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October 06, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6,_1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Senate Refuses To Cut
Poverty Appropriation

UN DEBATES WAR:
Nationalist China, Thailand Hit

-Associated Press
PRESIDENT JOHNSON TODAY held a press conference with
reporters to discuss his request for higher taxes. Johnson said "it
is neither necessary nor wise" for Congress to postpone action on
a tax hike until federal spending cuts have been determined.
LBJ Asks Tax Hike
Before Spending Cut

WASHINGTON (A)-The Sen-
ate rejected yesterday President
Johnson's proposal to cut back
antipoverty program funds by
$198 million. Instead, they voted
a measure providing a two-year
extension of the program which
faces an uncertain outlook in the
House.
The bill would authorize ap-
propriations up to $2.25 billion for
the Office of Economic Oppor-
tunity in the current fiscal year,
and $2.4 billion in the year start-
ing next July 1.
The Senate voted 50 to 36
against a Republican move to
cut the current year's authoriza-
tion to the $2.06 billion proposed
by Johnson, and then passed the
bill 60 to 21.
Kennedy Programis
Much.of the $198 million which}
Johnson wanted was returned by
the Senate Labor Committee to
new or expanded programs spon-
sored by Sens. Robert F. Kennedy
(D-NY), and Edward M. Kenne-
dy (D-Mass) who flew back from
the World Series in Boston to:
opppose deletion of the added,
money.
These include :
-A $35-million day-care pro-{
gram for children on welfare,
making it possible for their moth-
ers to take jobs.
-$83 million for a special im-
pact program to improve condi-
tions in slum areas with a high
concentration of impoverished
families.
-$40 million extra for com-
munity action for family plan-
ning, additional health services
and extra assistance for the elderly
poor.
-$25 million for aid. to small
business firms in low-income
areas.
-$3 million for VISTA-Volun-
teers in Service to America.
-$2 million for .migrant work-
ers.
Continue Others
In addition to the new projects,
all of the present antipoverty pro-<
grams would be financed by thet
bill, including the Job Corps, the
Neighborhood Youth Corps, Com-
munity Action which covers such
programs as Head Start, rural
loans and aid to migrant workers.
Eliminated from the bill was a
$2.8-billion emergency job plan
for unemployed and low-income
persons, which the Johnson ad-
ministration opposed.
In the House, the Education and
Labor Committee has been work-
ing on its own version of anti-
poverty legislation. Administration
leaders expect a strong fight when
it reaches the floor.

Demand To Halt Viet
UNITED NATIONS (AP)-Nation- "Such pressures do not, there-CWi
alist China and Thailand yester- fore, have the effect of bringing do
day deplored the rising clamor for the war in Vietnam to a speedy bo
a halt in the U.S. bombing of conclusion: on the contrary, they m'
North Vietnam. They told the UN can only prolong the conflict and an
General Assembly that the de- delay a peaceful settlement."Y
mands only encourage the Coin- Foreign Minister Thanat Kho- ko
inunists to continue the Vietnam- !ian of Thailand hit at "the go
ese war. strong advocacies by some quarters pe
But Communist Yugoslavia and that the aggressors should be ap- dii
Mongolia immediately joined in peased" and "their life and prop- ter
the anti-bombing campaign. That erty should not be molested by ub
made a total of 25 countries de- ara obn.
manding an end to the bombing aerial bombing."
out of 59 that spoke in the 122- Meanwhile, he said, Hanoi con- th
he sid, anoi fro:
nation assembly's general debate. tinues to disdain' any prospect of tr
The list included eight Com- meaningful negotiations except on sid
munist countries, seven countries its
in Africa and Asia, three in Latin own terms and thinks it canva
America, two Nordic neutirals and
five U.S. allies in the North At-
lantic Treaty Organization-Bel-
gium. Canada, France, Denmark W orld News
and Norway.

-Associated Press
NATIONALIST CHINESE FOREIGN MINISTER Wei Tao-ming
yesterday told the United Nations General Assembly that demands
to end U.S. bombing in Vietnam only serve to incite the enemy.
LABOR OPPOSES:
Wilson To Continune

