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October 10, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-10

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, O OBER 10, 1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY TuESDAY. OCTOBER 10. 10117

,.uvai ay /t.i Vim/ LV 1V JUV

Dallapiecola Stresses Sincerity

cinema
Rough Night in Jericho' Motif:

Across .
Campus

By DAVID SPURRE
"Every composer belongs to a
certain tradition that he will fol-
low. I follow the Italian tradition,
because of the landscape I see,
the food I eat, the air I breathe,"
said*,Italian composer Luigi Dalla
piccola in a Daily interview Oct. 6.
"Everything affects the artist -
a sunny country, wars, peace, per-
secution-everything can nourish
him."
Dallapiccola, a small man with
a long face and a bushy mane that
makes him look a little like Beet-
hoven, paced up and down the
room. When asked whether mod-
ern art and music are better than
that of the classic period, he threw
up his hands. "Art! What is better
art? No one cay say-it is tliere,
timeless. Progress only applies to
technical things."
As advice to the young artist,
Dallapiccola used the words of the
ancient Sphinx: "'You have to be
yourself.' "'

"Musical styles often last for
only a season, like women's fash-
ions" he said in a thick Italian
accent. One must read in his own
soul what he will write to sincerely
express himself. One never creates'
for 'success,' and only a small part
of what is created can become im-
mortal."
Dallapiccola is an old man, now
retired from teaching, but not
from composing. "I shall die with
my pen in my hand," he said. Re-
flecting on his career, he feels in-
debted to "some good perform-
ances" of his works, by orchestras
under the great modern European
conductors.
Explaining his relationship as a
composer with the conductor, Dal-
lapiccola said, "My compositions
are very exactly written. The con-
ductor must really study my score,
then invent his own interpreta-
tion." In the past, Dallapiccola has
agreed wtih two different inter-
pretations of his composition, be-

Piaget Recounts Week at 'U,'
EXplains Theory of Mlemory

cause "both were convincing." In
writing for orchestra, he stresses
small ensembles or solos, for whatt
he calls "transparency of sound."z
"Proust said, 'Art is a product of
pain,' but Gide said that when he#
created, it was always joyful. It isE
impossible to have rules concern-
ing this-each man finds his own
way," explained Dallapiccolo. '
What he does feel is universal
to all composers, however, is at
sense of intuition-the idea that
unwritten music is confined inside
the composer which he must write.
"Inspiration is a term used byt
would-be composers," he said.
"The process of artistic creation isz
like 'how life begins.' It is not a
process of personal will but is con-
fused in our minds with everythingt
else."
In his Voices of Civilization lec-
ture Oct. 4, Dallapiccola used an
idea of Frederick Nietzsche's to
describe the artist's relation to his
work: "If one looks long enough
into an abyss, one suddenly finds1
that the abyss is looking back atI
him."
The lecture, titled "The Birtht
of a Libretto," was mostly about
his new opera "Ulysses." He hast
written two others, "Night Flight"c
and "The Prisoner."t
"The texts are confined in us,"
he said then. When "The Prisoner"'
was first performed several yearsZ
ago in Milan, a speech before the
performance said that "librettos
have always existed within himE
(Dallapiccola) ."
The composer told of an in-
spirational event in his life, in
1912, when as a boy he saw a silent
film, version of Homer's "Odys-
sey." During, the film, shades ofE
yellow, soft green and dark bluen
light were flashed on the screen.1
"Images were rising from the
depths of my subconscious," Dal-
lapiccola said.
"Take careful notice of every-
thing around you." Dallapiccola
has said. "I use any method to ex-
press myself;" the important thing j
is acquiring the artist's "sensibili-V
ty."

In his yet unfinished opera
"Ulysses," Dallapiccola reduces
the mythical hero into a modern
man. "Ulysses is transformed into
a man of our time," he says, "a
torn and tormented being-an
ever-thinking man." In the libret-
to, Ulysses struggles with his own
identity, a question that arises
when he is asked, "Who are you,
where are you from?" He refuses
to disclose his name to the gods,
asking himself desperately, "Am
I perhaps nobody?"
Near the end of opera these
"agonizing questions and futile

By THOMAS R. COPI
Did you miss the wild saloon
gunfight in "Destry Rides Again?"
Did you miss the suspense of
the deadly hide and seek game
in "High- Noon?" Didk you miss
the Front Street showdown be-
tween the good guys and the bad
guys in "Gunfight at the OK Cor-
ral?"

