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August 31, 1967 - Image 111

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-08-31

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THURSDAY; AUGUST 31,'1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

tl

UAW
Auto
Union Toet
Target For
Strike Today
Labor Negotiators
Reject Proposals As
'Entirely Inadequate'
DETROIT (A) - Its negotiators
having unanimously recommend-
ed rejection of new contract of-
fers from the Big Three auto-
makers, the United Auto Workers
Union turned to selection of a
strike target yesterday.
The target will be named by the
UAW's 26-member international
executive board today. Only seven
days will then remain before cur-
rent three-year pacts at all three
expire.
The union's negotiators termed
practically identical offers from
General Motors, Ford and Chrys-
ler "entirely inadequate and in-
equitable when measured against
the fantastic profitibility of the
automotive industry."
In making offers Tuesday, the
companies said they constituted
"the highest wage increase ever
offered" the union. A GM spokes-
man estimated the minimum pro-
posed increase in a typical work-
er's pay would be $1,700 over the
three-year period.
Formal rejection is anticipated
today from union councils rep-
resenting GM, Ford and Chrysler
plants across the country and
then by the international execu-
tive board. A target then will be
named by the board.
Traditionally the union negoti-
ates a contract at one company
and thenusesthat agreement as
a pattern for settlement =with the
other two. If one is struck, the
other two are allowed to operate.
odds have shifted In recent
days to General Motors being the
target.
A reason for the shift to GM
In target speculation is that by
taking on the more .formidable
opponent and winning, Reuther
could enhance his standing in the
American labor movement.
He has been embroiled in a run-
ning and thus far losing battle
with AFL-CIO President George
Meany.,
The UAW turned down Tuesday
a proposal by financially trou-
bled American Motors Corp.,
smallest of the U.S. automakers,
to continue their present agree-
ment two years. UAW Vice Presi-
dent Pat Greathouse said the un-
ion "will take another look" after
it settles with the Big Three.
Meanwhile in Flint yesterday
pickets from the International So-
ciety of Skilled Tradesa(ISST)
scuffled with workers at three
General Motors Corp. plants in a
dispute over union recognition.
At least three men were treated
for facial cuts and bruises at a
Flint hospital and released.
ISST officials said the pickets
were protesting the National La-
bor Relations Board's recent re-
fusal to grant a representation
election.

Rejects

1Mig

Senate Votes
Confirmatio"n

American Observers To Begin
Inspection of Vietnam Election

Offer

- .-

Of Marshall
11 Base Opposition
On Political Grounds,
Say Race 'No Issue
WASHINGTON () - Thurgood
Marshall, the first Negro nomi-
nated to the Supreme Court, won
solid Senate confirmation yester-
day, 77 days after President John-
son named him to the high tri-
bunal.
The vote was 69 to 11 with all
of the oppo, ents being from the
deep south except Sen. Robert C.
Byrd (W-W Va). All 11 are Demo-
crats except Republican Strom
Thurmond of South Carolina.
After the vote, Marshall de-
clared "I am greatly honored."

S A I G O N (A) - Twenty-two
Americans named by President
Johnson to observe South Viet-
nam's national election are to be-
gin looking over the country to-
day with armed .escorts guarding
against terrorist hazards.
"Part of the plan is to see as
much as possible," said roving
Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge,
former envoy to Saigon, on his
arrival with -the group as guide
and adviser yesterday.
However, George D. Aiken,
dean of Senate Republicans, says
the poll-watching mission of 22
prominent Americans in South
Vietnam "can't amount to a
damn.'
Furthermore, the 75-year-old

Vermonter said in an interview
yesterday the South Vietnamese
had good reason to be humiliated
by the arrival of the White House
task force, sent by President
Johnson to observe the Sept. 3
presidential elections.
Former Premier Tran Van
Huong, a leading civilian candi-
date for the South Vietnamese
presidency, said Tuesday that the
observer group is causing the Viet-
namese people "grieve and hu-
miliation."
The observers-both supporters
and critics of U.S. policy in Viet-
nam-include senators, governors,
mayors, religious leaders, labor,
business and news executives.
The Americans are joining 60

THURGOOD MARSHALL became the first Negro Supreme Court Justice yesterday when the Sen-
ate confirmed his appointment by an overwhel ming majority. Marshall succeeds Justice Tom C.
Clark, who resigned at the end of the last term to avoid any conflict of interest because of the
appointment of his son, Ramsey, as attorney general. Opposition to Marshall's appointment came
primarily from southern Senators who disliked his "ultra liberal" and "individual activist" attitudes.
They claimed that his appointment created a built-in majority in the Supreme Court that would
undermine the constitutional roots of the coun try. The opposing Senators said that Marshall's
race was not a deciding factor in their vtes.
Nasser Assistant, 150 Oficers
Believed Jailed During Purge

