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September 17, 1967 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-17

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TWO

TIIL MICHIGAN DAILY

TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

poetry and prose
'Review' Offers Equal Doses
Of Excellence, Heroic Effort

dance
Civic Ballet Offers a Place for Student Talent

i

By ELIZABETH WISSMAN
Judging from its first issue
(Fall, 1967), the "Ann Arbor Re-
view" is destined to make it big
with the "littles." The "littles"
are those unpretentious quarter-
lies and journals published in
offset, or on an old hand press.
They are almost anonymous and
always impecunious. But these
small publications can perform the
greatest acts of modern art pat-
ronage.
T say "can," because the poten-
tial for good is so often unexploit-
ed. It is not enough merely to
publish the work of unknown
authors. It is not sufficient to
play an intrepid David to the
gargantuan P o p u la r American
Culture. An un-known and un-
popular author is not, a priori, an
artist. The editors of the "Ann
Arbor Review" are aware of this,
and their. quarterly shows equal
amounts of heroic. effort and lit-
erary excellence.
The discretion and critical se-1
lection which has created the
Review is evident in the list of
contributors. The geographical
distribution alone is impressive-
authors from Tampa, Baltimore,!
and Buffalo, as well as Ann Ar-
bor. All this suggests communica-
tion-a network through which'
young authors may receive wide
critical exposure, and view the
techniques and devices being used
by others. This "cross-fertiliza-
tion" means greater variety and
exposure for the reader as well.
The "Ann Arbor Review" also
provides an index of other small

literary periodicals of a similar
nature.
The works represented are
mainly poetry, or criticism of new
poets. The imbalance is involun-
tary, I suspect. A poem is usually
shorter than a prose piece. But
also, there is something in the
fragmentation of this modern age
which is more amenable to poetry.
The brief impression, the unre-
solved conflict, the stasis of the
overpowered individual observor-
these 1967 themes inform the
poetry in the "Ann Arbor Review."
One of the finest sustained ef-
forts is "The Bridges" by Norman
Hoegberg, with its brilliantly con-
trolled irony:
Watch out for people jumping
from bridges, don't
try to stop them, mere hands
cannot seize
them, they have rocks in j
their pockets and
have prayed for a special
rock in their hearts
without which they will j
float and maybe walk
on the water like Jesus, but
even Jesus wasn't
Jesus, and the people will
pull them out and'
they will have todo it all
over again, but
Watch out especially for people
jumping from bridges
when you are walking
underneath them.
Other poets, such as Duane
Locke, prefer an organic form,
with briefer and more enigmatic
movement of images:

a lamp will carve away
the water
a curl comes home
and writes a rating across
all shadows
and switches on the mirror.
Even in the less assured and co-
hesive poems, there are fine lines
and single statements. For exam-
ple, a "discovery" of a Baltimore
Negro slum by Alfred Handy:
My father was a bum
well hell so am I
(see you in hell
daddy)
The prose in this debut issue of
the Review is far less even in its
quality than the poetry. The same
cultural symptoms which have
given an impetus to thehdiscon-
nected lyric are at work here. In
Richard Grossinger's essay "Items
of the Occult," there is an ex-
tremely dense and mystic form of
expression. In fact, the subject
of this essay is a neo-romantic
affirmation of the great and my-
sterious Self. Grossinger echoes
Wordsworth and an entire age
which was more noted for poetry
than prose:
accept the open universe
and seek in terms of the
vastness of your imagination.
David Madden provides the
longest selection in the Review. It
is a chapter from his new novel
"Cassandra Singing." Madden's
interest in film is evident through-
out the excerpt. Characters evoke
memories in the form of "movie
reels." Lone, the protaganist, .is
described as a "projectionist" as
he narrates the crystaline images
of his life. The chapter is filled
with sensuous fragments, like
separate stage settings. The char-
acters, too, speak in a "stagey"
dialogue, with auditory interrup-
tions and weighty caesuras. At
times, Madden is torn between his
loyalty to an image and to natural
sounding dialogue:
that pale kind of hate ain't
enough to make you want to
remember.
But Madden fastens upon the
seat of his own malaise. It is not
simply the word vs. the audio-
visual that tortures both Lone
and his creator. It is the perma-
nent vs. the transient. In a city
which destroys the familiar and a
technology which dissolves the
comfortable past. Lone struggles
to preserve something.

By JOANNE KING The Spring Concert is of a more
Students often complain that serious nature. The dance fare
the Ann Arbor community has offered varies greatly from clas-
made no place for its student sic like "Giselle" to original chor-
population, but the Ann Arbor eography with a more modern
Civic Ballet is a notable exception. thouch. Last spring the group per-
Students from the University as formed Choppiana, choreo-
well as from Eastern Michigan graphed by Mrs. Sylvia Hamer.
University actively participate in The Civic Ballet was the first
t h i s community organization. company of its kind to be organ-
Other members of the Civic Ballet ized in the state of Michigan or
come from throughout the Ann in a community the size of Ann
Arbor area. Arbor. It has grown steadily and
The Civic Ballet performs two now consists of more than thirty
concerts each year. Held at the dancing members, divided into
Ann Arbor High School Auditor- three corps - major, junior and
ium, they draw dance enthusiasts apprentice - with rank decided by
and students from all over the degree of skill. The apprentice
lower part of the state. group is usually of elementary
Each Christmas, children de- school age.
light at the Civic Ballet's produc- Many others work behind the
tion of "Mrs. Santa's Christmas scenes as stage hands, in publicty,
Party." The fantasy introduces selling tickets. Designing costumes
ballet at a level which children and sets and doing original work
can both understand and enjoy. in choreography.
7 i

