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August 31, 1967 - Image 110

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-08-31

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TH TR ,iIAY. A1I(.i1ST Ril 1gtll

«.H IC I A I A t .__*StItt4_5,S4SA.

xUjl S1, 1001

IN CIA AFTERMATH:

IVSA

Congress Gropes

f

By ST H ISHEI AN F S N
and JOHN LOTTIER
Special to the Daily.
First of Two Parts
Vhat would you think if I ran
out of funds,
Vould you stand up
nd walkout on me?
ive me some pay
from the of CIA
nd I'll try not to sell out on thee.
get by with a little help
from my friends,
Iride the pie with a little help
from my friends,
spy with a little help
from my friends-...
COLLEGE PARK, Md. So
ent the theme song of the dis-
dents at the end of the National
udent Congress and so ran the
micism voiced here five months
ter the NSA-CIA funding-fiasco
as revealed.
Housed at the tree-shaded,
niversity of Maryland, some 1100
rticipants- spent 13 days im-
ersed in a carnival-like con-
omeration of meetings, speeches,
W'kshops, bulI-sessions, and late-
ur entertainment.
In the aftermath of the CIA
fair NSA has emerged as a con-
sed organization, unsure of its
st and future effectiveness its
vn internal structure, and even
s constituency and legitimacy.
espite optimistic predictions
om NSA staff officers 'before
e ranks were divided over most,
Lic policy issues, including Viet-
m, civil rights, black power and
er the immediate "focus" of
*e organization - whether it
ild be nationally or campus
dented. Before the throngs re-
.ed to their 326 member
bools, there were radical, lib-
al; moderate and conservative
uciuses; also called "counter-
nvention" sponsoreed by the
udents for a Democratic So-
ty; and, then; a walkout by the
sappointed radical delegates.
Headline Grabbers
This was,din.a sense, partica ly
bmerged by the headline grab-
!r: the first National Student
nference on Drugs funded by aY
deral grant and featuring LSD
ru Timothy Leary; a birth con-
D1 exhibit (free-samples) in the
ning hail run by Bill Baird,
esently under indictment in
assachusetts for violating that
ate's bir t h control laws;
eeches by AssistantSecretary of
,ate William Bundy, economist
ihn Kenneth Galbraith, and
veral U'.S. Senators and a call to
ganize a "dump LBJ" move-
ent for 1968.

To preclude any possible crisis]
over the February disclosures in;
"Ramparts Magazine" concern-
ing the' link with the CIA, the
NSA staff had been doing ground-
work long before the Congress
officially'convened on August 13.
Several days' earlier, NSA Presi-
dent- and former Rhodes scholar.,
W. 'Eugene Groves had announced
the transfer of the remaining
mortgage payments on the' NSA
offices in downtown Washington
from -the CIA, --.thereby breaking
the last financial ties hbetween the
two organizations. Moreover, the
opening administrative plenary
session was expressly 'devoted. to
a free-wheelingdebate on the
entanglement.
Symbiotic Relationship -
Iobert Armory Jr., past Deputy
Director of the CIA, defended the
symbiotic relationship "in the latex
forties and early fifties, there- was1
a threat to free institutions." The!
CIA had acted, he contended, as1
a 'benefactor to' a struggling, fi-
ancially unstable NSA, and in
fact, he went on, during the Mc-
Carthy hate campaign, it was the1
CIA that covertly funded liberal
projects which . nobody in the
State Department would touch.f
Groves added that NSA was "not
tainted," and that the "tellingt
point is the actions that one takes
that determine the morality."'
But Carey McWilliams Jr., a
professor a t Oberlin College
strongly disagreed, arguing that
the "decision to accept'CIA money
considerally mal-oriented the as-t
sociation . . The object of
philosophy is to sell out," he wryly
continued. "The question is for
what price. Did NSA get a good
price? No"
In fact, SDS upstaged the as-
sociation by inviting writers Sol
Stern, a "Ramparts" editor and
the writer of the original NSA-
CIA story; Andrew Kopkind for-
merly of "The New Republic; and
James Ridgeway, an associate
editor of The New Republic. Bill
Gerson, a University of Maryland
grad, and acting local SDS chief
argued that "NSA is thoroughly
corrupted, tainted, and beyond;
redemption." Stern then launched
into a blistering attack on the mo-
tives of the officers, and the dan-
ger of secrecy and subversion.
'Cold War Games'
"The NSA didn't need the CIA
to play cold war games. It had
always played cold war games...
For over 15 years more than 100
idealistic young people knew the
organization was being used in
a monstrous war. Why, after 15
years, did it take a staff member
'to call it a lie... The game will

