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September 26, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-26

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHil*r1N DAILY

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TUE: SDAX, 6LFTEMBER 26G, L1967

MUSIC
'Land of Smiles' Shows Age

Text of SGC Reply to Cutler Letter on Rules Change

By RONALD ROSENBLATT
The dim and plaintive echoes
of a dead world made themselves
heard at Hill Auditorium last
night, and the results were about
as subtle as a strudel and as deli-
cate as the smothering whipped
cream on a cup of Viennese cof-
fee.
Franz Lehar's "Das Land Des
Lachens" (The Land of Smiles)
was a grim attempt in its own
time (1931) to recapture the'lost1
glories of pre-World War I Haps-
burg, Vienna, a glittering tinsel
world which,- he immortalized in
his "The Merry Widow." But by

the time "The Land of Smiles"
was written, the Imperial ball
was over, and Lehar was reminisc-
ing for the benefit of an audi-
ence that had lived through the
terrible depression of the 1920's
and the rise of Hitler. To. bemuse
people with so many, worries,
Lehar created a fantastic concoc-
tion that would evoke a world
where Vienna was still a gay cul-
tural capitol and China a land
full of quaint and curious Orien-
tals.
Last night's performance of this
kitsch-spectacular was, in general,
a sad demonstration of how

1c;:

- cinema
'The Family Way'
Contrasting Views

A

Entertaining .
By AVIVA KEMPNE
People might come to see Pol-
tyanna. starring in her first
grown-up picture and in her first
nude.bath scene. Maybe some will
want to view this young actress
whose name is linked with a dir-
ector twice her age in the Holly-
wood gossip columns.
Or because of her past roles
and present love life others pos-
sibly will stay away. But the
curious ones who come will be
surprised to find Hayley's father
the Mills to watch. And those
who do not bother to attend "The
Family Way'' will miss an enter-
taining film.:
As the story goes, Arthur Fit-
ton (Hywel Bennet) is going to
marry Jenny Piper (Hayley
Mills) in lower class English
style. They plan to spend their
wedding night at his parents,
house and take- their honeymoon
the -next day. But complications
arise which prevent the marriage
from "taking on" the first night
and for several weeks thereafter
as the couple continue to stay at
Arthur's house.;
Inhibited in his father's house,
Arthur suffers from lack of pri-
vacy and the constant repri-
mands of his father for "read-
ing books and listening to clas-
sical music." Bennet plays this
part with sensitivity and develops
a character with whom one must
cuipathize. .
Jenny, proclaiming "I don't
care if it ever happens," the
roving and understanding wife
- a role which does not make
great artistic demands upon
Hayley Mills. Her father, John
Mills, however, steals the show
with . his excellent portrayal of
a British work~er who 'tries so
hard to bek a man, especially in
front of his son.
The problems of the newlyweds
bring out _ the problems that al-
ready exist in Arthur's family.
The atmosphere that surrounds
the couple reminds one of a
British "Peyton Place" with
nosey neighbors and rumors fly-
ing, but serves as a vehicle for
humor.
"The Family Way" is a fine,
British treatment of a delicate
subject which probably would
have been ruined in Hollywood.

Third Rate. ..
By DAVID MELLINGER
One way of making moviegoers
feel good about a movie is the
Contrast Technique. This tech-
nique is employed in "The Famly
Way,"' in which the audience is
suddenly treated to a few min-
utes of pleasant feeling and emo-
tional interplay after a full hour
of boredom and unpleasantness.
"The Family Way" spends most
of its time exposing just how un-
happy a couple of young London
newlyweds can become if they
encounter e v e r y conceivable
cliche situation t h a t young
newlyweds might encounter. A
long, obnoxious wedding recept-
ion, the bed breaking during their
first night together while the
groom's father snores in the next
room, motorcycles revving down
in the street, travel agents run-
ning off with their honeymoon
funds it's a real third-rate
circus.
SNaturally, such tensions take
their toll on the newlyweds: they
lie sleeplessly all night, unable
to "take the plunge" and become
"really married."
In order to be at all worth-
while, this, spectacle has to reveal
something new about all those;
clinches, but it doesn't. This hour
of agony is there merely to lead
up to the half-hour of empathy
when old Arthur and Jenny fin..
ally take the tumble, after six
weeks of throbbing anticipation.
As the audience leaves its moan
of relief, so does everyone on the
screen, and all the complexities
which have developed around the
newlyweds' problem lightheart-
edly resolve themselves.
In the last few moments of the
film, the fine leads, who have
been expressing little other than
frustration throughout, get their
coportunity to shine. Hywel Ben-
nett, as Arthur, lashes out at his
boss who has insulted him, and
achieves undersetanding with his
weird but well-intentioned f a-
ther, played excellently by John
Mills.
Meanwhile their marital ful-
fillment enables Hayley Mills,
Arthur's wife, to act out the one
emotion that she really does skill-
fully - happiness.
However, It takes more than
this pleasing wind-up to tjustify
all the dull things in the movie.

