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September 15, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

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PAGE TWO ~~~~~~~~~lt 1 i 1Tf!1TJAN 5 Z.. I ~BA~r3.±r P t1A .4

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1967

MUSIC 'Mao Calls on Army
Quality Budget Records Booming To Fight Against Liu

TONIGHT
at 7 &9P.M.

c ' '

By R. A. PERRY
For the record collector, this
past summer provided both treas-
ures and tragedies. Major record
companies raised the prices on
monaural discs to that of stereo
and thus drew nearer to the policy,
already in effect in England, to
)ress only stereo editions.
This decision is unfortunate not
only because many recordings, for
Instance vocal or piano recitals, do
not require stereo, but also because
recording engineers have not yet"
truly learned how to maintain in-
strumental definition in a spread
two-channel system.
Ironically, such a price hike and'
the ensuing commitment to stereo
will probbaly drive the wise buyer
to examine more closely the ever
more numerous offerings in the.
"budget" field. Music lovers (as
apposed to sound enthusiasts) will
not only discover a rich catalog
but will also reaffirm that mono is
I boon, not a detriment.
Five years ago, $1.98 could only
buy John Schmendrik conducting
the ElrPaso Strings in favorite
tunes from Rachmanlnof. Today,
you can purchase similarly inex-
pensive classic performances by
Beecham, Casals, G ie se k ing,
Schwarzkopf, andFischer-Dleskau.
Seraphim l4as just reissued Tos-
canini's early performances of
Beethoven symphonies. Victor is
releasing nearly their entire Tos-
canini catalog on their low-priced
Victrola label.
Thus the record industry pre-
sents the strange phenomenon of
as business marketing its own low-
er-priced, often more desireable,
competition.
A review of Columbia's summer,
releases well illustrates the situ-E
ation. E. Power Biggs is featured on
a ful-priced disc (ML 6255) play-
ng historic organs of Switzerland,
including the oldest playable organ
in the world at Sion. A must for
students of the organ, Biggs' pro-
gram offers a fascinating short his-
tory of early esoteric organ music.
On their bargain Odyssey label,
however, Columbia has brought
out two equally valuable organ re-
cordings. On one (32160067) the
Compenius organ in Denmark is
featured. Francis Chapelet plays
the music of Scheidt, Dowling and
Sweelinck. Jan Sweelinck, the 16th'
century Dutch organist who in-'
fluenced Bach, wrote especially
lovely and lively works and there'
Is no other comparable recording
at this price. The sound is full
and clear.
On a two-record Odyssey set
(32260003) Albert Schweitzer of-
fers his pensive and deeply-felt

rendition of various Bach organ of which reveal Nielson's early ex-
works. Both the recording and the perience in military bands, give
jerformance style do not meet to- this record (ML 6404) its gay fas-
day's standards of technical clari- cination.
ty, but then perhaps one was not Any contemporary music en-
intended to see into the farthest thusiast with a sense of humor
corners of Gothic spires. Both should delight in Columbia's re-
Odyssey records are remarkable cent "The World of Charles Ives."

i argains'
Another Odyssey release offers
the first and fourth piano concerti
of Beethoven played by Robert
Casadesus with the Concertgebouw
of Amsterdam under Van Beinum.
In recent months both Carl

(ML 6415) Ives, who may be our
modern Haydn, has been much
quoted for his line "Use your ears
like a man," but it does not take
great effort to detect all of the
Americana weaving in and out of
his music. Columbia's new release

Stravinsky, like Picasso, is an
artist so unquestionably established
end-groove distortion.
Stravinsky's "Mass," however, is
I serene, unornimented choral
work specifically intended for and
suitable to the church surround-
ings. Under Stravinsky's baton the
Gregg Smith Singers sound more
thin then pure, but nevertheless
create a moving performance. The
recording is marred, however, by
on Parnassus that his works are
nore often classified than experi-
enced, Regardless of the "period"
to which his 1948 "Mass," his 1952
"Cantata" or his 1954 "In Memo-
rium Dylan Thomas" (ML 6392)
belong, it is the musical experience
that must supercede historical fact.
Dylan Thomas's "Do not go gently
into that good night" gains nothing
and loses much in Stravinsky's
musical setting.

