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September 15, 1967 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-15

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15,1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

I

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

LBJ

Advocates

Action

To Combat

Urban Crime!

Draft Board
Examiners
Resign Posts
Officials Say State
Shows Favoritism
To Rich Applicants

ATTENDANCE DWINDLING:
Lindsay Predicts No Quick End
To N.Y.C. Teachers' Walkout

New York ()P)-Republican May- difficult situation may last for
or John V. Lindsay said yesterday some time. At the moment it does
that a four-day strike of teachers Inot look very optimistic," Donovan

Challenges
Police; Blasts
Rot Leaders
Kansas City Speech
Urges Support For
Violence Legislation
KANSAS CITY ()-Leaders of
violence in the nation's cities were
lashed by President Johnson yes-
terday as wretched, vulgar men
who posed as spokesmen for the
underprivileged and capitalized on
the real grievances of the suffering
people.
Johnson flew to Kansas City to
speak to a meeting of several hun-
dred police chiefs and challenge
them to redeem the faith of the
poor in the law. He also worked
in a brief, private meeting with
former President Harry S. Tru-
man.
"What America needs is not
more hand-wringing about crime
in the streets, Johnson told the
International Association of Chiefs
of Police. "America needs a policy
for action against crime in the
streets."
The police chiefs broke into the
President's speech with hearty ap-
plause when, he asserted, "Much
can explain - but nothing can
justify - the riots of 1967."
Johnson declared one way to
redeem faith in the law among the
urban poor is to "make certain
that law enforcement is fair and
effective-that protection is af-
forded every family, no matter
where they live-that justice is
swift and blind to religion, color
and status."
The president urged the police
chiefs to support congressional ac-
tion on the administration's pro-
posed Safe Streets and Crime Con-
trol Act. He described the measure
as a tool for crime research, rais-
ing police salaries and providing
better training.
Johnson emphasized the federal
government is not trying to take
over local law enforcement func-
tions, explaining: "Officials in
Washington cannot patrol a neigh-
borhood in the far West, stop a
burglary in the South or prevent
a riot in a great metropolis."
Passage of a federal statute con-
trolling sale of guns also was sup-
ported by the President, who said
its adoption "would plug up one
more loophole to save your life,
or mine, or the life of some in-
nocent child down the street."
Stressing that respect for law
begins at home, Johnson stated,
"Your children learn it from you
- by example.
That means every time you
water the lawn when there is an
ordnance against it, they learn
the wrong lesson about respect
for law and order.
Evangelist Billy Graham, who is
conducting a religious crusade
nere, met the President at Munici-
pal Auditorium when Johnson ar-
rived. After his brief talk, John-
son drove to nearby Independence
and had 'a 10-minute private talk
with the 83-year-old Truman.

in New York City's 1.1-million-
pupil public school system does not

COLDWATER, Mich. (M) - Two at the moment "appear to be ripe
members of a county draftboard for settlement."
have resigned, charging that po- "There is no clear disposition to
litical pressure led state Selective settle within the next few hours,
Service officials to postpone seven but that could change," added
times the induction of four youths Lindsay, as strike leader Albert
from influential families. Shanker risked jail in continued
Frank Beaudin, board chairman defiance of back-to-work man-
for more than 15 years, and An- dates from the courts.
drew Henry, a six-year board School Supt. Bernard E. Dono-
member who was secretary, re- van sounded even more gloomy in
signed from the Branch County the face of the continuing strike
Draft Board in Southern Lower by Shanker's 49,000-member AFL-
Michigan. CIO United Federation of Teach-
None of the names of youths ers.

said.
Donovan kept the city's 900
schools open, but attendance has
gradualy dwindled to less than
400.000. Few of these pupils re-
ceived any formal classroom in-
struction.
More than 40,000 of the city's
55,000 teachers struck Monday on
the opening day of the new term in
a demand for higher wages and
greater classroom control.
The walkout was launched in
defiance of a State Supreme Court
antistrike order. The legal ban
was based on a new state law pro-
hibiting any union of public em-
ployes from striking.