poorly some kinds of popular art
form can stand the change of time.
Though interesting as an histori-
cal curiosity, "The Land of Smiles"
evokes in the world of 1967 only
a few half-hearted grins..
The operetta is divided into two
parts. The first scene is set in the
castle of the beautiful Countess
Lisa in Vienna. Though pursued
by the dashing cavalier Count
Gustav von Pottenstein, Lisa is
enamoured of the visiting Chinese
potentate Prince Sou Chong, and
so, in the next act, the scene
shifts to the prince's Peking home.
The only strong point of the
production was the excellent sing-
ing of tenor Giuseppe Di Stefano
in the role of Prince Sou Chong,
which provided the only authen-
tically moving note. Valorie Good-
all was lovely to look at as Lisa,
but her voice lacked the power to
fill vast Hill Auditorium. The
choreography and dancing were
for the most part unimaginative
and sloppily executed. Particular-
ly, in the first part of the per-
formance, the timing-of the danc-
ers seemed sadly off. The dance
routines themselves were unspeak-
ably dated, and one number, in-
volving scantily-clad girls goose-
stepping across the stage remind-
ed this reviewer uncomfortably
that it was just this sort of mawk-
ish romanticizing of the German
military past which led to such
unpleasant results in the years
following 1931.
Dagmar Koller as Mi, Sou'
Chong's sister, was sprightly and
vivacious, but her efforts could do
little to raise the sodden level of
the humor typified by 'duard1
Liners' grotesquely bad Chief Eu-
nuch.
The performance was confusing-
ly polyglot, with dialogue and
jokes in German, French, atro-
cious English and even, once, Rus-
sian. The result of this mixture
was to annihilate whatever unity
the performance might have had,
and the introduction of English
dialogue was ineffectual, embar-
rassing and condescending, besides
destroying whatevr eimpression of
the real 1931 article that might
have been conveyed.
"The Land of Smiles" may have
been fun for the over-50 and
those who really wanted to rem-
inisce about Old Vienna, but in
the age of Acid Rock, the sickly
sweetrtunes and the absurd over-
acting went over very sadly.
- - - - -

(Continued from Page 1)
rules. More specifically, when the
personal freedom of individuals is
at stake, it is clear that their
voice should be the definitive one
in formulating any restrictions on
that freedom.
As a matter of wise educational
policy, it is clear that the freest
environment and the one that be-
stows the most responsibility on
the individual, is the most condu-
cive to real learning and real per-
sonal development. The University
has endorsed precisely these goals
as its stated ambitions with re-
gard to education here. Can Dr.'
Cutler or anyone else seriously
claim, therefore, that a rule-mak-
ing system that denies this propo-
sition is compatible with the stat-
ed educational policy of this in-'
stitution?
It is perhaps true that not
everyone of these arguments is
completely convincing -in itself.
Taken together, however, they ap-
pear to us altogether persuasive.
At one time or another, in one
context or another, the University
has endorsed everyone of the above
propositions; yet there seems to
be a reluctance to convert noble
thoughts into tangible action.
Whatever the reason for this fail-
ing, the logic of the situation is
clear to us: We can only come to
the conclusion that students, and
students alone, must have the re-
sponsibility for making rules to
govern their personal lives.
The next question which Dr.+
Cutler's letter raises is the fol-
lowing: 'Can any group within
the University assume the respon-
sibility for an area of concern+
in the absence of Regental dele-1
gation of that responsibility to+
the group?"
Council members recognize that
the ultimate legal authority to reg-
ulate this University is vested in
the Board of Regents. Council's1
action is in no way an attempt to
usurp that legal authority. We
equestion; however, the just lim-
its of such power in the case of+
individual conduct rules. We are+
sincere in our belief that no gov-

