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April 11, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-04-11

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, April 11. 1968

Pa0e TWQ THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i -r' . . . . r

I

poetry and prose

I

records

Starts
FR IDAY

Winners Claim Hopwoods

Seraphim Offers Mozart Opera

By MARCIA ABRAMSON
The annual Avery and Jule
Hopwood Awards for creative
writing were presented to 26
students last night in a cere-
mony at Rackham Lecture Hall.-
The 17 major and 13 minor
awards added up to $21,150.
Poet Denise Levertov dis-
cussed "The Origins of a Poem"
in the annual Hopwood Lecture
before the presentation.
The' Hopwood Awards have
been presented for 38 years'
from an endowment fund be-
queathed by playwright Avery
Hopwood and vary in amount
according to the quality of the
work.
Thomas Snapp, '68, won the,
largest award of $2500 for " My
Tower," in the major'. poetry
category.'
Mack Owen, Grad, received
three awards totaling $,1950
with a major drama award of
$800 for 'Two Plays," a major
essay award of $400 for.
"Strindberg and Beckett" and
a major poetry award of $750
for "Small Town and Other
Poems."
Two awards were won by
both John Conron, Grad, and
Barbara Van Noord, '69. Con-
ron received a major fiction
award of $750 for "Seven
Stories" and a major poetry,
award of $750 for "Playing
Games with the Atlantic." Miss
Van-Noord won a minor fiction
award of $400 for "Love Inter-
rogate" and a minor' poetry
award of $500 for "Ochre Ver-
million."
Three other awards were giv-
en for m'ajor drama. James
Hatch, Grad, won $1000 for
"The Love Song of Dionysus
Jones."Awards of $750 were
given to Robert Hay, '68, for
"The Crier in the Street" and
Fritz Lyon, '68, for "Two Plays
with Short Titles."'
Additional major essay
awards went to David Wru-
bel, '68, who received $1000
for "Shelley's Phenomenalism;"
Dale Harger, '68, who won $00
for "Two Essays in Literary
Criticism" and James Garvey,
Grad, ~who received $500 for.,
"Alain Robbe-Grillet and the
New Aesthetic."
Alan Boatman, who graduat-
ed in December 1967, received
the award for a major fiction
noyel, "Summer's Lie."
Other awards in the major
fiction short story division were
given to Joyce Winslow, '68,
who won $1200 for "Benjamin,
Burning" and Richard Higiri-
botham, wh~o won'$700. for
"Just Between the Three of
Us."
Additional major poetry,
awards were $600 to Harriet
Stolorow, Grad, for "In the Ca-
sino There Are No Windows"
and $400 to Joseph R. Fargnoli,

By R. A. PERRY and Paminos, and Pedrillo is butI
Opera records have always been a less engrossing and' less fanci-
a major investment for the stu- ful Papageno.
dent music-lover with a limited This early Singspiel, of course,
budget. The only way to avoid the does not pretend to the inner}
high price of multi-disc sets was sanctums of mystery and profun-
to purchase a "highlights" ver- dity that Die Zauberflote does, nor
sion, not a satisfying solution, or are the arias as intricately reveal-
to settle for repressings of older, ing of individual character. It is
sonically-dated performances on all surface charm and quaint mel-
6heaper labels, odrama, and, from opening aria
Barring rare exceptions, such to closing chorus, thoroughly de-

Osmin: one can almost see him,
whip in one hand, frothing At
the mouth in his desire for
Blonde.
The dialog has been included in
this recording and has been given,
with the aid of stereo separation,
a most realistic reading. The or-
chestra is kept at a swinging clipt
by Josef Krips, who is responsible
for much of the success of this
high quality and low cost release.

There were five Generals inside,,,
and one Private outside,,
The problem was to het the five
Generals inside:
and avoid getting waylaid by a
beautiful countess

