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October 10, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-10

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10;1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1907 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

_.

Court To Ponder
Draft Card Issue
Justice Department Requests Ruling
On Constitutionality of Burning Ban

Talks Begin
In Wildcat
Steel Strike
State Official Hopes.
Settlement Possible
Within Next Two Days
PITTSBURGH () - Parties in
the eight-state steel haulers
strike met in a marthon' session
yesterday "seriously trying to find
areas of agreement" in the vio-
lence-packed dispute.
"Everyone has been coopera-t
tive.* Everyone is seriously trying
to find areas of agreement, and
they recognize the problems,"
said Secretary of Labor William,
J. Hart of Pennsylvania.

PREPARE FOF '68:
National Democrats Back War;
13 States Push Loyalty Pledge

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The Supreme
Court announced yesterday it
will decide whether the 1965 fed-
eral law that forbids the burning
of draft cards is constitutional.
At the same time the court
will decide if a draft card burner
can be sent to prison for not pos-
sessing his card
The Justice Department had
asked the court to hear the case
after the U.S. Circuit Court in
Boston ruled unanimously that
the 1965 law abridges free speech
and is therefore unconstitutional.

Earl Warren

Clark Say s
Missile Plan
BlastsHopes
WASHINGTON' (P) , Sen.
Joseph S. Clark (D-Pa.) yesterday
said that the decision to build a
thin anti-ballistic missile system
is likely to "crush the hopes for
an arms control agreement",with
Russia.
If this happens, he told the
Senate, the losers will be "all of
us, everyone, and particularly
those who will be hardest hit by
the fact that money that should
be going into the effort to rebuild
our cities and heal the wounds in
our society is being drained off
to build Armageddon instead.
"Americans who will be de-
prived of a chance to get an ade-
quate education, necessary health
care, a decent place to live, a
r chance for a job, for lack of funds
-they will be the biggest losers.
"But the real, ultimate losers
are every man, woman and child
on this planet whose lives are
menaced by the threat of nuclear
war, and whose only hope for
genuine security lives in the ame-
lioration of tensions, between the
great nuclear powers and the ne-
gotiation of effective agreements
to halt the madness of the arms
race and turn mankind toward
the path to peace," Clark said.
Clark's call for reconsideration
of the decision to build the sys-
tem drew support from five other
Democrats-George S. McGovern
(S.D.), Philip A. Hart (Mich.),
Wayne Morris (Ore.), Frank
Church (Ide.), and Gaylord Nel-
son (Wis.).
The Pennsylvanian said the
planned system amounted to
"very expensive flying erector
set' which the Russians could
easily and cheaply overpower by
increasing their offensive missile
striking force."
As for the argument that the
system is justified as a defense
against Chinese missiles, Clark
said "we have the capacity to
devastate China many times over
if her leaders should be so foolish
as to initiate a nuclear exchange
with us."
THIS WEEK
WEDNESDAY
NOSFERATU
(A FREE SHOWING)
The classic telling of
the Dracula Story
THURSDAY & FRIDAY
THE MUSIC ROOM
dir. Satyajit Ray, 1958
From the director of
The Apu Trilogy.

Two U.S. Circuit Courts - in
New York City and St. Louis-
have upheld the ban on draft
card mutiliation, which Congress
added to the selective service law
in 1965. Last Februay the Su-
preme Court refused to review the
ruling by the federal court in
New York.
However, the decision bynthe
U.S. Circuit Court in Boston in
April put the federal appeals
courts in direct conflict.
The current case centers on
David P. O'Brien, 20, of Fram-
ingham, Mass., who burned his
draft card on the steps of the
South B o s t o n courthouse in
March 1966 to protest the draft.
He was sentenced to six years in
federal youth correctional institu-
tions.
Must Possess
Chief Judge Bailey Aldrich of
the Boston federal appeals court
said O'Brien could stand con-
victed for not possessing his draft
card-but could not be convicted
for burning it.
"In singling out persons engag-
ing in protest for special treat-
ment the amendment strikes at
the very core .of what the first
amendment protects," Aldrich
said.
The Justice Department said in
appealing that if Congress may
require a draft registrant to carry
his draft card "it would appear
that it may also forbid him to
destroy or mutilate his card."
Private Schools
In other action, the Supreme
Court rejected a bid to review a
Pennsylvania law that requires
transportation in public school
buses of ;pupils attending non-
profit parochial and private
schools. ,
The court announced in a brief
unsigned opinion that it had dis-
missed an appeal asking it to ex-
amine the law, "for want of a
substantial federal question."
The Supreme Court also re-
fused to reexamine the contempt
of court convictions of the Rev.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and
seven other Negro ministers who
led desegregation demonstrations
in Birmingham in 1963.
This means Dr. King, head of
the Southern Christian Leader-
ship Conference, and the other
ministers can be jailed at once.
Last June the court affirmed
by a 5-4 vote the convictions of
the eight ministers for holding
the Good Friday and Easter Sun-
day demonstrations in violation
of an Alabama court order.
Southern Integration
The Supreme Court also re-
fused to review a historic deci-
sion by the U.S. Circuit Court in
New^ Orleans calling for top-to-
bottom integration of all public
school systems in six southern
states.'
The high court gave no expla-
nation in announcing that it
would not hear appeals from the
March 29 decision filed in behalf
of six Louisiana and three Ala-
bama school boards. This means
the decision is left standing-and
serves to give it added weight as
a precedent for courts elsewhere.

