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October 13, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-13

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ER AY. OCTOBER 13. 1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN flATLY FRfl~IAV flCTflflF~R. 12 1QE~7

1 l iL[1i, VV 1Vl7iil I'll laui

f

Romney Kelley, Ask Highway Investigation

LANSING (4) - Gov. George
Romney and Atty. Gen. Frank
Kelley said yesterday they will
file a joint petition requesting
a grand jury investigation of al-
leged wrongdoing in the State
Highway Department.
"The petition will be based on
new evidence uncovered by the
attorney general since the issu-
ance of his public report, as well
as information set forth in that
report," said a Kelley-Romney
statement.
The. governor and the attorney
general said there would be no
further comment on the petition
from either office.
Romney, Kelley Clash
The decision to petition for a
grand jury grew out of a State
Highway Commission request
that such a grand jury look into
department activities from' 1957
through 1964.
Romney and Kelley clashed ov-
er the request.
Romney supported an investi-
gation, while Kelley maintained
that facts included in a report of
an investigation conducted by his
office failed to warrant a grand
jury.
Kelley said earlier this month
that he has been continuing his
investigation, but he refused to
elaborate.
"Nothing in the investigationa
indicates incompetence on the
part of the present administra-
tion," Romney said in a news
conference earlier today.
Romney said, however, "I don't
believe there should be any limits
on an investigation."{
Kelley's 90-page report on his,
office's investigation, issued July
24, listed several payments to
highway contractors in excess of
the contract price which Kelley
said were made contrary to law.
Preferential Treatment
It charged some contractors re-
ceived favorable treatment from
the department, but it concluded]
that no Highway Department of-
ficials could be shown to have1
committed illegal acts.
Romney had said a grand jury
should conduct a "stem to stern"
investigation of former Highway
Department officials, checking in-
to their "political slush funds to
determine whether any money,

came from highway or contractor' Romney and Kelley had agreed

sources."
John C. Mackie, elected high-
way commissioner in 1957, re-
elected in 1961 and elected to
Congress in 1964, threatened

Tuesday to sue
"public utterances
integrity."
In a letter to
Mackie said, "I
statements to be
malicious, and a

Romney over
concerning my
the governor,
consider your
irresponsible,
deliberate at-

last Thursday to end their differ-
ences over the proposed grand
jury. "Whatever action is taken
will seek not only to determine if
there are any who are guilty of
crimes, but will also seek to clear
those who are innocent of wrong-
doing," they said last week.
That joint statement followed
political sniping over the investi-
gation.
Romney had accused Kelley of
"sitting on his hands" when ask-
ed to investigate the department.
The governor said he repeated-
ly had asked for probes of the
department since 1963.

Kelley charged that Romney's
support for a grand jury investi-
gation was motivated by personal,
political considerations arising out
of an attack by a newspaper on
Romney's "presidential ambi-
tions."
The controversy grew out of
the Highway Commission's re-
quest that Romney take steps to
cause a grand jury investigation
of the department.
The commission also asked
Romney to support its efforts to
clarify allegations of wrongdoing
and that they occurred before the
present commissioners took of-
fice in 1965.

Unitaian Curch.1917washtenaw
R , tA Ave., I inyCuc,11i Y v. n your old painting clothes Sun-
N IZATI day at 4:00 p.m. Hot dawg supper
{ at 6:30, followed by discussion, "The
CCChallenge for the Liberay Ministry"
with the Minister of Religious Edu-
Hillel, Kosher Ko-op will serve meals cation.
Friday, 5:15 p.m. at Hillel.
F* * Guild House, noon luncheon, Oct. 13,
Student Zionist Organization and 12-1:00, 802 Monroe., Mrs. Wyona How-
Hillel sponsor Orthodox High Holy Day ard. G.R.O.W.: "Community Organi-
Services and Conservative Services, zaing and the Riots," Friday eve,.din-
Orthodax - Oct. 13. Hillel, 1429 Hill,' ner (at cost) with program. Oct. 13,
Small Chapel - enter from rear, Kol 6 p.m., 802 Monroe.
Nidre - 6:15 p.m., Oct. 14. Sabath
Service - 8:30 am., Convervative. Members of the University Coin-
Rackham Lecture Hal, Oct. 13, Kol munity interested in Objectivism the
Nidre - 7:30 p.m., Oct. 14, 9:30 a.m. philosophy of Ayn Rand, who would
* * * like to form a discussion group please
Student Zionist Organization. Suk- call: Philip Coates, 763-1688 or Greg
kahi Raising. Oct. 15, Hillel, for thc Armtrong, 665-2866.I
time call 663-4129. * *
* * * UM Chess Club. Oct.t13. 7.