1

as the Glyndebourne Mozart re-

I

-Daily-Richard Lee
Hopwood Lecturer Levertov

cordings now on Turnabout, these
sets could not compare in singing,
direction, or sound, to the more
expensive labels.
Seraphim, the low-priced label
released by Angel, is changing all
that. Several months ago they is-.
sued a splendid, new stereo re-
cording of von Weber's Der Freis-
chutz, and this month they have
put on the market an all-new re-
cording of Mozart's The Abduction
from the Seraglio that is easily
the best version in the catalog.I
Without exception the cast sings
splendidly and energetically, the
direction of Josef Krips is witty
and idiomatic, and the recorded'
sound emerges clear and well-de-
fined.
The Abduction from the Sera-
glio is an early Mozart opera and
therefore possesses not the inef-
fable grandeur, characterization,
and humanity of those supreme
operas Don Giovanni, Le Nozze de
Figaro, and Die Zauberflote, yet
it is lyrical and amusing, and
holds both serene and virtuosic.
What amazed me for the first
time on rehearing this opera was
the enormous similarity between
it and Mozart's last opera, Die
Zauberflote, at least in casting
if not in depth of content.
There is the sinister Pasha, who,
like his later counterpart Sarastro,
turns out to be quite benevolent.
The evil lackey Osmin finds a
later facsimile in the buffo part
of Monostatos. Belmonte and Con-
stanze are light-hearted TaminoI
Shows at l -3-5-7-9p.m.

ightful A few words on another new
Nicolai Gedda's: Belmonte and Angel release: Mozart's Requiem
Anneliese Rothenberger's Con- K. 626, in its form as completed,
stanze are both beautifully and by Sussmayr, has always seemed
expressively sung. The latter's to be a ponderous work of dubious
flashy aria "Marten aller Arten" merit. Of the twelve sections, Mo-
(Torture me and flay me) has zart only orchestrated three be-
been given more fiery renditions fore his death, and Sussmayr then
before, but the soprano does sur- applied the heavy orchestration
mount the coloratura hurdles to the whole work, giving rise, as
easily. Lucia Popp, as the viva- one critic has put it, to a "thick
cious Blonde, adds another fine grey crust."
performance to her growing cred- However, I have not heard a
its. recording which brought out what

PAUL

jfk h 5

II

rad, fdr "In Search of the
amp.
Graduate students are al-
lowed to compete in the ma-
jordivision. Undergraduates are
eligible for minor Hopwood
awards. Seniors may choose to
compete in either major or
minor contests.
In the minor drama division,
a special award of $1,000 was
given to Melvin Gordon, '69, for
"The clay: Golem."
Two other minor awards were
given in drama: $700 to John
Slade, '70, for "Important
Games," and $600 to Lawrence
Kasdan, '70, for "Two One-Act
Plays."
Four awards were given for
minor essay: Carolyn Delevitt,
'69M, received an award of $500
for "Thoughts and Theses";
Laney Shaw, '68, $400 for "Two
Essays"; Paul D. Mandel, $400
for "The Study of Japahese
Haiku"; and Ross Miller, '68,
$300 for "The 'Conversation'
Poems."
In the minor fiction division,
in addition to the award to
Miss Van Noord, three awards
were given. An award of $300
went to Sharon Stiver, '70, for
"Next Saturday Morning"; an
award of $300 went to Leanore
Block, '68, for "Portraits", and
an award of $300 went to Mi-
chael Williams, '70,_ for "The
Tragedy of the Old Man with
One Eye."
In the minor poetry division,
in addition to Miss Van Noord's
award, an award of $800 was
given to Michael Lermer, '69, for
"The Forgotten Place."

Judges in the drama division
were actor Will Geer and Rob-
ert G. Shedd of the University
of Maryland, a former Hop-
wood winner. Essay judges were
critic Willard Thorp of Prince-
ton University and Charles C.
Walcutt, critic and author of
the recent book "Man's Chang-
ing 4 Masque" and a former
Hopwood winner.
Judges in the novel division
were Don Barthelme and Joyce
Carol Oates, both novelists and
short story writers. In the short
story division, judges were
Katherine Gauss Jackson of
Harper's Magazine, and Padma
Perera, short story 'writer and
former Hopwood winner.
Poetry judges were poets Mil-
ler Williams and John Woods.
Prof. Robert F. Haugh of
the English department, Hop-
wood Committee chairman, an-
nouncel the winners.
VINS
DEl
FRANCE
DETROIT-PARIS
Jet $306
SJuly31--Aug.29

Special credit; must be given to j
Gottlob Frick's thoroughly ogrelyI
Steiger, ' Heat'
Win Oscars
By The Associated Press
Rod Steiger and Katharine Hep-
burn won the best actor and ac-
tress awards at last night's an-
nual Academy Awards presenta-
tions for "In the Heat of the
Night" and "Guess Who's Coming
to Dinner" respectively.
"In the Heat of the Night" was
named best picture of the year.
Best foreign film was "Closely
Watched Trains."
Winning Oscars for best sup-
porting roles were Estelle Parsons
for "Bonnie and Clyde" and
George Kennedy for "Cool Hand
Luke." Mike Nichols won the best
director award for "The Grad-
uate."
- - W ~U U UI

glory and emotion there is in the
Requiem as does the new version
led by conductor Rafael Fruh-
beck de Burgos. The four soloists
and especially Wilhelm Pitz's l
chorus seem unusually inspired.