t
3
i
I
1
i
s

But representatives of 13 West-
ern states, meeting in advance of
the National Committee's formal
ratification of the choice of Chi-

-Associated Press
JOHN M. BAILEY, Democratic National Committee chairman,
leans over seated Gov. Richard Hughes of New Jersey for a con-
ference today during the committee meeting in Washington.
$4.4 BILLION:
Governors, Hit Request
For Highway fCutback

Hart, who came out of the cago for the convention site voted Because of the activity of anti-J
meeting at the prompting of unanimously to back a loyalty
newsmen asking for some indica- oath under which individual dele-
tion of progress, said he was gates would have to give their
neither optimistic or pessimistic. word that they would support the w
"Anything you might say might ticket in the general election. o i e1
blow an agreement out of the The resolution supporting John-
water," Hart said. But another son's conduct of policy in Viet- By The Associated Press
official said he thought a solution, nam said the President "has PARIS-Andre Maurois, whose
could be found within two days. sought an honorable resolution of humor and humanism distinguish-
Gov. Raymond P. Shafer of the conflict in South Vietnam, by ed him as a giant of modern
Pennsylvania, who convened the which the people of that nation French literature, died Monday at
meeting, warned there must be a might be freed of terror and 82.
stop to the "campaign of terror'' bloodshed, and enabled to govern His numerous biographical works
no matter what came out of the themselves in conditions of free- combined an astute sense of psy-
gathering. dom and social justice." ' chological insight together with a
Pennsylvania state police re- At its opening session the com- characteristic light and human
port that 28 persons have been mittee heard national chairman touch. Maurois was equally esteem-
arrested and dozens injured in John M. Bailey urge members to ed as a historian.
more than 400 incidents since the get out and fight for Johnson's M
strike turned violent a month ago. reelection, which he said would . MERIDIAN. Miss.-An all-white
The president of Latrobe Steel not be easy. He said the polls in- jury, seven women and five men.
Co., Marcus W. Saxman III, said dicate the going is rough now, was picked today for the trial of
{ Co, MrcusW. axma II, sad,'a sheriff, a Ku Klux Klan leader
the strike has caused a state of particularly with regard to Viet- and 16 other men charged with
anarchy on Pennsylvania's high- nam, but predicted the situation conspiracy in the death of three
ways. He called on Shafer to end will change before the 1968 vot- civil rights workers in 1964.
it. Img. rl inlr o q7v~rnr

WASHINGTON ({)-Democratic in effect, is running in the polls'
National Committee members yes- against Superman, who can do
terday endorsed President John- no wrong."
son's war course, and predicted The loyalty-oath plan, aimed
he will be renominated unani- primarly at dump-Johnson move-
mously and reelected by a big ments instigated by some Demo-,
margin. cratic dissenters on Vietnam,
By a voice vote the committee E would apply also to Southern
unanimously ratified the choice critics of Johnson's racial inte-
of Chicago as the 1968 nominat- gration policies.
ing convention for the ikeek of Cailfornia National Committee-
Aug. 25. man Eugene Wyman said in an

interview he intends to lay this
proposal before a special equal
rights committee headed by Gov.
Richard Hughes of New Jersey:

WASHINGTON (IP)--The John-
son administration has struck an-t
other politically sensitive nerve int
its tussle with Congress over taxes)
and spending cuts, and cries oft
protest are rising across the land.I
The outcries from state capitals
are in response to telegrams that
went out from Washington Sundayi
inviting all the governors to com-
ment "as rapidly as possible" onj
what would happen if their federal
highway aid funds were held back.
Secretary of Transportation Alan
S. Boyd disclosed Monday that
he sent the telegrams, advising
that cutbacks of as much as 80
per cent are being considered in
current and prospective allocations
for the $4.4-billion-a-year federal
highway-aid program.
Anti-Inflation
A spokesman in Boyd's office
emphasized that the aim would
be to delay highway construction
projects as an anti-inflationaryI
measure, and not to cut them outl
altogether. A similar freeze was
ordered last November and grad-
ually lifted when the threat of in-i
flation began to subside.I

