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October 06, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-06

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PAGE TWO.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8.1967

:PGETW ~l MC~fN ALYFRDA.OCflIR _E

- a a ayaa vw: i vuu v, "UV

Tt .atre Wurfel Discusses Viet Disencha
U I l ) P ayers S ine 1in K ig Johnl By STUART GANNES stroying Vietnamese society, and position to govern with the Com- ly marred by "the closing of three
"The Vietnamese have become was "driving people into the hands munists." newspapers and the continuation1
o/disenchanted with continuing the of the Communists." Prof. Wur- However, Wurfel concluded that of censorship, as well as by threats+
war any further because they have fel of the University of Missouri U.S. pressure for the military slate against some campaign workers
lost faith in the Saigon regime political science department.spent combined with large scale fraud given credibility by instances of
after observing large scale fraud- last year as an associate visiting ratvde nn d b fii1 nff. government terrorism in the re- 1

ntment
Vietnamese from whatever sup-
port they had for American pres-
ence there. Wurfel said that "Na-
tionalism in Vietnam is an effeb-
tive and powerful force, and over
90 per cent of the eo le sun ort

r
a''
r,

By JOYCE PIELL
"King John" is a history play
about history. Political self-inte-'
rest' is more significant than psy-
chological motivation. Despite the
obstacles to characterization the
play presents, the University Play-.
ers performed admirably last night
in' Trueblood Auditorium.

. Philip Faulconbridge, the King's
bastard cousin, is the most inte-
resting personality since he de-
velops from a swash-bucking, glib
and. utterly charming opportunist
to become the King's most devoted
patriot. To Peter Coffield's credit,
he was sincere in both roles, and
his reform was convincing.

More easily convincing is his
foil, the French Dauphin (Robert
Sevra), who abandons his honor-
able service to the Papal Legate
to assert France's interest above
Rome.
The technique of contrasting
two similar characters guided the
portrayal of the King's mother
(Holly Villaire) and Constance
(Katherine Ferrand), mother of
the claimant to the throne. The
young Constance ranged from re-
gal restraint to passionate grief
expressing her ambition for her
son, but the old Queen mother
forced her words from a source as

ulent practices in the recent elec-
tions," said Prof. David Wurfel,
recently returned from observing
the South Vietnamese elections.
Speaking Wednesday night at
the "America in Crisis" teach-in,
Wurfel questioned the success of
the September 15 vote, and of U.S.
strategy. He said that by remain-
ing in Vietnam, the U.S. was de-

professor in the University's poli-
tical science department.
Wurfel contended that the elec-
tionscould have been a step to-
ward peace and toward agn even-
tual reunification of Vietnam if
they had been conducted without
fraud. He said that had the elec-
tions been fair, "the Saigon gov-
ernment would be in a strong

APA Takes Crowd
Along With Them,

s ruyeu any oene lcla eflects VG111.1 C1101 1 l C
that the elections might have had, cent past."
Wu'rfel claimed the election Wurfel concluded by saying that
fraudulent on several grounds: "The Vietnamese were more in-
"Fraud on the election day was censed about what they regarded
extensive," he said, "perhaps pro- as the deceiving report of the of-
ducing 300,000 to 500,000 votes ficial American observers than
and inflating the total number of they were about the behavior of
votes by the same number; in ad- their own government, especially
dition, there were hundreds of sice they considered the results
thousands of votes produced by of the election predetermined by
pressure extended by the govern- U.S. backing for Generals Thieu
ment through the civil and mili- and Ky."
tary service." Wurfel later added Wurfel feels that by continu-
that he had collected evidence of ing its present course in Viet-
fraud including instancesof peo- nam the U.S. is alienating the
ple voting more than once and of
precincts reporting turnouts which
proved to be more than 100 per
cent of the registered voters in
that precinct. Wurfel discovered
that people were unable to vote
because of a supposed shortage of
ballots even though the govern-

reunification. If our policy con-
tinues for another year, many
people will choose to support the
NLF."
Wurfel would like to see the U.S.
negotiate as soon as possible; he
said, "Our position is weakening,
the longer things go on the less
we will have to negotiate."
Wurfel added that the "Amer-
ican involvement in Vietnam has
bec n'one of total self-deception,"
and "Americans have replaced
French colonial interests in Viet-
nam."

By BOB and BETSY SMITH
Turn on, tune in, drop out. If
anything, that's the message of
.Hart and. Kaufman's "You, Can't
Take It, With You." This delight-
'uly dated comedy, presented by
tihe APA, has just played its last
night for this- season at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater, so if you
missed it you have to wait until
next year or catch it at Expo. (The
APA is the only American troupe
inited ,to Montreal.)
Grandpa Vanderhof is a true ex-
nentd1 of the philosophy of the
} sychedelic generation. One day,
he went tip to his office in'the
elevator and came right (down
agai. Thirty-five lazy years later,
in hl% dihnertime chats with God,
whom he speaks to as to his own
giandfather, we feel his sense of
satisfaction with his free-wheel-
A 'Eryhmy'
Art Program-
At Barbour
By BARRY COHEN
Margue:te Lundgren-Harwood,
director of the London School of
Eurytf, will present a series of
s lectiorns of"visible' speech and
visible song"on Saturday, Oct. 7,
i th}- arbjoUr bymnasium at
EUrthriy is "an part which seeks
the most complete artistic expres-
s n by using- "the whole body as
aW instrument of gesture." In it a
dncer, the eurythmist, or com-
pO~ny of dancers perform in ac-
companiment with musical or
poetc recitations.
Vi"f: Ernest Katz of the physics
departmet, who has seen per-
formances of eurythmy in both
Elrope- and Aerica, says "The
(dance) movements are composed
ot of ioiements belonging to
sounds." The eurythmy which re-
sults "canI have all the beauty of
the poem from which it comes."
'Eurythmy is still young and ex-
panding, Katz said. It was begun
in:Switzerland in 1912 by dancers
working out suggestions of the
Austrian philosopher Rudolf Stei-
ner. Several professional schools of
eurythmy.train the performers.
The performance is being spon-
'sored by the Concert Dance Or-
ganization of the Women's Ath-
l tc Association and the speech
and art departments. Katz, who
knows the performers personally,
'acted as intermediary in arranging
their appearances.
The program will include se-
lections of drama, music, poetry,
rnd prose. Several selections from
"hakespeare will be given, includ-
ing "Hamlet" and "The Merchant
of Venice." Beethoven, Bach, Cho-
)in, Debussy's "Des pas sur ;la,
neige," and Scarlatti's "Sonata in
P Mapor" will contribute to the
musical part of the eurythmy. Also
included are selections from Dag
$ammarskjold's "Markings," T. S.
a liiot's "The Hollow Men," Kath-
leen Raine and Owen Barfield.
Lo
TOP
/Pc
S 1 M~z~iwnj f~

