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September 08, 1967 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-08

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PAGE TWO-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1967

PAGR TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,1967

1 0 1" '0 04

'MEDIOCRE ACTING':
'Naked Runner' No Challenge.
Tio elevision-Oriented Taste

Plant Employe Walkout
Stops U' Construction

Panel Recommends New Bank
To Finance Educational Costs

By PAUL GINGRAS
Frank Sinatra's "Naked Run-
ner" is custom made for the large
inner-city movie house late shows;
people go there with the intention
of sleeping.
In this film we have yet another
example of mediocre acting aided
by raindom directing turning a
poor script into an utter waste of
time. This movie is certainly not
worth missing "I Spy" for; "The
Monkeys" maybe.
Although a synopsis of the plot
might give the false impression
of suspense and cleverness, fear
not; there is absolutely nothing in
"Naked" which will challenge
one's television-conditioned taste
and expectations. Also, for that
matter, there is nothing which will
entertain the viewer or justify his
expenditure, of a buck-and-a-
half.
An agent with vital information
has escaped from the British and
is in the hands of the Russians.
He must be killed "at any cost."
'What is required is a man who is
unknown, not a regular agent.
Who shall we. get? Frank Sinatra
of course. You see Frank has deep
seated guilt feelings about a cer-

tain incident of his war career.;
As is very explicitly stated by one
of the characters, presumably a
psychologist, we have here a prob-
lem of "motivation and response."
Ah hah! This is the "key to Sam+
Laker," as stated in the advertise-
ments. Now we get to see how
they "wound it up good and tight
. and then turned him loose."
Unfortunately, all that is wound
up good and tight is the viewer's
patience.
Through what is intended to
appear as a skilful use of Laker's
guilt against himself, he is
transformed from a mild-manner-
ed furniture designer into an un-
dercover agent with psychotic
tendencies.
He has been "arrested" in Ger-
many by British agents posing as
Germans and has been led to be-
lieve that his son, who has been
kidnapped by the "Germans,' will
be killed if he does not kill Zen-
gler" for the Germans - er Brit-
ish, that is. At about this point
the viewer begins to try to re-
member why they couldn'ttuse a
regular agent, and is frustrated.
More complications arise. The
British agents can't get the room
opposite the room in which the
prey is to spend the night. And
so on. Anyway, it becomes neces-

sary to tell Sinatra that his son
has= been killed by his kidnap-
pers. Just like the psychologist
said, Sinatra has become "a mar-
ienette" and his revenge is dir-
ected against the man he thinks
killed his boy, but really didn't.
If that isn't enough, the supposed
killer isn't going to be in the car1
that Sinatra is going to be firing
at, it is going to be the agent who
the British wanted Sinatra to kill
in the first place.
If this seems confusing, in the
film it is much clearer due to the
lullaby pacing of the action.
A few good bits and pieces of
photography haphazardly inserted
fail to establish the proper mood
and. become unsubtle gimmicks.
In fact, the high point of the en-
tire film is a scene in which Sin-
atra is taken to the woods by a
British agent posing as a Ger-
man agent. Sinatra is ordered!
out of the car and faces the cam-
era. The pseudo-German raises
his pistol and cocks it audibly.
The sweat pours down Frank's
face. Just as we are reminding
ourselves that this is Sinatra's
picture and he can't be killed
yet, the German, David Nesbit,
lowers his gun and says: "Not
this time." With this as the high
point, need one say more?

(Continued from Page 1)
The University has been con-
tending that the delay in the PA
379 ease, which is being handled
currently, is the reason for the
lengthy wait. However, a spokes-
man for the board said yesterday
the SLMB is not specifically wait-s
ing for any decision on that case.
In a statement distributed to
the workers at an emergency
meeting called Wednesday after-
noon to avert the walk-out, Uni-
versity attorney William Lemmer
blamed the delays on the assistant
attorney general.
Assistant Attorney General Leon
Cohan called it a "self-serving
statement." George Bourgon, of
the labor relations division of the
attorney general's office, added,
"To blame the Assistant Attorney
General for a 15-day delay while
the judge must take 5 months to
make a decision is clearly im-
proper. The fault lies with the
large load of work that the court
must handle."
Lemmer was unavailable last
night for comment on either of
these cases.
Individual University employes
affiliated with Local 1583, Amer-
ican Federation of State, County
and Municipal Employes have
joined the walkout.
University bus drivers, who are
not unionized, continued working
today. Arrangements made by the
plant department made it possible
for them to continue working
without crossing picket lines. One
or the bus drivers reported that
there was "light harassment" by
the picketers when buses passea
by their posts.
The picket lines stopped not
only the construction workers but
also all deliveries to the sites. All
truck drivers, most of whom were
union members, consented readily
to picketers' requests that they
not cross picket lines.