The company was startedrin
1957 by Sylvia Hamer, now Art-
istic Director, in cooperation with
Margaret Townsley and Peggy
Himler.
The Civic Ballet has worked un-
der the direction of such renown-
ed teachers as Natchia Branitzka,
Alex Martin, Doris Herring and
Marjorie Hassard. The members
have performed in Detroit, East
Lansing, Jackson, Saginaw and
Plymouth.
Each summer. many of the Civic
Ballet's members (some on schol-
arships sponsored by the com-
pany) travel to Michigan State
University to attend the Cecchetti
Council Seminar, an international
dance organization which trains
teachers. There they dance under
the instruction of internationally
famed teachers and find a free
exchange of ideas.
The Civic Ballet company con-
sists of a corps of semi-profession-
al and professional dancers who
are constantly striving toward
professionalism in their work. In
order to achieve this quality, they
dance together at least once a
week during the September to
June season. Seven members of
the company have entered profes-
sional companies.
Dancers with training in clas-
sical ballet or supported adagio
are encouraged to audition for
membership in the company. Au-
ditions will begin at 8:00 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 20 at the Sylvia
Studio of Dance, 525 E. Liberty
St.

The eek T0 Come:
A Campus Calendar
SUNDAY, SEPT. 17 APA production of Michel del
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema Ghelderode's "Pantagleize" in the
Guild will present "Janus New Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Film Program, Part I" in the
Architecture Auditorium..8 WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 20
8:00 p.m. - The Professional
MONDAY, SEPT. 18 Theatre Program will present the
9:00 am. - The School of Den- APA production of Michel del
tistry will present a Symposiumon Ghelderode's "Pantagleize" in the
"T h e Progress o f Dentistry Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
through Research" in the Rack- THURSDAY, SEPT.21
ham Amphitheatre. ° 7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
8:30 p.m. - The School of Guild will present "Janus New
Music will present a concert by Film Program, Part II" in the
organist Robert Glasgow in Hill Architecture Auditorium.1

.
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I

Auditorium. 8:00 p.m. - Profession Theatre
TUESDAY, SEPT. 19 Program will present the APA
7:30 p.m. - The American As- production of Michel del Ghel-
sociation of University Women derode's "Pantagleize" in the Ly-
will present a lecture by Dr. Wal- dia Mendelssohn Theatre.
ter Spink on "Indian Sculpture . .8:30 p.m. - The School of
and Architecture" in the Rack- Music will present a Sonata Re-
ham Amphitheatre. cital in Rackham Lecture Hall.
8:00 p.m. - The Professional FRIDAY, SEPT. 22
Theatre Program will present the 7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present "Janus Newt
Film Program, Part II" in the1
Architecture Auditorium.
A cro s 8:00 p.m. -Professional Theatre
Program will present the APA pro-
duction of Michel del Ghelderode's
"Pantagleize" in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 23
1:30 p.m. - Football: Michigan
The University's radio astrono- vs. Duke in Michigan Stadium.
my observatory will be open to the 7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
public today from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Guild will present "Janus New
Staff members wil be on hand to Film Program, Part II" in the
describe the operation of the 85- Architecture Auditorium.
foot diameter telescope and ex- 8:00 p.m. -Professional Theatre
plain how it receives natural radio Program will present the APA pro-
waves from the sun, moon, planets, duction of Michel del Ghelderode's
exploding galaxies, and quasars. "Pantagleize" in Lydia Mendels-
The observatory is located at sohn Theatre.
10280 North Territorial Road, y5-
miles north of Ann Arbor and 10 NATIONAL OENERAL
miles west of U.S. 23. COMING FOX EASTERN TREA
SEPT. 20th FOX VII
Geraldine T. School, associate 375 No. MAPLEI
professor of special education, has
been named special consultant to
a new committee to advise on the
development of evaluative instru- Wene
ments specifically applicable to.
residential schools for the blind.
*:* *
A Midwest "air tour" for na-'
tional education writers will visit
the University Nov. 15-16. Con-
ducted by the Education Writers
Association and the National As- THE NIRWR CRM
sociation of State Universities and JULIE ANDREWS"MAX VON
Land Grant Colleges, the tour willin THE GEORGE ROY HILL WALTER NIRISH PRODUCTION

To preserve it, to preserve
Knoxville, the house, Cassie,
in his own mind and in the
mind of a stranger
It is a structure which Mr. Mad-
den is seeking, but the old prose
order can not contain the chaos
that he envisions.
Madden does not entirely suc-
ceed in his search. But it is for-
tunate both for him and for us,
that there are publications which
will allow this creative hunt to
continue.

I

I

-Stuart Abbey
DANCERS OF THE MAJOR CORPS of the Ann Arbor Civic
Ballet company perform "Choppiana" in last year's Spring
Concert held at Ann Arbor High School.

r7 - -__

1

3rd and
FINAL WEEK

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