SYLVA KOSINATECHNICOLOR*
TOM -OI1ANDREW DUGUN -JOHNH lJ4 -WRNRPET[ERS F MI GO(0R
Screenplay by PETER STONE and FRANK iARLOFF Story by FRANK TARLOFF - Directed by JACK SWGHT '
Associate Producer PETER STONE -Produced by HALE CHESTER AnAlbion Cop.Producton A UNIVERSAL PICTURE

Ten 'years.ago this motion picture
could riot have possibly been made:
Even o year ago THE FOX could not
have been made. .:.not quite this vay"

TODAY
DIAL 8-6416

You'l/
laugh

4

n

to f
fu

all the
way
the
ineral. 2'j

I']

SANDY DENNIS 'KEIR DULLEA
ANNE HEYWOOD
AS ELIENNARCH

At,

t W

Phone 761-4146

LIN D. f1.I. lAWRENCE'S
A RAYMOND ST ROSS PRODUCT{ON .n Asoc iito -w 4!PMO[ION P1 ,TURLS INTERNATIONAL, INC. -
Scenia , LEW!S JOHN CARCNOan HOWARD KOCH 'rw.L e ua i o'm ,cwD. H.LAWRAENCE ' ~~~RAYMODND SIROS *rct~pMAR YQ4,~
w - -,k~ ,DELUXE . ' CLARIDGE PICTURES ;

SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDiENCES
QD IN COLOR FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS
Friday: PAUL NEWMAN as HARRY FRIGG

III

i

LAST NIGHT TO SEE:

WI 4

- I+

ACADEMY AWARD FAVORITE

*

"PAWNBROKER" -700
"CLOSELY WATCHED TRAINS" - 9:05

"CLOSELY WATCHED TRAINS"
PLUS BONUS FEATURE-ROD STEIGER in "THE PAWNBROKER"

"A SUPERIOR CONCOCTION
OFWIT AND FARCE...

Starts Tomorrow--Triple Feature
ALEC GUINNESS COMEDY ORGY!

in the best tradition of
satirical good humor."
--Timae Maigazine
"A wild ride into a
world of uproarious
fantasy!"
-Saf. Review of Lit.
"Its humors are so ingen-
ious and persistent that
pit is -one big chuckle
from beginning to end!"
-N. Y. Times

SLID SATIRE...a choice
piece of movie foolery!"
-Newsweek

ALEC

IJUINNESS
The:i
a 99
wth STANLEY HOLLOWAY
A ) Arthur Rank Organization Presentation

"MR.GUINESS keeps you
fascinated and
0 d entertained"
-N.Y. Times
IN THE
_$ SIT
also starring JOAN GREENWOOD and CEIL PARKER
A Michael Balcon-Ealing Studios Production
AJ.4Arthur Rank Organization Presentation
A CONTNENTAL 0ISTRIBUTiNG, UQ. RFIlELLAF

I

"ITS GENTLE COMEDY AND FRISKY WIT ARE
IN THE AMIABLE TRADITION OF 'ARSENIC
AND OLD LACE' ALEC GUNESS BEST ACTOR
OF THE YEAR SCORES A NEW TRIUMPH!"
-Cue Magazine
"A SPOOF ON THE HIGHEST LEVEL!"
-N. Y. Times
AN OOJTS
ALEC DENNIS VALERIE JOAN
GUINNESS -PRICEL-HOBSON -GREENWOOD
i.e., a ,o ,,,, A. -, D. D -w Directed by Robert Hamer
A Mihael Bakon Production Made at Ealing Studios

40

I

I

_.
;.
! 1 10T}J/fD Di}dif Crec:..} };ww r.w ,...,r ....i. w.er..a.. .iaiw...w we oc eae"

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