babblings are all he is left. with," Don't despair. You can see all
Dallapiccola said, until one mo- these and more (oh so much
ment when "the starsappear in a more) ind"Rough Night in Jeri-
new light . . . he feels he is dis- cho," now showing at the State
covering God, and is delivered Theatre.
from his solitude." See, there's this Villain (Dean
"Thus," the composer says, "my Martin) who came to Jericho a
Ulysses becomes the symbol of while back to clean up the town.
modern man." Well, he cleaned it up, but in-
Before. the lecture, printed dia- stead of riding off into the sun-
grams that illustrated parallels set, he stayed around. Now, in-
between episodes in Dallapiccola's stead of pulling down $50 a
libretto were passed out. He ad-, month as sheriff, he owns 51
mitted trat "only after beginning per cent of everything in the city.
to prepare this paper did I dis- Everything, that is, but the stage
cover some of these parallels." He line, which is owned by this un-
said this was an example of how reasonable woman (Jeam Sim-
Imans). She loved him' when he
the artist's subconscious works, as I
descibe byNiezsce'side ofwas that poor $50 per month sher-
described by Nietzsche's idea of iff, but doesn't love him any more,
the abyss. because now he's a Villain.
In writing music, Dallapiccola But the pressure's on, and he
has been most influenced by the wants his 51 per cent of that
writing of Marcel Proust and stage line (it's sort of a point of
James Joyce. His "Ulysses" draws honor).
its theme from the works of Homer Then who should ride into town
and Joyce, and many of its images but (you guessed it) the Hero
from Alfred, Lord Tennyson andb(oguepp) thsHeso
Thoms Man. is oera"NightI (George Peppard ). ,But this is a
Thomas Mann. His opera i smart Hero; he plays the odds.
Flight" is based on the novel byAnd wren he sees the situation in
Antoine de St. Exupery. Jericho, he figures that the best
Dallapiccola recently retired bet would be for him to leave as
from the Conservatory of Florence, soon as possible. But his Partner
and in the U.S. has been composer- (John McIntire) doesn't want to
in-residence at the Tanglewood go. He wants to stay and save
Institute, Queen's College, and the the town from the Villain. But
University of California. our Hero is adamant. No sir, he's
I- --.- --O-R-O

not going to stick around and get
killed.
Of course he sticks around. Of
course hegets the meek towns-
folk to help him rid the town
of the Villain's gang in a couple
of scenes that shame the St. Val-
entine's Day Massacre.
Of course the Villain kills the
Hero's Partner. Of courseour
Hero is there when his Partner
dies; and gallops off after the
Villain, who snuck away in the
middle of all the shooting; and
catches up with him so they can
have that dramatic peekaboo
game with .45's. And of course he
gets wounded, and it looks like
all is lost. And of course it isn't.
But that's the way it is through-
out the entire movie. It's an ex-
tended cliche. Things from near-
ly every other western movie ap-
pear again in "Rough Night in
Jericho." Predictable scenes: a
man getting shot off a rooftop
during a gunfight. Predictable
lines: "Look out! It's a trap!"
And yet the actors take them-
selves too seriously for the movie
to be an effective parody.
Phone 434-0130
E A r CARPENTER ROAD
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But then again, it's not suppos-
ed to be a parody. It's a blood-
and-guts western, as advertised.
The vibrant living color that
makes the panoramic views of the
old west so beautiful is also used
to advantage when the bad guys
receive both barrels at point blank
range. (Jeez, that's realistic!)
It seems that Hollywood, in its!
never-ending search for that new
twist, that unusual story, has sim-
ply given up. It's gone back to
making movies by time-tested,
neat, predictable formulas.
But so what. Even though you
know exactly what is going to
happen, it's still fun trying to
figure out exactly how it will. k

shortened because of construction
and road work.
Buses from the central cam-
pus will go out Fuller Road to
North Campus Blvd. and Beal
Ave. They will go north on Beal
to Bishop. west on Bishop to
Cram Circle, and south on Cram
Circle to Hubbard, picking up pas-
sengers from the Northwood
Apartments.
Buses will go west on Hubbard
to the Baits Houses, then back
east on Hubbard to the rear of
Bursley Hall. They will head back M
to the Central Campus via Mur-
fin St., North Campus Blvd. and
Fuller Road.

I DAVID0. SELZMCKSPRPOUCTIONOFMARGARETMITCHEILS

I

University buses will resume
lime-Tested, Predictable Norm their full North Campus route on
Tuesday. The route had been

By JOYCETBURCH
With one simple, courteous ges-
ture, Jean Piaget bridges the gap
between renowned and influential
scholar and fumbling, student. By
way of beginning an interview, he
crosses the room, takes the prof-
fered hand, and says "I am Pia-
get." His interpreter has to do
the rest of his English speaking
for .him, but communication has
been established.
Commenting to The Daily on
his week at the University, Pia-
get said, "I've worked a lot and
gI havesurvived. Tf my interpreter
were not so efficient, I would
be underground by now.n
In addition to two lectures and
several question and answer ses-
sions, Piaget visited a class on
the function of perception in
thought. He said 'that he was
very impressed with the level of
questions which were asked.
Oct. 3 he visited the Perry
School in Ypsilanti, a federally
funded nursery school which had
been opened only five days ear-
lier. Working with 10 classes of
underprivileged children, the
school uses a methodology bas-
ed on Prof. Piaget's concepts of
cognitive development. One such
practice employed by the school
is .to have the children learn to
recognize shapes by handling var-
led shaped objects.
As a child, Piaget himself was
regarded as quite a prodigy. He
published an article on an albino
ssparrow at the age of 10 and was
known as an expert On land mol-
lusks by the age of 15.
He made a statement at a
University reception that it was
possible to telescope development
too much, so that the.child might
not develop all of the skills nor-
mal to a particular stage of
growth. Asked if this could have
been the case with him, since he
is reputed to have been quite lit-
tle when he first became a schol-
ar, he replied, "I'was not 10 when
I wrote the article, I was 11. And
I was not little. Little means pre-
operational and I was not pre-
operational. I was just going along
slowly, like the Swiss."
He added that the speed at
which a child reaches a level has
nothing to do with intelligence.
The rate of development depends,
on the nervous system and the
collective environment of the
child. In some cultures the rhythm
of life is slower than in others.
Piaget had some caustic
thoughts on the usemof intelli-
gence tests. He said, "I.Q. tests
give the final result, but they do
not show the mechanism by which
the results are reached. If in-
stead of asking the student to an-
swer your questions, you asked
him questions he would like to see
used, you would be able to tell a
great deal more about his men-
tal development. It is very dif-
ficult to make such an exam.
Assessing a student's ability takes
a great deal of time."
When asked if he had any
thoughts about the University of
Michigan, Piaget said that he
was surprised that there were so
few scholarships available. "You
must lose a lot of intellectual tal-
ent that way. Unless a student's
family has money, he is not sure
oZ being supported."