I

-Associated Press
PRESIDENT LYNDON JOHNSON arriving in Kansas City Municipal airport yesterday. The President
adressed the convention of the International Association of Police Chiefs in Kansas City and called
for increase anti-violence legislation. After his speech, Johnson met briefly with former President
Truman.
HAIPHONG SAFE:
MeNamara's Ban on Attacks
'Of Viet Ports Upheld.b US

involved were made public.
Col. Arthur A. Holmes, state
Selective Service director, said he
made the postponement decision
in at least one of the cases. "I
didn't note any political pressure,"
he said.
Beaudin's letter of resignation
Wednesday said "four youths ofl
this county were prematurely in-
ducted" because Michigan Selec-
tive Service headquarters had
postponed the induction of four
others.
The state action came "over
and above the legal votes of the
local board and the state appeal
board," Beaudin said.
Henry, who resigned yesterday,
said, "A special dispensation, so
to speak, for anyone, makes it
tough for us and kind of embar-
rassing. We do a lot of investigat-
ing before we make any decisions.
"In my opinion, the state head-
quarters had pressure applied
from Washington-a lawyer writes
a congressman who writes to Her-
shey and he writes the state
board," Henry said.
Brig. Gen. Lewis Hershey, head"
of the United States Selective
Service System, wrote to Holmes,
saying Rep, Edward Hutchinson
(R-Mich.) had asked why no de-
ferment had been granted in one
of the cases.
Holmes said, however, that his
decision had been made before he

Romney Silent on Formal
Statement of Candidacy

NEW YORK (P)-Gov. George
Romney has given no indication
to his aides of when, or if, he will
announce his candidacy for the
Republican presidential nomina-
tion, a Romney source said yes-
terday.
The governor's dinner meeting
last night with New York Gov.
Nelson A. Rockefeller, one of his
chief supporters, was considered
important in charting Romney's
future course.
The Romney source acknowl-
edged that the governor has been
urged by some of his advisers to
speed up the formal announce-
ment of his candidacy.
On the other hand, the source
contended there was nothing new
in this, that various parties had
been urging Romney to throw his
hat into the ring as early as last
June.
Asked yesterday whether it was
true that he was under pressure
to speed up his timing, Romney
said he would not talk public poli-
tics on or off the record.
And he kept this vow of political

Romney spent Wednesday nightt
and much of yesterday inspectingj
programs in Rochester, N.Y., a.
city struck by Negro rioting in
1965. He praised the progress being1
made by business and local groups.
He contended that one of the
main reasons for his extended trip
is to study whether U.S. priorities
are in proper balance, such as
whether Vietnam is given emphasis
at the expense of programs aimed
at solving problems in the Negro
slums across the country.
"If we don't deal with these
problems within, we'll never deal
effectively with the problems with-
out," Romney said.
While touring an Urban League
project in Rochester, the governor
was approached by some young-
sters asking his help to get resto-
ration of the federal funds for the
league's work.
Venturing as close to the polit-
ical scene as he ever gets, Romney
told the youngsters, "In my pres-
ent capacity, I don't have any
authority to do anything about
it."'

It may very well be that this

The law provides fines of up
to $10,000 a day against any such
striking union, and contempt pen-
alties of up to thirty days in jail
against union leaders.
A hearing on contempt charges
against Shanker and other UFT
leaders was postponed for 24
hours by State Supreme Court
Justice Emilio Nunez.
The union said that at this stage
of the deadlock wages are less vital
than UFT demands for smaller
classes and greater initiative by
teachers in ejecting disruptive
pupils from their classrooms.
Negro Opposition
The latter demand has led to
considerable Negro oposition to
the strike, on grounds it could
prove a racial weapon in the hands
of white teachers with Negro
pupils.
"The ghetto schools are angry,"
Lindsay told a news conference.
In, addition, John T. Marsh, a
union chapter chairman, declared :
"There is a feeling in all the Negro
communities that the Negro chil-
dren are being harmed by the
strike."
Six Negro youths with antistrike
placards picketed UFT headquar-
ters protesting among other things
the disruptive child clause in the
union's proposed contract.
However, a number of Negro
leaders have voiced support for
the striking teachers.
Other Schools
In Broward County, Florida, a
contract agreement was reached
sending some 90,000 pupils back
to school. A new walkout devel-
oped in Yakima, Wash., where an
11-man faculty of a Catholic high
school failed to show up for work.
Michigan's acting governor Wil-
liam Milliken called for state me-
diators to meet today in a con-
tinued effort to find a way to
finance the pay demands of De-
troit's 11,000 teachers.
In Houston, Texas, parents con-
tinued to hold "freedom schools"
in churches in answer to a teacher
boycott there. Similar schools
were planned in Providence, R.I.