contractor depended on that de- I
livery.I
Pickets at the Hoover Plant near
the stadium would not allow plant
workers to cross their lines, al-
though they would allow profes-
sional and administrative person-
nel to pass. There were about a
dozen tradesmen who would not
strike but did not attempt to
cross the picket lines.
The skilled tradesmen have
led by the Temporary Trades
Council, (TTC) which they set
up last year. According to its
chairman, Robert Radtke, the
TTC has met with University
management since the first of
the year" with no results.
Picketing Schedules
Radtke and TTC recording sec-
retary David Farrington have
been arranging picketing sched-
ules for the men for today. They
plan to continue picketing at all
construction sites and at the
Hoover plant.
Both TTC leaders and Prebenda
have emphasized the adamance
of the workers this time. "The
men decided to refuse to work
if anyone is fired,'" according to
Prebenda.
He added that if the Univer-
sity attempts to use an infundtion
forcing them back to work that
"they will resign en masse." The
men have no strike fund but
"they are so disgusted with work-
ing for the University that they
feel it is worth the risk they are
taking."
Lemmer, University personnel
officer Russell Reister, his aide
James Thiry and an additional
unidentified man were seen driv-
ing around campus to look at the
picket areas.
To avoid the discontinuation of
bus services, the plant department
is parking the buses as far as five
miles away from the plant grounds
and is fueling the buses at a
private oil company in Ann Arbor.
Bus drivers are reported to sym-
pathize with the strikers but fear
reprisals from their superiors if
they try to help.

Read'
Daily
Classifieds
Ads.

ORGANIZATION NOTICES
.....w:~.. .~V.V~tfl.%W.V.W 4V.V.SV.W.W4.V. .44...' M a ..m: i

WASHINGTON tiP) - A select
White House panel yesterday rec-
ommended establishment of a new
federal bank to finance complete
college education costs for any
qualified student regardless of his
own financial resources.
Repayments on the proposed
education loans would be stretch-
ed over 30 or 40 years with bor-
rowers paying off indebtedness in
conjunction with annual federal
income tax payments.
To be considered for a loan, a
student would pledge a small per-
centage of his anticipated income
for a 30-or 40-year period after
graduation.
The panel suggested a repay-
ment schedule of 1 per cent of
gross income over 30 years for
each $3,000 borrowed.
The recommendation was sub-
mitted to government education
officials for study by the Panel
on Educational Innovation, a
group of prominent American
educators conducting research un-
der the auspices of President
Johnson's Science Advisory Com-
mittee.
The proposaldoes not carry
White House endorsement and
appears certain to stir new con-
troversy on the subject of how to
pay for a higher education.
The recommendation drew im-
mediate criticism from the Na-
tionalAssociation of State Uni-
versities and Land Grant Col-
leges and from some independent
education experts who charged it
would create inflationary college
pricing and life-long indebtedness
for borrowers.
On the other hand, the pro-
posal is expected to find favorrin
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It would be able to lend student
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A $15,000 loan was suggested

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"We're submitting this recom-
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whatever colleges or universities
they choose."
The panel proposed the money
for the funding should be bor-
rowed at going government rates.

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms' are available in
Rm. 1011 SAB.,,
AFS Club meeting for old and new
members on Sept. 10 from 7 to 8 p.m.,
in Room 3A Union.
Baha'i Student Group plans informal
discussion Fri., Sept, 8, at 8 p.m. at
520 Ashley. Call 662-3548 if you need
transportation. All interested welcome.
* * *
U. of M. Chess Club is having an or-
I ganizational meeting on Sept. 8, at

7:30 p.m. in the Union, 3rd floor, Room
3C.
* * *
La Sociedad Hispanica plans Una Ter-
tulia, with coffee, conversation, His-
panic music, on Mon., Sept. 11, 3-5
p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. Anyone interest-
ed in practicing their Spanish invited,
* * *
Guild House is holding a luncheon on'
Fri., Sept. 8, from 12-1 p.m., 802 Mon-
roe. The speaker will be George White,
"Poverty and Art: Understanding Polar-
itles."
Michigan Christian Fellowship has
lecture on Sept. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in the
UGLI Multipurpose Room. Speaker will
be Ted Ward on "Man: Super-Animal."

I

The strikers did not try to use
force to keep trucks from pass-
ing. One truck was allowed to pass
when the driver claimed that his,

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