he said, about what will
happen when Negro youths return

from Vietnam trained in guerilla
warfare and have to face the "old
frustrations of the ghetto."
He said that he did not agree
with those who say that whites
have no place in ghetto work. He.
cited the work of Father Groppi in
organizing the Milwaukee Youth
Council as proof that there is a
need for whites who want to join
in the movement for Negro rights.
But, he said, it is infinitely more
difficult for a white to be acceptedE
in a ghetto situation than it is for!
a Negro.
'Farmer helped found the Con-
gress of Racial Equality with a
group of students at the University
of Chicago in 1942. He was thef
first national, chairman of CORE
and became its national director
in 1961. He is presently working on,
a state literacy campaign in New
Jersey.

SCOLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
SIDNEY
pOITIER
In JAMES CLAVELL'S
PRODUCTION OF
"To
WITH
LOVE"

"A colorful, kicky
movie in the
mod mood!"
-Good Housekeeping Magazine
"PICTURE OF
THE MONTH!"
-Seventeen Magazine
"Sidney Poitier
M ~just' perfect
... this film
wili enthrall you!'
-Cosmopolitan Magazine
JVYGEESON - CHIRISTIAN ROBERTS Intrducing
SOY ENDA11 -THE "MINDBENDERS" "LULU"
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9:07
DIAL 5-6290

VICTOlR BUONO'JAKGLOR
WrittenbyR.S.ALLEN and HARVEYBULLOCK-"MusicbyLALO SCHIFAIN
Produced by NORMAN MAURER - Directed by HOWARD MORRIS
A N=RMAN MAURER PRDUCTIONM. EASTMAN COLOR

SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES
SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES
MATINEES 1:15-4:50
EVEN INGS 8:30
NO SEATS RESERVED
Every Ticket Holder Guaranteed A Seat

1:15 - 3:s5
5:15 - 7:20
9:25

DIAL NO 2-626 1
. SUN DAY
Matinee Only,
are NOT
(' k Continuous

i

i

DIRECTOR'S
FESTIVAL

49LTW

Dial
8-6416

...I

JAMES)FARMER
-Jim
TONIGHT & SUNDAY
Grapes of
Wrath
dir. John Ford, 1941
From Seinbeck's classic
comes this Academy
Award Winner, starring
Henry Fonda,
Jane Darwelf.
"The picture faithfully.
transmitted the shocking
and desperate plight of
California's migatory
workers."
-Arthur Knight
7:00 and 9:05
.ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
STILL ONLY 50cm
Phone 434-0190
Enrawn" cam. CARPENTER ROAN

FRI.-SAT.-OCT. 20-21
TRUFFAUT'S and jiM
STARRING JEANNE MOREAU AND OSKAR WERNER
Although Truffaut evokes the romantic nostalgia before
World War 1, he exquisitely Illuminates a modern woman.
" This film established him as the leader of the New Wave.

A

4.. ".
'.; .
u. ?:d
i r;:
.1ti
. ": .

SUN.-MON.-OCT. 22-23
MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI'S
This story of Italy's idle rich established Antonioni as one
of the leading directors in the world end Is a provocative
statement about modern society. All-Time Film Great.

' THE
SAND
A R80819WISE PRODUCI
...SIEVE MCQUEEN
RICHARD ATTENIOROHI1
RICHARD CRENNA
CANDICE DERIEMwR iTANDRIANE
ROBERT WISE'" ROBERT ANDERSON " RICHARD McKENNA
BORIS I.E EN'JERRf C(N.CSMIIN
ui ABotsolo 501* ~mPvu " im aP5101. IoWSMMAS
CO c LOYt

ii i I

TUES.-WED.-OCT. 24-25
TH LAPHIHCOCK'S
constantly flashing from melodrama to comedy, the film
thrills the viewer and teases him to outguess the master
" of intrigue. With Michael Redgrave & Dame May Whitty.

THURSDAY at the
STATE Theatre

I

5 ACADEM)
"BEST FOREIGN
"BEST DIRECTOR
"BEST ORIGINAL
"BEST ART DIRECTII
WINNER N.Y.FILM
"BEST FOREIGN LANGU
"BEST FILM OF THE)
-David Slavitt, Newsweek Masa
-John Vorhees, Seattle Post tnte
- Philip T. Hartun, Commonwea
-Thomas Quinn Curtiss, Paris Ee

Vthi FORUM
Proudly Presents a
FELLINI FILM FESTIVAL
NOW SHOWING
V AWARD NOMINATIONS! Tree stories of the sexes..somewhat different,
LANGUAGE FILM OF THE YEAR!" somewhat daring, somewhat delicious.
JOSEPH E.LEVINE
STORY AND SCREENPLAY A: A^
WRITTEN DIRECTLY FOR THE SCREEN"
DN!" Mw, "BEST COSTUME DESIGN!" nsa(
CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD!
PAGE FILM OF THE YEAR!
YEAR!"
rE Produced by
An Embassy Pictures Release

i

I

Joeeph ER Levine peem
FEDERICO FELLINI'S
MARCELLO MASTROIANNI-CLAUDIA CARDINALEANOUK AIMEESANDRA MILO
ROSSELA FALK'BARBARA STEElE " mu .,.
Show times
Friday, October 20-7 and 9:30 p.m.
Monday, October 23-7 and 9:30 p.m.

"ilt has
glamour,
sophistication,
color, wit
and
sensuality 1".
.*8ostey Crowther,
New York Times

The RAFF"
starring
the Academy
Award Winner
tOREN
Directed by
VITTORIO
DeSICA

"COMPOSED OF MANY BRILLIANT SCENES,
A POWERFUL CLIMAX! MISS MASINA GIVES
A PERFORMANCE RARELY APPROACHED

"Boudoirabl I
Loren, Schneider
and Sexberg
made you
wish
you had
tix eyes 1"
..Walter Winchell

"TheTEMPTATION
olk.ANTON I0"
starring
ANITA
EKBERG
Directed by
FEDERICO
FELLINI
PEPPINO
De FILIPPO

ON THE SC
-N. Y. Herald Tri

.REEv it

BY A STRIKING AND ORIGINAL TRAGI-COMEDY
STUDS TERKEL

GILU
MA
in FED
F EL L IN

ibune
JLIETTA
SINA
)ERICO
II'S
A

**Seoeeo@.~@,,,,o,***o

''Sex 'Goddesses
Sophia Lored,
Anita Ekberg and
Romy Schneider
give highly
erotitillating
performances."
-Time Magazine

"The JOB*
starring
ROMy
SCHNEIDER
Directed by
LUCIJINO
VISCONTIM A1
MIAN, VALLI

For persons over 18 years of age

!. 4.i..... 6..u.... d 6_ _....

ift-

L

11

AA Embassy pdm Ia 'U

'

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