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October 13, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-13

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1867

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I~'RTDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1967 TIlE MICHIGt~ lI~1IIX

AL n%

Thieu Offers

To

Talk

PART-TIME:
USSR To Draft

~To

North

V6-Year-Olds
SMOSCOW () Accusing the increases in S o v i e

Will Propose
Halt in Raids
Over North
South Prefers Talks
With Ho, But Willing
To Meet at Any Level
S A I G 0O N () President-elect
Ngyuen Van Thieu will send a
letter to North Vietnamese Pre-
sident Ho, Chi Minh proposing
that they meet to talk peace, a
spokesman for Thieu said today.
Thieu's letter will offer a one-
week pause in the bombing of
North Vietnam if Hanoi shows
some willingness to talk about
peace, the spokesman said.
"Thieu would only- meet with
Ho Chi Minh," the spokesman
continued, "but he will not meet
with any lesser official. If the
North Vietnamese propose a
meeting at a lower level, we will
send a lower-level official of our
own. We will meet'at any level."
The letter will be sent through
diplomatic channels shortly after
Thieu is inaugurated Oct. 30, the
spokesman said.
The spokesman said even if Ha-
noi did not agree to a meeting,
the bombing pause would go into
effect if the North Vietnamese
"show their good will by stopping
the infiltration of the South or
stop making trouble in the
South."
Demands Meeting
Thieu announced in August
during the presidential campaign
that he would offer a bombing
pause if Hanoi showed some in-
dication of willingness to meet
with representatives of his gov-
ernment. He later said he would
make the offer a week or 10 days
after his inauguration.
This is the first time the gov-
ernment has announced that a
letter actually will be sent to Ho
Chi Minh offering the bombing
pause. The letter could go through
a third country or be delivered
by a member of the International
Control Commission, whose In-
dian, Polish and Canadian staff
members are in both North and
South Vietnam, theoretically to
control observance of the 1954
Geneva agreements.
U.S. Unaware
The spokesman also indicated
that the letter might be delivered
via the press by releasing it to
ews media for Hanoi to learn of
t that way. But it more probably
will go by diplomatic channels,
he said.
U.S. officials were unaware of
Thieu's plans to write to Ho and
it is known that many of them,
especially on the military side,
are not too happy about the pos-
sibility of a bombing pause. Ha-
noi took advantage of pauses in
the past to increase movement of
men and supplies south, they say.
They also feel a pause might be
taken as an indication of allied
weakness.
However, most observers think
that Hanoi will reject Saigon's
offer of a bombing pause since the
North Vietnamese seem convinced
that political events in the United
States, and especially the 1968
presidential election, will have a
greater effect on American parti-
cipation in the war than events
in Vietnam.

AT PRESS.-CONFERENCE:
Rusk Denounces War Critics,
I Defends U.S. Peace Attempts

United States of inpreasing mili-
tary preparations, Soviet Defense
Minister Andrei A. Grechko an-
nounced yesterday a program of
part-time military training for all
Soviet boys beginning at the age
of 16.
Marshal Grechko also announ-
ced that the age for calling
youths to their required full-time
military service was being reduc-
ed from 19 to 18 years and the
period of active service reduced

