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April 07, 1968 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-04-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Su~nrivAnri 7. MAR

____ ___ ___ ___ ____ ___ ___ ___ ___ ____ ___ ___ ___ ____ ___ ___ ___ ___..--. .'.l

uy/ i-,NI II I 17uo

X

{ashington Rioting Subsides
s '12,000 Troops Move In

i i

(Continued from Page 1)
ning had a steady flow of reports
of indidents that- indicated the
city had not regained complete
calm.
There were several small fires,
a gun battle when police stoppedi
a car near the Maryland line, a'
policeman who reported he was.
shot at, and several looting reports.,
Civilians were reported in two in-
stances to have dropped tear gas
grenades into- cars.
A day earlier,'the capital city's
skyline had been ablaze with
more than 250 fires. But there
were no major fires last night, al-
though smoke still could be seen'
drifting over the downtown area.
The mayor said there were no
plans to move the troops, despite
the calm.
There were scattered incidents
yesterday, including two instances,
of sniper fire, said Cyrus Vance,
P r e s i d e n t Johnson's -trouble-
shooter.
- The mayor said 5,000 people
had been given food through
churches and welfare agencies.
Smoke still tinged the chilly,
night air Friday night from 250
fires that gutted small stores on
7th street and 14th street north-
west and along H street north-
east, not far from Capitol Hill.
There were a few new fires, but
firemnen worked unhampered in
the predominantly Negro areas.
Army patrols extended beyond
.the three major Negro areas that

suffered the bulk of the damage
into northwest Washington's em-
bassy row and outlying streets.
Two-thirds of Washington's
800,000 population is Negro, but
the damage- was primarily in the
poorer Shaw and Cardozo areas.
Heavily - guarded g o v e r n m e n t'
buildings, including the White
House and Capitol, were never
threateiied.
Mayor Washington was con-
sidering using city schools to billet
homeless families..
Police had reported arresting
about 1,000 persons, most for vio-
lating a dusk-to-dawn curfew dur-
ing a relatively quiet night Fri-
day. But soon after the curfew,
ended at 6:30 a.m., reports of loot-
ing began to flow into police head-
quarters.
Then, about noon, looting re-
ports dipped after Deputy Police
Chief Raymond S. Pyles ordered
the city's Civil Disturbance Unit
to arrest all looters. Earlier, of-
ficers had been told to arrest only,
felony offenders and ignore those
committing lesser crimes.
About 100 yards from a precinct,
police station on New York Av-
enue, three white men were in-
jured iwhen a crowd of Negroes
smashed the windshield "of their
sports car. The crowd overturned
the vehicle after the men fled.
In one block of 7th Street, eight
stores had been destroyed by fire.
Nine others had been looted. Four
businesses with "Soul Brother"

signs in their windows appeared
Marines from a nearby Quan-
stores on Pennsylvania Avenueza
tico, Va., base guarded looted
stores on Pennsylvania Avenue
southeast of Capitol Hill.
The Capitol building, normally
toured by 45,000 visitors daily
during this Easter season, was
closed to tourists. Large, olive-drab
Army trucks were parked at the
Capitol's main steps, where sol-
diers lounged in the afternoon sun.
A machine gun' that had been
placed on- the steps Friday ,night
was gone.
The annual Cherry Blossom
Festival, which brought thousands
of tourists-many of them school
children-to the capital, had been
canceled earlier.
Eight ,WIn
G uggortheim:
Fellowl.ships
Eight University professors have,
been, awarded .1968 Guggenheim
Fellowships in the arts and
sciences. The University was sixth
In the country in the number of
grants received along with MIT.
Some 291 fellows were chosen
from more than 2000 applicants
on the basis of past contributions
in their fields and quality of the
project which the grants will sup-
port.
Receiving' the most fellowships
was the University of California
at Berkeley with 19. Columbia
University received Z5, Yale Uni-
versity 13 and Harvard University
12. UCLA and Princeton Univer-
sity each were granted nine
awards, followed by the Univer-
sity and MIT.
A total of 91 colleges and uni-
versities were represented. Fel-
lowships are open to all residents
of the Western Hemisphere and
the Philippines.
Fellowship winners from the
University and their departments
include Profs. Richard D. Alex-
auder, zoology; Albert Cohen,
music; Eric . Lonneberg, psy-
chology; and Shaw Livermore, Jr.,
history.
Others are Profs. J.M.E. Mora-
vosik, philosophy; Roy A. Rap-
paport, anthropology; L U n e 1
Rothkrug, history; and Alfred
C.T. Wu, physics.U