erning body is acting morally
when it distributes the power to
regulate the personal freedom of
a group of people to any other
agent than those people them-
selves. It dismays us also that the
governing board of such a fine
educational institution as this one
should tolerate a situation with
such anti-educational overtones as
the present system of conduct
rules. On these grounds we ap-
peal to the Regents to comple-
ment the trend towards liberaliza-
tion of the substance of these reg-
ulations with a ruling which will
democratize the procedure of their
formulation., It was not SGC's
plan to defy the Regents when it
acted as it did two weeks ago. In-
stead, it is hoped that this firm
determination on our part to se-
cure for students the right to set
the limits of their own behavior
will make itself felt along all seg-
ments of the University, includ-
ing the Regents.
Dr. Cutler also suggests that
SGC has acted precipitously, and
in so doing undermined the work
of the Presidential Commission as
well as subverting in some sense
the whole "rational process of the
community." We will address our-
selves first to the question of
SGC's relationship with the com-
mission, then to the notion of
"community" that dominates
much discussion of University af-
fairs.
The commission is hailed by all
concerned parties, including SGC,
as a possible source of restructur-
ing of roles that this University
so desperately needs. SGC has in-
dicated its willingness to partici-
pate in the deliberations of the
commission, and to participate in
good faith. We are convinced from
all available evidence that the
commission will produce a valu-
able document, in the tradition of
the Knauss and Reed reports. We
are also concerned lest the com-
mission's report be greeted with
the same fate that befell its pred-
ecessors: file and forget. What-
ever the results of the commis-
sion's deliberations, however, SGC

insists on the essential principle
that students should possess the
minimal control over their en-
vironment implicit in the right to
make conduct rules. To us this
right is undeniable, and our pres-
ent action is not incompatible with
our support of the commission's
attempts to achieve a more equit-
able distribution of prerogatives in
the context of larger issues. SGC's
acceptance of the commission last
winter was founded on the un-
derstanding that participation in
these deliberations did not com-
promise its efforts in an area as
quint-essential as personal free-
dom of action.
One strand of thought that ap-
pears throughout Dr. Cutler's let-
ter, and is consistently present
in administration polemic, is the
notion of "the University commu-
nity." This is a noble concept,
but as a, description of present
realities it must be laid to rest as
the myth it is. In a real commu-
nity there is a unity .of purpose
among its constituent parts based
on their interrelatedness and in-
terdependence on an approximate-
ly coequal distribution of power.
In a real community the trust
generated by these conditions
makes unilateral decisions by one
segment an unknown occurrence.
Yet, there is a patently unequal
distribution of power on this cam-
pus. It is impossible, therefore,
to speak in this sense of a "Uni-
versity community" including stu-
dents. It was fallacious last year
to suggest that in the name of a
nonexistent "community" students
should cease their demands for
a real voice in University affairs;
it is outrageous this year to as-
Phone 434-0130
Entnne rn. ARPENTER RD
OPEN 7:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
Shown at 8.05 and 12:30

O0MINO SOON
TOM -
He rules
men like a
fighing ockl --cc reea rr aacraa/

4

rmrrmmim-

OF

2ND WEEK
NOW
SHOWING

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES S
FO. VL 3E
375 No. MAPLE RD. "76941300

sert that students must yield the
right to regulate their personal
lives in the name of the same
fable.
We are ready to accept the
notion that in some ideal face-
to-face educational community all
decisions, including those of stu-
dent conduct, could be decided on
some sort of joint basis, vary-
ing in exact nature from one sit-
uation to another. Such a com-
munity appears to be in the mak-
ing at the Residential College.'
We would suggest also that the
makings of a tenuous sort of com-
munity situation are implicit in
SGC's recent action. Nothing that
SGC did or said can be interpret-
ed as denying or removing the
invaluable participation of admin-

istrators or concerned faculty
members in the rule-making proc-
ess. On the contrary, their place
in that process, in an advisory
role, is encouraged by SGC. If
the faculty wants to take action
on its stated sentiments, and if
the administration believes what
it says, then both elements should
welcome this situation as an op-
portunity to support and assist
students in their first independ-
ent campus-wide attempt to create
a viable rules structure of their
own.
In short, SGC certainly does not
seek to destroy this institution,
but tp assist in its restructuring;
and SGC's action should be in-
terpreted as a call to community,
not confrontation.