E

t

KHARTOUM, Sudan ()-Trav-
elers from Cairo said yesterday
there were reports President Ga-
mal Abdel Nasser had staged a
lightning purge and Marshal Ab-
del Hakim Amer, his former right-
hand man, was arrested. They
said as many as 150 other Egyp-
tian officers were believed de-
tained.
Nasser arrived here Tuesday for
the Arab summit meeting and ac-
cording to these accounts he may
have acted to prevent a possible
rebellion while he was out of the
country.
Similar reports of a Nasser
crackdown came from other Arab
capitals, leading one Western dip-
lomat to observe: "All our reports

are second hand. But they have
spread so wide and so fast that we
are inclined to believe something
is going on in Cairo."
Officials said they are not in
the position to confirm or to deny
the reports, which circulated in
various forms in a number of Arab
capitals.
Amer resigned as supreme
armed forces commander and first
vice president after the defeat in
the war with Israel in Junerat a
time when a large number cf
Egyptian generals and others were
dropped.
There have been frequent ru-
mors of , dissention among the
higher ranks of Egypt's armed

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Milhiken Calls for Arbitrator
In Detroit Teacher Deadlock

forces since Israel's lightning vic-
tory.
At least one report of an at-
tempted coup came from Algeris
last June. This was just before
Nasser offered to resign and his
resignation was rejected.
Egypt's leadership has been re-
ported badly split between ex-
treme leftists, moderate leftists,
and those who say Egypt must
improve relations with the West
as its only hope of emerging from
economic blight that followed the
war.,
At the summit conference, call-
ed to "eliminate the results of
Israeli aggression," Nasser was
reported to have adopted a tone
of moderation, hinting that the
time was not ripe for a new mil-
itary adventure aaginst Israel.
Meanwhile President Tito's sep-
cial envoy on his way to Washing-
ton to explain to President John-
son the Yugoslav leader's plan for
ending the Arab-Israeli stalemate.
American officials, while appre-
ciating Tito's efforts, are doubtful
that his plan would be acceptable
to either side.
The Tito plan is understood to
propose that:
-Israel evacuate all territories
it occupied during the war in
June ;
-The United Nations peace-
keeping force, evicted by Egypt's
President Gamal Abdel Nasser be-
fore the war broke out, be re-
established.
-The great powers guarantee
Israel's borders and the Arabs
give up their contention that they
have been at war with Israel since
that country was established,
without recognizing her, however.

'Ultra Liberal'HongKon
"Let me take this opportunity,"
his statement said, "to affirm my
deep faith in this nation and its
people, and. to pledge that I shalli B ritis h r nb
be ever mindful of my obligation
to the Constitution and to the HONG KONG (P)-A British
goal of equal justice under law." diplomat was manhandled in Pe-
The senators who opposed Mar- king yesterday and, Communist
shall said they did so because he mobs rioted in Hong Kong in a
is an "ultra liberal" and "a judi- violent reaction to a clash in Lon-
cial activist" in his constitutional don between police and members
philosophy. of Red China's legation.
He succeeds Justice Tom C. In a dispatch from Peking, the
Clark, who resigned at the end of Tokyo newspaper Yomiur said
the last term to avoid any conflict several hundrded persons roughed
of interest because of the appoint- up Donald Hopson, British charge
ment of his son, Ramsey, to be Da sd o rit bhag
attorne gener l~d'af aresand forced hmt o
attorney general. his head.h
Yesterday's vote was the thirdYomiuri said anti-British dem-
contofedcef onstrators called Hopson from an
Marshall by the Senate. It approv- apartment for foreign diplomats
ed him in 1962 by a 54-16 as judge and demanded an apology for
of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Tuesday's fighting in London.
New York and in 1965 by voice London police battled Chinese dip-
vote as solctor geneal. lomatic personnel, who brandish-
'Favored Atheists' ed axes, iron bars and baseball
Byrd, in joining the opposition, bats.
protested that decisions of the In Hong Kong, gangs of in-
court in recent years, many by I flamed Chinese Communists begin
5-4 margins, have favored atheists, roving the streets, rioting and
Communists and criminals and throwing bombs. Police finally
otherwise undermined the consti- were forced to open fire, killing
tutional roots of the nation. one demonstrator and wounding
In view of that, he said, the two others.
present unpredictable balance of In London, Peking and Hong
the court will become, with Mar- Kong, the dispute centered on this
shall's appointment, "a built-in crown colony on China's southern
majority that will do injury to border. On Aug. 22, Chinese burn-
constitutional government." ed out the British legation in Pe-
Commenting that some persons kingafter Britain ignored Red
will call him a racist and anti- China's ultimatum to free Corn-
Negro, Byrd said "I'd like to vote munists held in Hong Kong for
for Thurgood Marshall, particu- sedition.
t larly because he is a Negro," but In an attempt to halt the bit-
he couldn't let Marshall's race in- terness, Foreign Secretary George
fluence his vote.I Brown of Britain sent a message
Neither supporters nor backers to Foreingn Minister Chen Yi of
Redtherssu rter s uerbk Red China calling for talks to
made Marshall's race an issue, butnomlzreain.Bwnm-
hi aponmn1asdsrbda normalize relations. Brown, em-
his appointment was described as phasized the gravity with which
a symbol of hope and progress for Britain views present relations.
Aterhes.In the Peking incident, Yom-
After the vote, Senate Demo- iuri said Chinese soldiers inter-
cratic Leader Mike Mansfield of vened after Hopson was beset by
Montana, said: "This is a shining, demonstrators and he apparently
hour for Mr. Marshall, President was unhurt.
Johnson, the Senate and the Unit- The Czechoslovak news agency
ed States of America." CTK had a'slightly different ver-
The confirmation demonstrated sion. It said not oily was Hopson
that "what counts is what you forced to bow his head but he had
are, not who you are who your to listen to an insulting protest by
ancestors were," Mansfield added. teen-age Red Guards, then was