Paratroops
Move Into
Windy City
(Continued fron Page 1)
ery. Among them were 150 Juve-
niles.
In addition to the nine fatali-
ties traced to the disorders, one
of them killed in an exchange of
shots with police, two other
deaths were being investigated for
possible relation to'the riots.
One was a 10-month-old boy,
burned to death in his home. The
other was a 35-year-old woman,
shot to death.
In his telegram to the President
asking for "up to 5,000 troops,"
Shapiro said: "Under existing cir-
cumstances the law enforcement
resources of the state are unable
to suppress the serious domestic
violence in or near the city of
Chicago.
Shapiro said he was asked to
make the request by Mayor Rich-
ard J. Daley of Chicago. Earlier
in the day Mayor Daley clamped
a strict 7 p.m. curfew .on persons
under 21, and the National
Guard was beefed up by two more
battalions.
But last night the curfew was
defied by 200 youths on the South
Side who marched arm-in-arm on
63rd Street. Police reported sev-
eral small fires, shattered windows
and overturned autos in the area.
The area hit harQest Friday
night-west Madison Street-was
reported relatively quiet last night.
Armored personnel carriers car-
*'ying guardsmen with rifles and
.38-caliber machine guns patroled
the street, which was virtually de-
serted except for police and
guardsmen.
On the near North Side-the
scene Friday night 'of some loot-
ing-police were reported running
out of ammunition after returning
the fire of 'snipers for hours. All
lights in the area were out.
Police and National Guards-
men swooped into a near North-
west Side area where; another
sniper was reported yesterday af-
terrioon and rounded up 50 per-
sons. Another rifleman was re-
ported trapped in a South Side
building.
But the most critical area was?
a stretch about five miles west of
Chicago's Loop along Madison
Street, the city's north-south me-
dian, where nine new fires broke
out. Firemen trying to close hy-
drants were targets of a sniper.
The stricken area ranges west of
Chicago Stadium, a West Side
landmark.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
- -tSS '

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for. which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear only once.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
SUNDAY, APRIL 7
Day alendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Semi-
nar - Program-for Institutional Man-
agement Education --,"Leadership for
Women Executives": Statler-Hilton Inn,
8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Chester Hampson, Double Bass: School
of Music Recital Hall, 2:30 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Sarah MacNeal, Viola: School of Music
Recital Hall, 4:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Carl Dreyer's "Pas-
sion of Joan of Arc": Architecture Au-
ditorium, 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
John Strobel, French Horn: School of
3020 Washtenow - 434-1782
Wednesday-Saturday-Sunday

Music Recital Hall, 8:30 p.m.
School of Music - University Arts
Chorale - Maynard Klein, Conductor:
Hill Auditorium, 8:30 p.m.
Events Monday
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"Management of Managers No.
56": Michigan Union, 8:15 a.m, to
5:00 p.m. and 7:00 and 9:00 p.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-Program for Institutional Man-:
agement Education - ".Leadership for
Women' Executives": Statler-Hilton Inn,
8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
(Continued on Page 10)

HIGH CAMP MATINEES!!
ALL SEATS 75c
Thurs - :00-3:00; Fri., Sat. & Sun.--I :00
SEE ALL NEW HIGH
TARZANADVENTURE!
CHALLENGE
THE WORLD'S
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WEAPONS!
HENRY KOVACK , .
DAVIDOPATASHU

4.

7 Everyl
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is
waiting
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k oX'I

President Johnson Cancels

Joint Session
(Continued from Page 1)

ments, "the matter \of a military
adviser or advisers for Ambassa-
dor Harriman, for anything he
might be called upon to do.
This reference gained meaning
for another overseas indication
that North Vietnam is preparing
for a direct contact. The pro-
Communist Japanese Denpa news
agency said that Hanoi has ap-
pointed its representatives to es-
tablish contact with U.S. repre-
sentatives.
,Soviet sources in London said
two days ago plans were afoot for
a meeting in Moscow within a
few days.t
Westmoreland's Successor
By Christian's account,- much
of yesterday's White House con-
ference was devoted to discus-
sions of a successor to Westmore-
land, who will step out of the
Vietnam command in July to be-
come Army chief of staff, and to
the filling of other military posts
now vacant or soon to need filling.
The two also discussed the sit-
uation in South Vietnam and the
panhandle of North Vietnam,.
Christian said, as well as the re-
lief of the garrison at Khe Sanh,
the bombing restrictions in North

I

of Congress
Vietnam imposed by Johnson
last Sunday, and the moderniza-
tion of the Army of the. Republic
of Vietnam.*
The general and the President
apparently met alone all morn-
ing, but were ' joined at lunch
time by others-Secretary of De-
fense Clark M. Clifford, Under-
secretary of State Nicholas Katz-
enbach, Gen. Earle G.. Wheeler,
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, retired Gen. Maxwell D.
Taylor, Director Richard Helms
of the Central Intelligence Agency,
Walt Whitman Rostow, presi-
dential assistant for national se-
curity affairs, and other White
House staff members.
President Advised
"Throughout the morning, ;the
President has been kept advised,
of the situation here in Washing-
ton and other cities where dis-
turbances have bheen occurring,"
Christian told reporters.
Under Johnson's proclamation
Friday authorizing the use of
troops and national guardsmen to
maintain law and order in the
capital, sources said that the fed-
eral troop strength was being in-
creased to 12,500 in a major effort
to quell the disorders.

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Saturday and Sunday
JOAN OF ARC
Directed by Carl Dreyer, 1928
"A succession of close-ups, filmed from Joan's
point of view, both physically and emotionally,

NOMINATED FOR
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