Roundup

WASHINGTON (P) - President
Johnson argued yesterday that it
is neither necessary nor wise for
Congress to postpone action on his
request for an income tax sur-
charge until federal spending lev-
els are decided upon.
Meantime, the administration
ordered a freeze on $350 million
worth of federal spending and the
House Appropriations Committee
reported a modest start in its ef-
fort to recapture some of the
money Congress has poured out.
With many members of the House
demanding a spending reduction
of at least $5 billion, there has
been a debate whether the reduc-
tions should be pinpointed by Con-
gress or whether the final decisions
should be left to the President.
Calls Conference
Johnson, at a news conference
called solely to discuss the taxes-
spending Issue, said the entire
nation, would pay a burdensome
inflation tax "if it fails to face up
to its responsibilities" in handling'
tax and appropriation legislation.
Johnson spoke shortly after Sec-
retary of Defense Robert S. Mc-
Namara issued a stop order on
$350 million in military construc-
tion contracts "because of the un-
certain state of federal finances."
The action carne two days after
the House Ways and Means Com-
mittee shelved further consider-
ation of Johnson's request for a
10 per cent surcharge on income
4 taxes-at least until Congress and
the President reach an under-
standing on how to reduce fed-
eral spending.
Committee Effort
At the same time, the House
Appropriations Committee stepped,
up an effort to cut down on new
appropriations and to recapture
some of the money already voted
by Congress this year.
A subcommittee in charge of
finances for the Interior Depart-
ment has voted to cancel around
$100 million of the $1.38 billion
Congress allowed the department
earlier this year.
Another subcommittee hoping
to pull back some of the $7.54 bil-
lion given the Treasury and Post
Office departments tentatively has
agreed on some restrictions. But
Chairman Tom Steed (D-Okla),
said the cutbacks won't be sen-
sational.
A third subcommittee is weigh-
ing how it can make cuts in the
$276 million recently voted to

operate the- legislative department
and related agencies.'
That leaves only one more area
in which sizeable reductions might
be considered-the $69.6 billion al-
ready appropriated for the Defense
Department.
With the cost of the war in
Vietnam rising and another emer-
gency defense bill in the offing,
it isn't likely that major slashes
will be proposed in military pro-
grams, although some Defense
Department nonwar activities may
be cut back.
There is little probability that
the committee will be able between
now and Oct. 23 to bring to the
House a rescinding bill that would
result in deep cuts in federal
spending. That is the day on which
a temporary law financing many
federal agencies expires.
There is growing support in the
House for a Republican-backed
drive to tie to the.next temporary
bill a directive to President John-
son to. do his own cutting, to the
tune of at least $5 billion.

U.S. War
SCARBOROUGH, England (R-
Prime Minister Harold Wilson's
government will continue to sup-
port President Johnson's present
policy in Vietnam despite a Labor
party vote demanding Britain's
dissociation from the U.S.
Authoritative word of the Brit-
ish leader's intentions emerged
from his aides yesterday with em-
phasis on one qualification:
If the U.S. were to escalate thez
war and so create a new situation,
the British government would
have to reconsider and perhaps
be unable to avoid public disso-
ciation. -
This has been made extremely
clear to the Johnson administra-
tion several times, informants
said.
The party convention Wednes-
day spurned fervent pleas from
Foreign Secretary George Brown
when it voted 2,752,000 to 2,613-
000 for a resolution calling on the
government "to dissociate itself
from the policy of the U.S. govei'n-

Bombing
n the war "if it manages to sow
ubts, dissension and disruption
th within and among nations
hich stand in its way to conquest
.d domination."
Yugoslav Foreign Secretary Mar-
Nikezic urged that the U.S.
vernment "take the first indis-
nsable step; that.- is, uncon-
tionally to cease bombing the
rritory of the Democratic Rep-
lic of Vietnam."
The U.S. has declined to stop
e bombing without a clear sign
om North Vietnam that nego-
ations would follow with neither
de taking any military ad-
ntage.

Support
ament in Vietnam" and to seek
with other countries an American
bombing halt over North Vietnam
"immediately, permanently and
unconditionally."
The Labor government consti-
tutionally is not bound to obey a
convention decision. These serve
only as guidance. Wilson's govern-
ment is answerable to Parliament.
The party last year voted, with'
a 1,207,000 margin, for a resolu-
tion calling for a-halt of American
bomb attacks on North Vietnam
as a step toward creating a clim-
ate for peacemaking.
The government took absolutely
no action on it.
The Laborites did support Wil-
son's bid to join the European
Common Market but a substantial
minority demanded stronger safe-
guards for British interests.
This emerged from a series of
votes' after Brown had told the'
6,000 delegates: "I do not want the
world to go on polarized between
the two vast giant American and
Russian superpowers."

Soviet Walks Out
Soviet Ambassador Platon D.
Morozov walked out on the Chi-
nese Nationalist speech.
Other Communist delegates had
not even shown up for it, and the
assembly's Communist president,
Romanian Foreign Minister Cor-
nelia Manescu, had turned the
chair over to a vice president, Or-
lando Montenegro Medrano of
Nicaragua.
Foreign Minister Wei Tao-ming
of Nationalist China told the as-
sembly chairman that Mao Tse-
tung of the Chinese Communist
party and President Ho Chi Minh
of North Vietnam "are not inte-
rested in peace" because "they
believe they are already on the
way to victory" in Vietnam.
''orced to Quit'
"The pressures that have been
exerted on the United States gov-
ernment for the cessation of bomb-
ing and for the unconditional
withdrawal of troops," he said,
"can only encourage the belief
that the United States will sooner
or later be forced by world opinion
to quit Vietnam.