I a

E
a
i

*
"I

tempt to impugn my reputation."
Romney refused comment on
the letter.

La Sociedad Hispanica, unareunion,
Mon., Oct. 16. 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze:
coffee, conversation, Hispanic Music.
Vengan Todos!
Unitarian Universalist Student Re-
ligious Liberals: Work party at First

U V l U 5 IIU . . %U . , , r~ p.m .,
3C Union.
Baha'i Student Group, informal dis-
cussion: "Are You Searching More Now
and.Finding Less?", Friday, Oct. 13, 8
p.m..d520 Ashley.Call 662-3548 if you
need transporation.

Michigan Senate Votes Package HELD
For Raising Gas, Weight Taxes'A

LANSING (;P)-The state Senate
today passed and sent to the house
a five-bill package designed to
raise some $60 million in highway
funds by raising the state gasoline
and motor vehicle weight taxes.
The bills passed with votes to
spare despite bipartisan opposition
urging the Senate to wait until a
proposed grand jury investigation
of the highway department is
completed.
Other senators objected on the
grounds that the public should not
be subjected to another tax in
addition to a new state income tax
passed earlier this year.
The package raises the state
gasoline tax from the present six1
cents per gallon to seven cents andI
sets aside $3.5 million annually to]
pay off Mackinac Bridge bonds.
The package also calls for a
lowering of bridge tolls from the
present $3.75 for passenger cars to
$1.50. However, the $1.50 tolls
would be continued until the state
is repaid for the money spent in
paying off the bridge bonds.
The measures also shift distribu-
tion of motor highway funds, tak-
ing 1 per cent each away from the
state and counties and adding
2 per cent to the share of the
cities and villages.
Similar bills were passed by the
Senate during the regular session,I
but the Senators refused to ap-

prove a House amendment which voting an increase in highway
would have allocated $6 million funds when a grand jury probe
annually for repayment of Mack- threatened to uncover thievery in
inac Bridge bonds. the State Highway Department.
Democratic Sen. Garland Lane Joining Lane in the objection
of Flint voted "no" on all five of were Republicans Gilbert Bursley
the bills, saying the Senate was of Ann Arbor and Robert Huber ofj
leaving itself open to ridicule by Birmingham.
Roekettes Return to Stage;
Show Moves to Music Hall

NOW SHOWING
"AN EXTREMELY EROTIC MOVIE!"
- Playboy Magazine
"EACH SCENE A WORK OF ART."
- Cue Magazine

#1

NEW YORK (,P) - The city's
most glamorous picket line dis-
persed yesterday and the Radio
City Rockettes and ballerinas pre-
pared to return to the great stage
of the Music Hall, after settlement
of their 2-day strike.
It was the first walkout in the
35-year history of the Music Hall,
which bills itself as "the nations
showplace." The stage show is
scheduled to resume today.
The strike settlement was at-
tributed to Theodore W. Kheel,
New York's best known labor me-
diator. His services -as a binding
arbitrator were pledged by state
mediators without his knowledge.
The 130 stage performers struck
Sept. 16. Since then, in weather
fair and foul, the girls walked'
picket lines outside the 6,200-seat
theater at 50th Street and Sixth
Avenue.
The shapely entertainers, some
in miniskirts and pony tail hair-
dos, proved a tourist attraction in
their own right outside the theater,
and delighted native girl watchers.
In place of the regular stage

show, the Music Hall substituted a
32-minute musical program.
The box office fell off during
the strike, although the Music
Hall declined to give out attend-
ance figures. There was even talk
of abandoning the last of the na-
tion's full time theatrical stage
shows if the strike continued.
The girls were making from $99
to $125 a week when they struck
and demanded $140 to $180 a week.
Kheel eventually will fix the fig-
ure, but with the stipulation that
it cannot be below the theater's
last offer of a $99 a week minimum
and a $160 maximum in the third
year of the new contract.
The performers also will receive
$2.50 an hour for rehearsals that
can run to 14 hours a week. Pre-
viously they rehearsed without ex-
tra pay.
Vincent D. McDonnel state me-
diation board chairman an-
nounced the settlement shortly be-
fore dawn, after an 18-hour nego-
tiating session with union and
theater representatives and a few
of the girls.