Nielson and Charles Ives have been has Ormandy performing "Three
receiving a flurry of attention. Places in New England," Bern-
Seizing the moment, Columbia has stein leading "Washington's Birth-
released a disc on which Eugene day," and Stokowski trying to hold
Ormandy leads the Philadelphia in line the raucas "RobertBrown-
Orchestra in a blatant and unin- ing Overture." All three perform-
spired performance of Nielson's ances wil reveal the rich complex-
First Symphony. Three previously ity and endless surprise of Ives'
unavailable Overtures, however, all music.

-cinema
Incestuous Insistence Horribly
Horiyn:Sa oe Sister'

TOKYO MP)-Red China's offi-
cial People's Daily declared yes-
terday it would be necessary 'to
move a mighty army into action"
to gain victory over President Liu
Shao-chi and his supporters.
The newspaper did not say
whether this meant military force
against the supporters of Liu, who
have held out in most parts of
the country through more than a
year of the power struggle.
Probably, it meant an army of
supporters of party Chairman Mao
Tse-tung, for the newspaper em-
phasized the need to "vigorously
promote the revolutionary great
alliance."
Army Split
The loyalty of the army is in
doubt. The army in various parts
of the country is reported split
over whether to support Mao, his
foes or to remain neutral.
Earlier in the day, Shanghai
r a d i o in a Chinese-language
broadcast designed for home con-
sumption demanded an end to
what it called spreading anarchy
in the army.
This indicated serious defection
in Shanghai, the largest port in
Red China, where the Maoists
claim to be in control.
Defense Minister Lin Piao, as
Mao'sheir apparent, is in theo-
retical control of the army, but
he has had his troubles with mil-
itary leaders, even in Peking.
Some military leaders were miss-
ing when Peking celebrated the
army's 40th anniversary Aug. 1.
Radio Peking announced the start
of a campaign Aug. 24 to wipe
out the 'bourgeois military line"
in the army staff.
Little Control
By official count, Mao's revolu-
tionary alliance, a combine of
army men, party workers and lo-
cal Maoists revolutionaries, have
claimed absolute control in only
four of China's 26 provinces and
autonomous regions. These are
Heilungkiang in M a n c h u r i a,
Shantung in east China, Shansi
in the north and Kweichow in the

west. This indicates a reluctance
on the part of army leaders to
take sides in the power struggle.
Partial control is claimed in eight
other provinces.
Radio Peking broadcast the
People's Daily article, which call-
ed for mass struggle "against the
handful of persons in authority,
headed by China's Khrushchev
Liu, taking the capitalist road."
"In order to achieve these ob-
jectives," the article went on, "it
is necessary to organize millions
upon millions of the masses and
to move a mighty army into action
to bring about and strengthen the
revolutionary great alliance."
The newspaper conceded splits
exist among Maoists themselves
and called on the factions to
patch up their differences. It
blamed the splits on Liu's follow-
ers who have "hood-winked, mis-
led and manipulated" Maoists or-
ganizations.
From Hong Kong came reports
that army units loyal to Mao wera
trying to get trains running again
after serious disruptions caused by
fighting between rival factions.

"Delightful film! . . . hearty laughs,
chuckles. . . . Anna Magnani gives
comedy portrayal!"--N.Y. Daily News