By The Associated Press'
SAIGON-Intensified air strikes
and a rising number of allied
ground sweeps reflected yesterday
the grinding pace of war in which
American casualties have -now ex-
ceeded 100,000.
The roll of U.S. casualties climb-
ed to 101,034 since the first Amer-
ican combat death in 1961. Up-
dated figures show 13,643 killed,
86,635 wounded and 756 missing.
-HONG KONG-Communist 'ter-
rorists resumed planting bombs
in Hong Kong yesterday, ending
British hopes that Communist
Chinese had abandoned their cam-
paign of terror. More than 34
bombs were taken from one in-
dustrial area.
The two major Communist
newspapers, Ta Kung, Pao and
Wen Wei Pao, resumed attacks
meanwhile ,on British authorities,
calling them "fascist" and saying
they murdered a Chinese during
Communist China's National Day
celebrations Oct. 1.
* *T*A
TALLAHASSEE, Fla.-Astronaut

U

C. C. Williams was killed yester-
day when a T38 jet plane crashed
and burned in a wooded areas near
Miccosukee, Fla., space officials at
Cape Kennedy said.
Williams, a Marine Corps cap-
tain from Mobile, Ala., was the
eighth astronaut to die in the past
three years. Three others have
died in jet crashes.
.* * *'
WASHINGTON -King Hussein
of Jordan, armed with Soviet
promises for economic and mili-
tary aid, is expected to come to
ashingthn to press for American
assistance, U.S. officials said yes-
terday.
There is as yet no firm word
from Amman, capital of Jordan,
on when Hussein might come. But
there are strong indications that
the king wants to plead the Arab
cause before the UN General As-
sembly and use this opportunity
for talks In Washington, the of-
ficials said.
GUL
i
TONIGHT
at 7:00 & 9:45
The Iron Horse
dir. John:Ford, 1924
The uncut version of
Ford's monumental
epic of the "Winning
of the West;" from
one of America's
greatest Western
directors.
SATURDAY &SUNDAY
MARIUS TRILOGY
PART II: FANNY'
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
STILL ONLY 50c

WCBN
650,
U Radio in Ann Arbor

F1 ----1

ANN ARBOR DANCE THEATRE (LASSES
MODERN TECHNIQUE
Improvisation & Composition for
Non-DancersI
WEDNESDAYS-7:30 & 8:30 P.M.a
Jones School-To register, call: 665-7345
8 week course

GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE-
FRIDAY, OCT. 6
NOON LUNCHEON
25c
Team from "Vietnam Fall":
"STRATEGIES AND TACTICS OF VIETNAM FALL"
FRIDAY EVENING--6:00 P.M.
INTERNATIONAL DINNER
$1.00
(SOUTH AMERICAN)
John Gerassis, speech on tape and discussion:
F "rTHE GREAT FEAR IN LATIN AMERICA"
For Reservations Call 662-51 89 before 2:00 P.M. Friday

In consideration of the nature of the personnel 'of the organization
known as the UAC Muggers (mugger-one who robs by assault
from behind.)
And, as we the younger of the two bastions of free expression in the
Sthe realm of mass media on the University campus feel it is
time that we follow the lead of our elder brethren, the Daily
Libels, in destroying all the foes of the Good and the supporters
of Evil.
We-the WCBN Short-Circuits-do hereby issue this challenge:
OH! Wicked UAC Muggers. If you do not feel that you have
been sufficiently cleansed of your sins through mortification of
the flesh by the honorable members of the team known as the
Daily Libels, we the glorious WCBN Short-Circuits, a team re-
nown for its static play and unequaled, reception on this campus,
do challenge you to a contest of athletics-specifically football.
As the challenged, we offer you choice of time, place, and weapons.
We await only your response--as if you possess the courage to face us.
For WCBN,
MARKCLAFER,
Manager of the Short-Circuits

G.

i)

'i

TONIGHT at
H to' ARiK

1421 Hill Street
8:30 P.M.
THE APOSTLES
A FOUR-PIECE ROCK COMBO
"Nobody has as much fun as the Apostles.,.
Except those who come to see them."
(room for dancing)
SATURDAY-BOB FRANKE-singing ballads, Dylan
songs, and ORIGINAL folk music, playing guitar,
banjo, and harmonica!
and JOHN MILLER-on the bass
$1.00 cover includes entertainment and refreshments

------
UNION-LEAGUE
What's new from the in-crowd?
Why their message is clear
Have fun; make the scene at
THE HUNGRY EAR
mood music-THE LEAGUE
TONIGHT! 9:00-12:00
School clothes--$1 per couple
&
ALL YOU CAN EAT

--_6; '
/ - I

IW3.WA

presents

L'ORCHESTRE

NATIONAL FRANCAIS

(French National Orchestra)

tU

I

RY roUSE

CINEMA II
PRESENTS (
JASON ROBARDS JR.
ii
A Thousand
Clowns

Directed by MAURICE LE ROUX
Soloist: EUGENE ISTOMIN, pianist

in HILL AUDITORIUM
Monday, October 9,8:30
PROGRAM

Conderto No. 4 for Piano and Orchestra

..Beethoven

NEW

I

i

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