BERNARDO0
MENORCA
SOFT, SOFT CONTOURED
LEATHER TO HUG THE INSTEP
AND PUT A RING AROUND THE TOE
4-.
f- } r'-
" 'is f

LANSING (IP)-Acting Gov. Wil-
liam Milliken yesterday said he is
bringing in a nationally recog-
nized arbitrator to help avoid a
deadlock in Detroit's school situ-
ation.
Milliken said he acted because
he was told negotiations on teach-
er contracts are breaking down in*
the Detroit school district.
He is acting governor while Gov.
George Romney is attending a
midwest governors' conference at
Missouri.
Milliken said Ronald W. Hadgh-
ton, co-director of the Institute
of Labor and Industrial Relations
at Wayne State University, has

Mob Attacks
assy Attache
compelled to apologize for the
London incident. CTK said only
then was Hopson permitted to
leave as the demonstrators shout-
ed anti-British slogans.
Yomiuri said that apparently on
orders from Chairman Mao Tse-
tung's leadership, anti-British
demonstrations had been halted
since the legation was burned and
Premier Chou Enlai reprimanded
Red Guards who were responsible.
Police had their hands full with
Communist mobs in Hong Kong
who were reacting to the London
incident. In one riot, police shot
and killed a man who threw a
bomb at them.
One mob tried to set a city bus
afire, then threw a bomb at po-
lice when they intervened. Two
other bombs were hurled at police
from nearby upper story windows.
Police opened fire with pistols,
wounding two Chinese.

other foreigners from 23 nations
as official guests of the Saigon
government to watch the close of
the campaign and the vote Sun-
day for president, vice president
and a 60-man Senate.
Vietnam Unique
U.S. Ambassador Ellsworth
Bunker told them: "In its journey
on the road to constitutional gov-
ernment, Vietnam is unique in
that it is holding elections while
there is conflict within its
borders."
"The very least we could do is
ask the South Vietnamese to come
over here and supervise our elec-
tions next November," contended
Aiken, who has been in the Sen-
ate since 1940.
Aiken, a member of the Foreign
Relations Committee, termed the
appointment of the observer group
a "long shot on the part of the
Guerrilla Raid
On the military front yesterday
a guerrilla raid on Quang Ngai
freed 997 prisoners and capped
rising Viet Cong pressures against
the national election, only four
days away, which is to give South
Vietnam an elected government.
Two guerrilla platoons, perhaps
60 men, virtually had the run of
Quang Ngai, a provincial capital
330 miles northeast of Saigon, for
more than an hour before dawn.
They shelled the U.S. advisory
compound, killing one American
and wounding 15. They killed
four civilans, hammered at Viet-
namese troop installations and
blasted down the gate of the pro-
vincial prison, where Viet Cong
suspects made up the bulk of the
1,329 inmates. They induced 977
to head for the hills. It was orig-
inally reported 1,200 made the
break. But 352 chose to stay be-
hind.
Military sources said at least
10 of the guerrillas were killed.