m

DIAL
8-64 16
many good
a beautiful

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SYLVA KOSCINAIVIRNA LISITIANNA MAGNANI I NINO MANFREDI
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By DANIEL OKRENT
It is bad enough when a pro-
ducer advertises his film as being
"in the great Swedish film tra-
dition" or "from the makers of
'Dear John'," and we are 'then
offered a tasteless strip show of
badly executed eroticism. It is far
worse, however, when they use
"MY SISTER, MY LOVE"
Cast
Bibi Andersson ...... Charlotte
Per Oscarson .......... Jacob
JarI Kulle ........ Carl Ulrik
the same come on and don't even
supply the item that was prom-
ised so circuitously in the ads.
This, however, is not the only
crime that is committed in "My
Sister, My Love," an incredibly
bad product now showing at the
Vth Forum. Flipping up and down
in an appalling flow of idiosyn-
crat cliches-in execution as well
as content-the film finally re-
deems itself only by coming to
a hurried finish. And even the fin-
ish is entirely ludicrous and un-
necessary.
Aptly and invitingly titled, "My
Sister, My Love" does indeed deal
with an entirely complete Incest-
uous relationship. Now, there is
nothing wrong in presenting a
topic such as incest-in fact, only

recently have major producers
dared to deal in themes such as
this-but this film is carried to a
nauseating extreme. Not only do
brother-sister leads Per Oscarson
and Bibi Andersson carry on their
hayloft affair, but the only lady
on a nearby farm had suffered a
mongoloid child from an interlude
with her father, an aristocratic
friend of the family is in con-
stant unnamed rendezvous with his
daughter, and Miss Andersson's
husband (her incest was, to go
the others one better, adulterous)
suffers from a sickening feeble
transvestism (he constantly
dreams that he is bearing his
wife's baby).
So we are handed this meatless
casserole of perversion, intermit-
tently spiced with some of the
most yawn-provoking love scenes
yet to hit the screen. Indeed, Play-
boy refers to it as "one of the
most graphically erotic films ever
made for public showing," but the
graphics are incredibly dull. We
are offered an entirely superfluous
scene of Oscarson and two female
friends-he cheats on his sister
to boot, and this bothers her im-
mensely, so we have some mental3
sadism thrown in-rolling around
in bed, all totally nude, all totallyI
exposed and all totally disgusting.
On the right of the bed a 200-
-

pound female hulk snores robust-
ly while Oscarson and a more
comely companion frolic to the left
of the hulk.
This scene, as almost all others,
is totally unrelated to the chief
line of plot. Those scenes that do
pertain to the story are repeated
incessantly, just in case the viewer
doesn't get the point. Miss Anders-
son worries, that her baby will be
as deformed as the full grown
mongoloid son of the lady next
door, so the giant idiot is con-
stantly paraded across the screen,
drooling and grunting quite con-
vincingly (the fellow who plays
this role-unidentified in the cred-
its-is by far the best actor in the
production). The viewer can only
take so much.

NATIONAL ORNERAL CORPORATION __

COMING
SEPT. 20th

NATIONAGNEAL CO.POATIO
FOX EASTERN THEATRES
FOX VILLaGE
35 No. MAPLE RD. "769.1300

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-Boston Record American
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and
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NOW SHOWING

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JLLIE ANDREWS"MAX VON SYDOW RICHARD HARRIS
n THE GEORGE ROY HILL WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION of"HAWAII"PANAVISION' COLORby DeLe

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r. a, l

In an effort to minimize the
time required to make appoint-
ments with counselors for winter
term elections and to help reduce
the lines involved, the literary
college Freshman Sophomore
counseling office is instituting a
new procedure for making these
appointments.
Students will be asked to make
appointments according to their
counselor. The counselors have
been divided into three groups,
each, group being given a separate
period of three days during which
their students may make appoint-
ments. The first of these periods
starts Sept. 18 and the last one

ends Sept. 28. At the start of each
three-day period the full range
of dates for appointments with the
counselors will be available.
Sophomores will receive ap-
pointments with their counselors
starting Oct. 2 and Freshmen will
receive appointments starting Oct.
30 (after mid-term grades).
* * *
The University's radio-astron-
omy observatory will be open to
the public on Sunday, Septem-
ber 17, for the last time this year.
The observatory is located at'
10280 North Territorial Road,
northwest of Ann Arbor. Visting
hours are from 2 to 4:30 p.m.

3rd and (~TTTT7T
FINAL WEEK
"An amusing poignant film! It is beautifully
excellent performance." -- N. Y . Times
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