By BOB HORTON
-Associated Press News Analyst
WASHINGTON-The Pentagon,
in its eagerness to show that Sec-
retary of Defense Robert S. McNa-
mara was not overruled in recent
war decisions, has given North
Vietnam official word that port
facilities of Haiphong are safe
from attack at present.
This unusual tipoff on admin-
istration thinking followed this
week's U.S. raids on the Commu-
nist port of Cam Pha and near
Haiphong's vital docking facilities.
McNamara only days before the
briefed Congress rather elaborately
on why North Vietnam's ports
need not be struck, saying the
Communists would find other ways
to get arms southward.
When Cam Pha was hit Monday
and Haiphong Tuesday, the im-
mediate assumption arose that
President Johnson is paying less
attention to McNamara at the
moment while favoring the hard-
line approach of the Joint Chiefs
of Staff, who wanted these targets
hit.
Adding to this belief, informa-
tion drawn from communiques,
administration statements and in-
terviews showed that at least 20
new, major targets have been au-
thorized for attack by the admin-
istration since February.
The White House press office
felt compelled for the second time'
in two weeks to say there was
"general agreement" among the
top civilian and military heads
over the conduct of the war.

The Pentagon followed up with
its statement, mainly responding
to a story that U.S. planes could
attack Haiphong port provided
Soviet ships weren't damaged.
Said Phil G.,, Goulding, chief
Pentagon spokesman: "Published
reports are untrue that approval
has been given to bomb the port
of Haiphong and its environs."
This declaration was unusual
since the administration rarely has
given North Vietnam any indica-
tion a particular military move
might or might not take place.
In addition to the denial, the'
Pentagon statement also drew a
fine distinction to show that, after
all, McNamara's opposition to
striking the docks was not over-
ridden.
The Haiphong raid was aimed
at bridges, a rail yard and supply
warehouse, it said. These were hit
in an attempt to create a massive
port problem and thus slow down
the importing of Communist war
supplies.
Speculation that McNamara's
views are becoming less decisive
in high administration war plan-
ning was based mainly on the Cam
Pha attack coming so soon after
he downgraded the value of port
raids.
McNamara told the Senate pre-
paredness subcommittee in a
lengthy statement Aug. 25 that no
decision to close Haiphong, Hon
Gai and Cam Pha "by whatever

means" would prevent "the move-
ment in and through North Viet-
nam of the essentials to continue
their present level of military ac-
tivity in South Vietnam."
There is reason to believe Mc-
Namara has had reservation about
expanding the bombing to new
targets the past six months.
The intensification of the bomb-
ing has come in two phases.
On Feb. 22 the administration
approved first-time attacks on
North Vietnam's Thai Nguyen
steel mill and three jet airfields,
plus other targets. Because of bad
weather the first of these was not
hit until March and most were
attacked in late April.
A second new package of previ-
ously immune installations was
opened up to the military in early
August at a time when Rep. Ger-
ald R. Ford (R-Mich), and mem-
bers of the Senate preparedness
subcommittee w e r e criticizing
bombing restraints. Targets near
the Chinese border and deep in
Hanoi were struck.
He has said flatly that bombing
won't drive Hanoi to bargaining.
With the windup of the Senate
group's hearings on the air war
McNamara had consistenly over-
ruled military judgement on tar-
geting.
The report was issued Aug. 31
-and followed in a few days by
a new cycle of bombing of here-
tofore untouched targets includ-
ing Cam Pha.