have to be changed," Stern as-
serted.
Kopkind challenged the set-up
of the Congress: "They know it
doesn't matter what they say up
there. It's all a charade.
We all know the foolishness and
irrelevance of speeches given at
conventions . . The fact that
all of us are contributing to this
alternative, the SDS counter-con-
vention, someway undermines NSA
- that's what we're here for." He
continued: "The question 'What
is the role of secrecy in a free
society' is meaningless. There is
no role of secrecy in a free so-
ciety."
Ridgeway attacked what many
many consider another of NSA's
weaknesses its inability to
carry out its programs effectively.
"If you want to have a student
power movement you're going to
start from scratch," he noted.
"What's the use of taking $50,000
to run a conference on poty why
don't you spend, the money keep-
ing people out jail? Why
aren't there any blacks around
here?"
The radicals were upset by the
current resolution on Vietnam,
which calls for negotiations, but
fails to advocate unilateral with-
drawal by the United States. But
beyond this, they argue that since
the NSA has a dubious consti-
tuency, any pronouncement is in
fact meaningless and unconvin-
cing. The focus should be shifted
from the "codification of policy"
which contains over 100 "BPD's"

-basic policy declarations-to a
nationwide activist program. For
example, last year, the delegates
mandated all member schools to
hold draft ranking referenda-
only four schools participated.
For these reasons, there were
early stirrings to abolish the or-
ganization completely, and to cre-
ate in its ashes a student union
composed of local campus chap-
ters. Groves himself, perhaps in an
effort to divert criticism of this
nature, announced at a press con-
ference early in the week, that he
favored a 50 cent levy on every
college student, as well as the divi-
sion of NSA into two bodies-one
a campus educational-oriented,
tax exempt branch, the other a
non-exempt political arm which
could; for example, work to end
the Vietnam war and to aid the
civil rights movement.
Groves' proposals were in a
sense by-products of an umbilical
cord relationshiphwith the govern-
ment. In fact he revealed that
over a 15 year period, the CIA
had poured $3 million into the
NSA coffers-some years, over 70
per cent of the organization's bud-
get came from the agency. Even
after the CIA only $18,000 of the
NSA's $700,000 yearly budget
comes from member dues - the
vast majority of NSA's capital
flowing in from federal agencies,,
private foundations, and unions.
Aside from the covert CIA fund-
ing, some delegates questioned
whether even these ties should be
severed.
From this framework, the dele-'

)r Nee
gates fractionalized , into several
camps: the radicals who wanted
to completely do away with NSA
and to begin to organize students
on the campus level; the liberals
who were obsessed with the Viet-
nam war and next year's presiden-
tial elections; the conservatives
intent on preserving the present
foundation status, by diverting
ene;gies from national politics to
campus issues such as student
housing, etc.; and the bulk of the
delegates known condescendingly
as "the great confused," who ap-
peared to be attending the two-
week Congress with the sole in-
tent of enjoying their paid "vaca-
tion," and who chose to let NSA.
staff officers do all the thinking.
The radical caucus at the con-
vention, led by Wayne State and
the University, could muster to-
gether only about '50 delegates,
who found themselves greatly out-
numbered bytthe more complacent
members on the plenary votes. On
a motion to forego the usual time-
consuming debate on this year's
set of resolutions-broadly re-
fered to as "issue area legislation"
-the radicals were defeated by}
more than a two-to-one margin,
One Wayne State delegate bit-
terly remarked that "this place is
like a church. The officers are the
-~

Directions

Phone434-0130
OPEN 7:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
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deacons and the members say
'Amen' to everything from the po-
dium." The vote, however, did
reveal a distinct geographical pat-
tern: the Michigan, Metropolitan
New York, and Wisconsin regions
were the most critical of the cur-
rent NSA structure, while the
South, Minnesota, New England,
New York State, and the great
Western regions generally sup-
ported the present set-up.
The Michigan region, composed
of the University, Wayne State,
Michigan State, Eastern Michigan,
and other state colleges voted to
pass up votes on legislation as a
form of protest, condemning
"paper" legislation as action taken
without any backbone.
But the sessions still continued,
and eventually a series of resolu-
tions were approved for this year's
codification: a strong call for stu-
dent power at the individual uni-

versities steered through the
plenary by Edward Schwartz, na.
tional affairs vice president; a call
for the abolition of the compulsory
military draft, and an attendant
program of draft education and
aid to draft dissenters; and a pro-
black power statement, that rec-
ognized that the Negroes should
attempt to gain their liberties "by
any means necessary." The latter
resolution was initially defeated
on the floor, but in later recon-
sideration, passed by slim major-
ity. On the Vietnam war no con-
sensus could be reached, and last
year's statement remains on the
books.
Despite the high sounding words,
the NSA congress was disturbing-
ly similar to another Congress less
than 15 miles away in the Na-
tion's Capital.
TOMORROW: Towards a
National Student Union

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