from 3 to 2 years for ordinary
WASHINGTON (A) - Aban- an administration campaign. Be-{Vietnamese "live there comfort- troops.
doning his usual calm, Secretary sides, the State Department's ably" for 40 or 50 years and con- Addressing the Supreme Soviet,
of State Dean Rusk turned vigor- head was reported personally fed tinued: Addressinthcupremei
ously yesterday on critics of the up with much of the antiwar talk "Where would be the incentive ecteparliament whic uto eat-cal
administration's Vietnam policy on Capitol Hill. for peace? . . . Now let's not be a new military service bill intro-
-particularly Sen. J. W. Ful- "I have great respect for intel- children!" new m y rc e bilnso
bright (D-Ark.). lectuals, but I don't feel that I'm Rusk, however, saw no problem ducminister byaccusedhko, the United
Fulbright told the Senate Wed- intimidated by them," Rusk, a with the proposal by the new States of imperialism in Vietnam
nesday that the United Nations one time professor, said when a So u t h Vietnamese president, and the Middle East
at present "is deterred from ac- reporter asked about "intellec- Nguyen Van Thieu, for a week's
tion by the opposition of the So- tual critics of the war" including bombing pause to get Hanoi into I the present situation, Grech-
viet Union but even more, I think former administration aides Ar- negotiations. ko said, the Soviet Union is tak-
by the failure of the principal bel- thur Schlesinger, Jr., and Roger He said that the reported Thieu ng all steps necessary to streng-
ligerent, the United States, to en- Hilsman. plan poses "no problem to Wash- then its defenses.
courage it to act." Rusk said he didn't understand ington . . . What is needed is a He warned the deputies that if
Rusk, asked at a news confer- how senators could accept the response from Hanoi . . . There's a general war developed, "it will
ence about the statement, re- declarations of the 1964 resolution no problem between ourselves and involve not only armies but the
plied: "I would say it is not true." on Southeast Asia-which approv- South Vietnam on that." populations of the fighting pow-
Rusk said the Communists are ed of using armed force as neces- "Hanoi knows w h a t this ers." So, Grechko said, every citi-
barring a U.N. role and that Ha- sary-and then "brush them aside means," Rusk told the newsmen. zen has an obligation to be trai-
not is not interested in negotia- as having no validity." "We've had not the slightest in- ed for defense.
ting. Nonetheless Ruskin nono Fulbright is one who voted for dication from Hanoi that they are The new program for 16- and
ced himself "encouraged by pro- the resolution and later expressed interested in productive discus- 17-year-olds will educate Soviet
gress toward peace in South Viet- regret about it and the course sions." youth in discipline and create
nam" through military opera- Johnson has followed. On the Middle East question, conditions for the fastest train-
tion, pacification and internal "If people change their minds," Rusk urged the nations involved ing of 18-year-old recruits in mo-
political advances. Rusk said, biting his words for to work urgently toward solving dern military techniques, Grech-
The secretary of state fired his sharp emphasis, "it's fair to ask their problems because, he said. ko added.
defensive valleys in an unusually on which accasion were they "time is not working for a peace- In recent years, he went on, So-
dfnievlesianuuulyright."i ful settlement." viet armed forces' have been
long newsrconference-nearly an Told of Rusk's comments, Ful- u Secret diplomatic talks at the equipped with the most modern
hour - repeatedly denouncing bright said he had stated many United Nations and elsewhere have type of weapons, made possible
North Vietnam for what he called times that he was mistaken when not produced a settlement formula, by the industrial growth of this
peace proposals from the United he first supported U.S. Vietnam he conceded, but said "progress is country.
States and other countries. policy and added, "I believe I am possible." The marshal boasted of great
right now." _.._ -- - --
Combined with House Speaker Rusk was asked why the Uni-
John McCormack's recent de- ted States did not stop the bomb-
nunciation of congressional criti- ing of North Vietnam in a new j
cism of President Johnson's Viet- effort to get Hanoi into peace H E LD O V E R !
nam course, Rusk's meeting with talks. Rusk asked whether the
newsmen appeared to be part of proposal was to let the North;
WitnessCINEMA II
Witness Acknowledges Plot;
PRESENTS
Klan Marked' Schwerner JASON ROBARDS JR
MERIDIAN, Miss. () - A Ku Klan Meridian unit, and were
Klux Klan "titan" told a federal told that a top-level decision to i
court jury yesterday that the eliminate "Goatee," as Schwerner
Klan set out to "eliminate" civil was known, had been made-but
rights worker Michael Schwerner that another unit would handle
by murder. the job.
The Rev. Delmar Dennis of Unlike Miller, who said he hadCo
Meridian, was the second witness been banished from the Klan, the
to take the stand in the crowded Rev. Mr. Dennis testified he re-
courtroom to testify that Schwer- mained a member of the terrorist
ner had been a marked man for organization.
several days before he was killed. At a meeting on June 28, a SHORT: CHAPTER 3, FLASH GOR DON
Schwerner, 24, a Brooklyn so- week after the workers were slain,
cial worker before coming to Me- Miller said a Klan member told
ridian, was killed June 21, 1964. him the trio had been shot and
Two men who accompanied him had been buried in an earthen FRI DAY SATU R DAY
on his last trip-Andrew Good- dTm
man, 20, of New York, and James dm
Chaney, 22, of Meridian -also George Burley, an FBI ballis-
C an . 22, of Meridian - alsotics expert, testified that the AUDITORIUM A 7 and 9:15P.M.
The 18 men n trial are charg- rights workers were shot fromA IMn5
ed with conspiracy to violate the close range - an inch or closer A NGEL L HALL 50c
civil rights of the three who were - with .38-caliber pistols. Four
slain, the stiffest federal charge ofthe febulletswre from the
applicable in the case,. same weapon, he said. ________________________________

rri

l
h

Maximum punishment possible
under the old Reconstruction era
law is 10 years and $5,000 fine. .
The Rev. Mr. Dennis, who
said he preached in both Baptist
and Methodist churches in this
area, came under sharp cross-
examination after his testimony,
most of which corroborated ear-
lier testimony by Meridian Police
Sgt. C. W. Miller, 43, an ex-
Klansman.
Both Miller and the minister
said they were members of the
White Knights of the Ku Klux

"INSPIRATION ... BRILLIANCE!"-Detroit Free Press
"ELOQUENT & ELEGANT ... MAGNIFICANCE!"-Detroit News

"SUPERB!"-Michigan Daily

"POWERFUL!"-Ann Arbor News

TONIGHT and SATURDAY at
_HE ARK
----1421 HILL STREET
8:30
BOB WHITE-(from San Diego, California) returns-singing bal-
lads, children's songs, and folk music, playing guitar, banjo,
and AUTOHARP. (Bob did the Woody Guthrie Folk-in with Will
Geer and will do one set in memory of Woody Guthrie)
$1.00 Cover includes entertainment and refreshments

I

WT IIPta( iO USB
the 3rd annual
HUMPHREY BOGART

film festival:

TONIGHT-THE BIG SLEEP
tnrize given to thoe pwho carncn lt-the. dced)

__ - il UE1"A Li D I if _t0U

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