~1
I'

MAt ZETTERLING'S
Starring
Night Games INGRID
THULIN
7:00, 9:15-Mon.-Thurs.
7:00,9:15, 11:30-Fri. &Sat.
6:00,18:15, 10:30-Sun.

I.a Jui
AlmOLLC O NN _________________G"Wibt uim ei ts a aa Nff'k
kARAMOIIT '
t PYCTUR4

Saudia Arabia Blasts Israel
As Cause of Arab Turmoil

1:00-3:00-5:00
7:15-9:20

Dial NO 2-6264
JJeATE

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (JP) -
In one of the toughest Arab
speeches of the current UN Gen-
eral Assembly session, Saudi Ara-
blia declared yesterday it would
never accept the existence of
Israel.
"It will continue to be alien
and unwanted until it disappears,"
Ibrahim Al-Sowayel, Saudi Ara-
bian ambassador to Washington,
told the assembly.
'Ersatz Israel'
"The existence of an ersatz
Israeli enclave in Palestine will
continuously be a cause of turmoil
and upheaval and will remain the
principal factor causing violence
in our area."
Al-Sowayel declared it was "the
first and basic duty" of the assem-
bly to "liquidate the conse-
quences" of the Arab-Israeli war
of last June, in which Israel
seized parts of Egypt, Syria and
Jordan.
'Eradicate Aggression'
"It is imperative," the Saudi
Arabian said, "that all the con-
sequences of the fifth of June
aggression be eradicated."
The only alternative, he said,
was "an explosion engulfing the
Arab world."
The Saudi Arabian position was
outlined as diplomats consulted
behind the scenes on the next
step in dealing with the Middle
East problem.
The general debate, the three-
week period during which mem-
ber nations make broad policy
statements, ends today. The as-!
sembly had been expected to be-
gin its debate Monday on the
Middle East question.
There were widespread indica-
TONIGHT
The Music Room
dir. Sotyajit Ray, 1958
The great Indian director
presents Chekhov's tale,
with music by Ravi
Shankar. From the
director of the
Apu Trilogy.

tions that the assembly debate
would be deferred while backstage
negotiations on possible Security
Council action continued. A deci-
sion was expected today.
The pressure for a delay report-
edly was coming from several
Arab nations. They are said to
prefer Security Council action,
since they are not represented
there and would not have to vote
on any settlement that might be
worked out.
Western nations also were re-
ported favoring a postponement
of assembly action. Some dele-
gates pointed out that final action
will have to be taken by the coun-
cil and it was best to wait for a
U.S.-Soviet accord on what ac-
tion the council should take.
Vietnam War
The war in Vietnam also con-
tinued to share the spotlight with
the Middle East in the assembly.
Ambassador H. S. Amersinghe
of Ceylon urged an unconditional
cessation of U.S. bombing of
North Vietnam as a step toward
peace. He declared that a lasting
settlement could only be worked
out between North Vietnam, the
Viet Cong and South Vietnam.
Foreign Minister David Charles
Ganao of Congo, Brazzaville, as-
sailed the U.S. role in Vietnam
as one of "the most barbarous
acts in the history of the world,
except for the follies of Nazism.

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THE. MRISH CORPORATION PRESENTS
JULIE ANDREWS MAX VON SYDOW-RICHARD HARRIS
iTHE GEORGE RO'YHILL WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION r"HAWAI'"ANAVIMI N'COLOR taie

"'TO SIR, WITH LOVE' IS A MOVIE THAT
REMINDS YOU OF WHAT REALLY WARM
GOOD MOVIES ARE LIKE. YOU CRY AND
YOU LAUGH BUT IT'S A BEAUTIFUL MOVIE
AND PERFECT FROM TOP TO BOTTOM!"
-Judith Crist, NBC TV
"SIDNEY POITIER IS SUPERB!" The young
players enact their roles with remarkable
reality! Purposeful and, at the same time,
warm, moving and humorous!"New York Daily News
"'TO SIR, WITH LOVE' IS ENTERTAINMENT
OF THE WARMEST SORT, SO RIGHT THAT
YOU WOULD STAND UP AND CHEER!"
-Archer Winsten, New York Post

16

"A colorful, kicky
movie in the
mod mood!"
Good Housekeeping Magazine
"PICTURE OF
THE MONTH!"
-Seventeen Magazine
"Sidney Poitier
just perfect
.this film
will enthrall you!"
Cosmopolitan Magazine

MCOLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
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