At the University of Geneva, he
explained, about nine-tenths of
the students are on scholarship.
"If a student has got what it
takes, there is no question about
his receiving financial support."
At the Psychology Colloquium
Oct. 5, the professor discussed the
development of memory. Accord-
ing to the research he has done,
memory in a child may be bet-
ter six months after an event
than it is one hour or a day aft-
erwards. He attributed this to the
development of the structure of a
child's mind. The encoded mem-
ory will change according to the
development of a schema in the
mind.
Operative memory; which is a
memory repeatable and gener-
izable in an action, is kept in the
ntellectual schema. The figura-
tive aspect of memory, the pres-
ervation of knowledge, must be
based on the operative schema.
"Memory is inconsistent, vague
and fluid," Piaget said, "unless
it can be based on intellectual
schema which are the very basis
of intellectual structure."
Program Information 2-6264
LAST 2 DAYS
Who says
they used to?
i~We just did.
GEORGE DERN
PEPPARD IARRTIN
A U14IVERSAL PICTURE 'rECHNICOLORa
1:10-3:10-5:10-7:15-9:20
STARTS
THURSDAY

CLARK GABLE A1inm
VIV E I L GII Awr
LESLIE HIOWVAl)OLIVdelklAVILLXND
A SELZNICK INTERNATIONAL PICIURE 'VICTORhNNGJO MRlEIRO GOLO'tNAYER1i. ,a,
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DESERVED SEAT TICKETS NOW AT BOX-OFFICE OR BY MAil
Box office Ooen Orchestra Center Upper
12 Noon to 9ip.m.. & Loge Balcony Balcony M A I O
ALL EVENINGS:..........$3.00 $2.50 $1.80 I M
MATINEES: (Sun. & Holidays). 3.00 2.50 1.80
TINEES: (Saturdays).... 2.50 2.00 1.50
MTINEES: (Wednesdays)..2.00 1.75 1.50 }
VEN ING~S atR8:00 P.M. (Exepnt SUNDlAYS at 7:00flDM_ T EA R

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SHOWING

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>X EASTERN THEATRESi-X"--
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375 No. MAPLE RD. .769-1300

Feature Times:
2:00-5:10
8:30

Shown at
9:15 Only

I

I

MOM"

4muml

ALL MATINEES at 2:00 P.M
Please mail sell-addressed envelone with your check or money
order made payable to Madison Theatre. for Theatre Party and
Group Sales call Woodrow Praught at 963.3538.

at Grand Circus Pk.
962-6933
Detroit, Michigan

I

Ends
Wednesday

TOO
is Q;.
CIasOk

ll

THE MIRISH CORPORATION PRESENTS
JULIE ANDREWS-MAX VON SYDOW-RICHARD HARRIS
in THE GEORGE POY HIL. WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION ar"HAWAII "PANAVISION- COLOR h,1et1xe

I

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CLAUDIA CARDINALE
A
Nit
Thursday
Director's Festival
7 CLASSICS
I N 14 DAYS

"PERFECT
TRO
TOo
-JUIT CRST

POITIER
in JAMES CLAVELL'S
WITH
LOVE'9
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9:07

IC

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fj

OPENS TONIGHT!

UI

_ '

4

j0FAM P* I
0amman

THIS WEEK AT
1421 HILL STREET

A

8:30 P.M.
Wednesday-HOOT NIGHT!-with Dave Siglin, Bob White, Sara
Melton, Bob Franke, Noel Saxe, and many others. 50c
Bring an instrument and sing along.
Thursday-A PANEL ON POT-with John Roserear, author of Pot, a
Mandbook of Marijuana
Eugene Standenmaier-.Detective Lieutenant of the Ann Arbor
Police Department
Dr. Albert F. Schneider-Pathology professor at Wayne State
Medical School
Friday and Saturday-BOB WHITE-(from San Diego, California)
returns-singing ballads, children's songs, and folk music, play-
ing guitar, banjo, and autoharp. Bob did the Woody Guthrie

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