Many of those protesting ac-
cused the administration of using
the threat of a road-fund cut to
build pressure for approval of a
tax increase which Congress has
refused to consider until federal
spending is cut deeply. Johnson
says his proposed 10 per cent sur-
tax is needed to combat inflation.
Boyd's telegrams were another
followup to President Johnson's
temporary freeze on non-vital
spending commitments, and it
triggered an immediate predictable
reaction.
Trust Fund
All of the money that would be
held back comes from the federal
highway trust fund, which is fed
mainly by a 4-cents-a-gallon gas-
oline tax.
Late last week the Pentagon an-
nounced a halt in the awarding of
contracts for the politically im-
portant rivers and harbors projects
hahdled by the Army Engineers.
It also announced a hold-down on
all future commitments for mili-
tary housing and other non-Viet-
nam projects.

As the steel haulers, Teamsters
Union officials, trucking execu-
tives and state house representa-
tivgs from seven states sat down
for the first time. Shafer demand-
ed "that all violence end im-
mediately."

"Right now, pollsters are run-
ning President Johnson against
everybody," Bailey said. "And
none of these Everybodys is re-
quired to take a firm stand on
any issue.
"This means President Johnson,

Chnarged un er a .-year-oi
Reconstruction era law, the men
are accused of conspiracy to vio-
late the civil rights of Michael
Schwerner, 23. and Andrew Good-
man, 20, both white New Yorkers,
and James E. Chaney. 21, a Meri-
dian Negro. Conviction could bring

' war Democrats in California, Wy-
man said he thinks the partly has
to face up to what it is going to
do about dissenters who might be
elected as delegates and then re-
fuse to support Johnson if he is
re-nominated as expected.
Illinois national commyitteeman
Jacob M. Arvey said he does not
have much worry about civil
rights demonstrations at the con-
vention.
"I'm much more worried about
these anti-war demostrators, but
I am sure that Chicago authori-
ties can cope, with them," Arvey
said.
~Round up
a maximum sentence of up to 10
years in prison and a $5,000 fine.
LAGOS, Nigewria-Nigerian'fed-
eral forces have opened a fourth
front in their drive to crush the
rebellion of Biafra, the army re-
ported today. U% said federal troops
seized a Niger River bridge about
65 miles west of the Biafra capital
of Enugu and were shelling the
market town of Onitsha on the
eastern end of the bridge.
LONDON-Two British histori-
ans forecast Monday a fourth
Arab-Israeli war-which they said
Israel may nbt win, unless the
Palestine refugee question is set-
tled
The war they envisaged would
be neither the classical conflict
of the past nor a Vietnam-type
guerrilla struggle but "intercom-
munal friction-the sniper at the
upper window, the grenade lofted
into the coffee house."

gm

CONTROVERSY 67.
UNION-LEAGUE presents
BARRY GOLDWATER
H ILL AUDITORIUM
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8 3 P.M.
TICKETS ON SALE: Students REACTOR PANEL
FRIDAY, OCT. 6 $1.00 oWES VIVIAN
FormerDemocrat Congressman
Diag-9:00 SHAW LIVERMORE
Union-I 1 :00-2:00 Non-Students Prof. of History
DANIEL FUSFELD
SUNDAY, OCT. 8 $.50 Prof. of Economics
Hill Aud$-1:301ROBERT BLACKWELL
State Labor Mediator
Invitations to Reception at UAC offices-Union

U.

Wednesday & Thursday
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
- Student Laboratory Theatre

4:10 P.M.

presents
OVERRULED
by GEORGE BERNARD SHAW
OCTOBER 11th.& 12th
Arena Theatre, Frieze Building
ADMISSION FREE

I

1r

'""'""""""'"

HOMECOMING '67 * HOMECOMING '67 * HOMECOMING '67 * HOMECOMING '67
,UNION-LEAGUE /
DOROTHY AND THE WIZARD OF OZ
PRESENT
"DOORS TO THE WIZARD'S LAB"

presents

THE SIXTH ANNUAL

featu ring
THE DOORS-

DANCE1M

FESTIVAL

Three Performances in Hill Auditorium

HARKNESS BALLET . . . . . . . Fri., Oct. 13,8:30
Program: Night Song; Feast of Ashes; Zealous Variations (Schubert, Op. 83); and
Time Out of Mind

OLAETA BASQUE FESTIVAL

... . Sun., Oct.22,8:30

Dancers, singers, and instrumentalists combine to provide dances and music of the
Basque country-seven provinces on both sides of the Pyrenees, both in Spain and in
France
JOSE MOLINA BAILES ESPANOLES... Fri., Oct. 27, 8:30

I

with
The Long Island Sound

Program of Spanish songs and dancing, including folk, classical, and flamenco

II

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