4

mm

Showings' Daily
2:00-5:10
8:30

4

II

THK MIRISCH CORPORATION PRESENTS
JULIE ANDREWS"MAX VON SYDOWRICHARD HARRIS
in THE GEORGE ROY HIILWALTER MIRISCH PROIlUcTIN a"HAWAI"PANAVISION' COWRbvnre xe

_____ __ ._____ ___. ____ ,.J __ .e_ _ _..
. _
Iti ----------->- - - - -- i

UNION-LEAGUE

BRIDGE AND
DANCE LESSONS

e. . ____

+ TENORS & BASSES

4,

TONY FRANCIOSA
RAQUELWacLH
C2NEMASCOPE
COLOR by DELUXE

BEGINNING BRIDGE
$6.00 for the 12 hours
of lessons
ROOM 3G-UNION

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DeBrocas ..
Crowning ;t
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ALAN BATES }f
PIERRE BRASSEUR
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GENEVIEVE BUJOLD
ADOLFO CELT
FRANCOISE CHRISTOPHE
JULIEN GUIOMAR
MICHELINE PRESLE
MICHEL SERRAULT_
6F
ENDS WEDNESDAY
DIAL 8-6416

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MICH IGAN'S CHOI RS FOR
NON-MUSIC MAJORS-
ARTS CHORALE MICHIGAN SINGERS
WANT YOU!
Tuesday and Thursday-3:00-4:30
Aud. C Angell Hall
HURRY!
LAST 2 Dial
NO 2-6264
They're young... they're in love
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p ED
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Nov. 14
7-9 P M.

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FORMAL REGISTRATION: FISHBOWL
Sept. 25, 25, 27-11 A.M.-2 P.M

:r .r r rn..rr. r n. r wr i r. r.r" Irr

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"FASCINATING!"
-Det. Free Press
"WICKEDLY POTENT !"
-Flint Journal
"TREMENDOUS SCENES !"
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"PROVOCATIVE !"
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"VIRTUOSITY !"

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
b-...... . .": . ....,.: iQ;} .. v ."}" ... ?%......- -.:. .tt...:. ....... ............,.....{*}..~:...?,.:

THURSDAY
SEVEN ARTS PRODUCTIONS presentsl
hi -
IN COO A S E A P * R
IN COLOR| A SEVEN AR PICTURES RELEASE

The Daily Official. Bulletin Is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Blag. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.,
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
Thursday & Friday
THIS WEEK
THE BURMESE
HARP
Dir. Konchi Kawa, 1956
Japanese, subtitles.
Dilemma of a WW II
Japanese Prisoner-
Japan or peace?
Saturday & Sunday
"AR 1IM

Day Calendar
Flu 'hots: The first "flu shot" clinic
for this fall will be held at the Health
Service, Tues., Sept. 26, from 8-11:30
a.m. and 1-4:30 p.m. The charge is
$1.50 for students and spouse and $2 for
faculty, staff and spouses.
School of Music Concert-Students of
the Wind Instrument Department,
School of Music Recital Hail, 12:30
p.m.1
International Institution for Produc-
tion Engineering Research Conference
-"1967 Conference on Modern Manu-
facturing Technology": Morning ses--
(Continued on Page 8)
CINEMA 1
Presents
ROMAN
POLANSKI'S
(1966)

I

~ ~
DIAL 5-6290
"Speaks clearly and truly to a
whole new generation of long-
haired, soft-eyed kids who are be-
ginning to discover that a man is
not a man because he is tough, or
queer becausehe is tender."
-Newsweek Magazine

i
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in de Ghelderode's

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NOW
to
Oct. 1

IATRLI iI

Evenings at
8:00 P.M.
Matinee Sun.
at 2:30 P.M.

A provocative attempt
to out-Hitchcock
Hitchcock
SHORT: Chapter 2
FLASH GORDON

Returning! PRIOR To EXPO 67
7 Grant APA Hits

Coming! Oct. 10-15
(also Oct. 31-Nov. 5)

The BUUUINU UIUL ff, hS3 m ! I

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