deep as her jealous protection of
ing life. In fact, the whole family teKn.
the King...
reflects an unconcern with pro-r
priety from the balletic daughter Like the lady he protects, the
Essie, to the fire-cracking father, French king (John Knox) opposes
Paul Sycamore. his consistent strength to King
John's mercurial temperament.
If there's anything irritating to Although John (Jack McLaughlin)
modern .audiences in this play, it's must be erratic, the extremes oft
the broad stereotypes that so ob- his temper need not have been
viously dance across the stage in marked by shouting rage or a
couples at the very end of theqmvrng lypshopeng gora
production. The thirties had its qivdeigstre pswe kns and
Negroes on relief, its dyspeptic inability to realize his heroic po-
business men, its bored business tential as defender of England
wives, its trouble with the income against France or Rome were al-
tax. ways apparent. Except for the ex-
What every age lacks, however, tremes of emotion, he was appro-
is the richness of the aimless (ex- priately arrogant rather than
cept in the most immediate ways) proud and insinuating rather than
happiness of the Vanderhofs and accusing.
Sycamores. To us, it seems a dream The supporting cast was distin-
world,?a lived fantasy. The APA guished by Philip's legitimate
creates characters who believably brother (John Slade) who looked,
wander into a house and stay five like the idiot he was supposed to
or eight years, who would rather be and Hubert (Robert Elliott),
be declared dead than receive the King's friend, whose brus-
guests with whom they cannot be queness made the scene with the
what their imaginations fancy young claimant more moving than
from moment to moment. tenderness could have..
Dee Victor, whether typing "Sex To maintain a rapid pace, Di-
Tales a Holiday," or finishing a rector Richard Burgwin utilized
long-discarded canvas of Mr. De the aisles and a multi-level set.
Pinna as the Discus Thrower, ex- The early tableaux of the first
hibited to great advantage her in- act where the actors froze to em-
fectious laugh and fluttering phasize the Bastard's asides were
hands. I as effective as the battle scenes.
Helen Hayes was brilliant as the The battles were notable for tak-
blintze-cooking Grand 'Countess ing place in the lobby: only the
Olga. Her sense of timing, and flash, noise and music of the
her mastery of voice and gesture clash entered the theatre.
were like a natural phenomenon. During the siege of Angiers, the
Her countryman, the Russian Mayor and aCitizen of the city
dancing master, played by Keene watched the battle and tried to
Curtis, glowed with vitality. reflect the action in their atti-
The plot of the play is boy tudes as well as in their speeches.
meets girl, or as it develops, fai- Td
jly meets family. But the real The language. and action were
question the play poses is, can handled smoothly and forcefully.
willful irresponsibility be justified? The intensity of action was es-
It's perhaps a little hard to de- pecially well-controlled and var-
cide whether the play answers ied in the first act. Immediately
this question in an altogether sat- captivated by the Bastard, the
isfactory way. audience enjoyed the complusory
At the end, the Kirbys seem to geneological exposition and poli-
be evolving away from Wall Street tical conflicts of the first act and
and towards: selfyrealization. But appreciated the later efforts to
who takes the burden of pointing make the two Queen mothers, and
out the path to enlightentent? the kings more human.
Mrs. Sycamore poo-poohs spirit- Although these scenes-especial-
ualism, and the various hobbies of ly that of Constance's grief -
the family seem to splinter them
in the midst of their togetherness. may have seemed excessively dra-
But, really, why look for answers matic, the dialogue justified her
to big questions? Perhaps it's agonizing. In spite of the play,
enough, at least for now, just to the players made Shakespeare
be very well entertained, worthy of his reputation.

For other teach-in articles
See page 10
.i.i::1i :":.;.;i :i .i ? i; i ti.ti,**,,
ment printed two million extra
ballots before the election, and
which presently can't be accounted'
for.
Wurfel pointed out that instead
of the alleged 35 per cent vote
for the military ticket, a figure1
closer to 25 per cent was more
appropriate, and in this context
the Vietnamese willingness to sup- i
port relatively unknown peace
candidates seemed much stronger.
Wurfel alsq stated that the ex-
clusion of the candidacies of Gen-
eral Duong Van Minh and Dr.
Au Truong Thanh denied the peo-
ple of South Vietnam "true free-
dom of choice and was achieved
largely by illegal means; both
men were more popular than any
of the candidates who did run."
He claimed that the relative
freedom of the campaign was bad-
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THESE PHOTOGRAPHS obtained by Prof. David Wurfel in
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during the September elections there, Although barely legible
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claims that the
high as 500,000.

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