received the letter. silence on arrival in New York
Holmes said the most recent City. After giving some praise to
case involved a farm youth who California Gov. Ronald Reagan
said he needed time to harvest a during a brief airport news con-
crop. ference, Romney was asked,. "Do
The local board had granted a you envision a Romney-Reagan
30-day postponement. Holmes said ticket?"
he extended this to December "I don't vision anything now
when members of the Agricultural but urban problems," retorted
Stabilization Boar din Coldwater, Romney.
at the inquiry, said the boy need- He told newsmen traveling with
ed more time. him on his 19-day nationwide
Henry said three other youths tour, "I think this trip thus far
each had received two postpone- has been very profitable as far as
ments, d e s p i t e local rulings I am concerned. I've gotten a lot
against them. out of it."
CANTERBURY HOUSE

ii=

iQ

a

/111el

SABBATH SERVICE
Friday at 7:15 P.M.
Oneg .Shabbat Program
Part Two of a Series
A HILLEL DIRECTOR LOOKS
AT ISRAEL AFTER...
A program of dramatic and strikingly beautiful
color slides taken after' the six day war in the Mid-
dIe East.

FRI., SAT., SUN.
Sept. 15, 16, 17
8:00 P.M.
with the
WEIRD SISTERS
Bert Hornback
Margaret Albright
Peter Ferran
Roger Staples
LarrydGlover
Wendy Roe
Tom Garboty
Perry Innes
Reg. Malcomson
Frithjof Bergmann
Robert Oneal
Donald Hall
and more
330 MAYNARD

1429 HILL S

JOHN PLANER, Cantor
Choir directed by STEVEN OVITSKY
JOAN SPITZER, Organist

T.

AL

LL WELCOME

II

I

i _

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
KINSHASA, the Congo-African
leaders heard United Nations
Secretary-General U Thant plead
for international cooperation yes-
terday. Then they voted support
for the Congo against its rebel
mercenaries, for Egypt against Is-
rael and for Nigeria against seces-
sionist Biafra.
None of the resolutions on the
Congo, Egypt and Nigeria men-
tioned possible military or other
specific forms of aid.
OTTAWA - Foreign Secretary
Paunl Martin said yesterday that
North Vietnamese authorities have
expressed interest in contacts with
Canada over ways to bring about

talks to end the Vietnamese war
At the same time, Martin cau-
tioned that at present he sees
"not much chance" of breaking
the deadlock preventing peac
negotiations.
WASHINGTON - American
Telephone & Telegraph Co. won
from the Federal Communication,
Commission yesterday a $20 mil-
lion temporary reprieve in th
$120 million telephone rate cut i
is being required to make, and ax
added profit of about $12 million
a year.
But in a 7-0 decision the Com
mission stood firm in its July
decision that Bell System profit
should be in the 7 to 71/2 per cen
range.

r.
s
:e
n
n
is
it
n

TONIGHT at
'T* ARK
1421 Hill Street
The John Miller Jazz Trio
Three from the U. of M. Band
SATURDAY, SEPT. 16
The Big Sandy Boys
The Best BLUEGRASS in Michigan

"A Reading"

,

ii

I

611111K UILD
PRESENTS:
JANUS FILMS PRESENTS THE ARCTURUS COLLECTION
DIRECT FROM NEW YORK'S PHILHARMONIC HALL
a collection of brilliant short films
by the directors of the 60's (& 70's)

AI

i

I

L E22

'!1

i

...

cl

FRIDAY
SATURDAY

Millel 4ctieitie
SABBATH SERVICES
Traditional 6:00 P.M.
Conservative 7:15 P.M.
rSERVICES
Traditional 9:00 A.M.
(1505 Brooklyn St.)
Conservative 9:30 A.M. (At Hillel)
TALMUD CLASS 6:00 P.M.

n
CINEMA II
Is
it Presents
SIMONE YVES
SIGNORE MONTAN D
in
THE SLEEPING
CAR MURDER
(1965)
"A top-notch thriller from France! It races and

Noe ina'

PROGRAM NO. 1

Enter Hamlet Fred Mogubgub, U.S.A.
Renaissance Walerian Borowczyk, Poland
Les Mistons '67 Francois Truffaut, France
Running, Jumping, and Standing Still Film
Richard Lester, England
Two Castles Bruno Bozzetto, Italy
The Fat and the Lean Roman Polanski, Poland
Corrida Interdite Denys Colomb de Daunant, France

HILL AUDITORIUM

11

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