World News Roundup

JACKSON, -Miss. - Mississippi's
growing Negro vote left little im-
pression yesterday on Democratic
runoff results that swept con-
servatives into state offices and
crushed all 22 Negro candidates
in local races.
Authough Negro leaders con-
ceded the Negro vote was split
across the state, civil rights lead-
er Charles Evers said he sent a
telegram to President Johnson
asking him to order new elections
in three southwest Mississippi
counties with big Negro major-
ities.
Negro votes helped Rep. John!
Bell Williams, outspoken foe of
the Lyndon Johnson administra-
tin, overwhelm State Treasurer
William Winter in the governor's
race.
With 2,028 of the 2,124 pre-
cincts reporting, Williams had
362,269 votes to 304,195 for Win-

ter, who tried in vain to shake
the liberal label Williams attached
to him.
*
MILWAUKEE - Mayor Henry
Maier, reacting to two successive
nights of racial tensions raised by
Negro open housing marches into
the virtually all-white South Side,
slapped a 30-day ban yesterday
on demonstrations.
The step apparently will cut
off further marches into the pre-
dominantly Polish section of the
city.
Two nights of marches have re-
sulted in 24 injuries and 61 arrests.
Maier, who imposed a stiff cur-
few on Milwaukee after Negro
rioting erupted July 30, avoided a
curfew declaring a new state of
emergency yesterday.
Instead he banned demonstra-
tions between 4 p.m. and 9 a.m.
on all Milwaukee streets and side-
walks.

agreed to begin fact-finding pro-1
ceedings in the Detroit dispute.
Meanwhile, Wayne County Cir-
cuit Judge Charles Farmer yes-
terday dismissed a complaint by
the Cherry Hill School District
seeking to force some200 teach-
ers to show up for work whether
they have a contract or not.
Farmer ruled that contracts!
signed by 53 teachers with the.:
district are not valid.
No Legal Recourse
If the teachers failed to report
to classrooms for the start of
school next Tuesday, Farmer rul-
ed, the district has no legal re-
course to force them to do so.
"Teachers who do not report
cannot be construed to be on
strike because they are not le-
gally employes of the school dis-
trict," he said.,
Farmer added that if the dis-
trict wished to hire an entirely
new teaching staff, members of
the Cherry Hill Education Asso-
ciation would have no legal re-
course to block the action. Bar-
gaining on new contracts are ex-
pected to resume as soon as pos-
sible.
No Major Impact
Farmer said he doubted that
this ruling would have any major
impact on negotiations in other
Michigan. school districts because
only narrow issues were involved
in the Cherry Hill case.
The 53 teachers who had signed
contracts indicated that they
would not honor them without
agreement on a master contract
covering all the teachers.
Contract disputes are still un-
settled in 130 other Michiganj
school districts, and state teachers'
associations have asked U.S. Dis-
trict Judge Talbot Smith to bar
Michigan courts from issuing
strike injunctions.

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THEYURE GOING U STEAL THE CROWN JEWELS?

NOW SHOWING

One of many styles to choose from.

YOU MUST BE JOKING!

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MICHAEL CRAWFORDLDUVER REED
HARRY ANDREWS
in
'A~IICCNICD OOR
withJAMES DONALD
DANIEL MASSEY' MICHAEL HOHlOERlN -GADHIELLA LICODI " LOTE IAlP

306 S. State
IT'S SO CONVENIENT!
SO FULL OF IDEAS!.
G(JUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
(Across from Law School)
NOON LUNCHlEON
__MONDAYS & FRIDAYS
BUFFET, ONLY 25c
INFORMED SPEAKERS; DISCUSSION
Monday Series:
"THE STUDENT
SUB CULTURE"

--_ -- _.

The University of Michigan
GILBERT & SULLIVAN SOCIETY
MASS MEETING

I

Get-Acquainted
MIXER
Sunday, September 10
8:15 P.M.

Screenpay by DICK CLEMENT and IAN LA FRENAIS - From an oiginal stoy by MICHAEL WINNER
Directed by MICHAELWINNER . Produced by MAURICE FOSTER and BEN ARBEID
A GILDORSCIMITAR PRODUCTION " A UNIVERSAL RELEASE
Thurs. 7, 9:05 P.M.
Fri., Sat.; Sun. 7, 9:05, 11:10 P.M.
Mon.-Labor Day Only, 6, 8:05, 10:10 P.M.
Tues.-Thurs. 7, 9:05 P.M..
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Academy Award Nominee Short

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