100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 06, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, April 6, 1968

I

Saturday.-- 7 ArIlt 6 I I - /W .1- W

MEMORIAL SERVICE Guard, Curfew Quell Riot
Students H onor D r.K ing at1 Hil Continued from Page 1) and thoroughfares with traffic. the day. They surged down near-

U

.

By JIM NEUBACHER
Stunned regret swept across theI
campus yesterday in the wake of
the slaying of civil rights leader
the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King
Thursday. More than 4,500 Uni-
versity students, many wearing
black armbands, attended mem-
orial, services and silent marches
In respect for the memory of the
minister shot in Memphis. All
noon classes were cancelled for the
memorial service.
By eight o'clock this morning,
about 100 students, mostly Negro,
were circling the Diag in silent
tribute to the late Dr. King. They
were later joined by more students
and continued standing quietly on
the Diag until noon.
At noon; students filled the seats
and aisles of Hill Aud. and over
500 flooded onto the terrace to
listen to memorial services over
loudspeakers.
After the services, over 1,000 stu-
dents marched silently, around the
campus and city in a tribute or-
ganized by students from the so-
cial work school.j
And in response to student sug-
gestion, Vice President for Aca-
dlemic Af fairs, Allan F. Smith,
said serious consideration will be
given to establishing an endowed
Martin Luther King chair and
an endowment fund for Marin
Luther King scholarships.
All University functions were
suspended for the services at
which Dean William Haber, of the
literary college, P r o f. Albert
Wheeler, of the Medical school,
Rev. Emmett Green of Ann Ar-
bor's Second Baptist Church, and

Samuel Jones, '68 BAd, deliveredI
addresses.
"This one man was the buffer
between us and the brutality
which lives within us," Haber be-
gan. "More significantly, he em-
phasized what needed to be done,
and done fast. Social revolutions
- and in his non-violent way he
was a revolutionary leader - are
not a weekend affair.
"From Montgomery and Selma
and the Lincoln Memorial he
hammered away at the problems
of inequality, neglect and injus-
tices," Haber said.
"Martin Luther King had a
dream," he continued, referring to
Dr. King's famous plea for racial
equality delivered at the massive!
Washington civil rights march in
1963. "But yesterday that dream
became a nightmare.'
"The dream must remain. His
dream must become our dream,"
Haber concluded.
Wheeler urged action to pre-
serve King's "dream for Ameri-
ca." "If we were to spend forever
grieving we would ciesecrate the
name of Martin Luther King. We
must address ourselves to the
problems in our cities and our so-
ciety," he said.
He criticized the "passive rac-
ists" who slow the march for
freedom by refusing to become in-
volved in the problems of blacks
in America.
Rev. Green attacked more ac-
tive racism. "We need to be
mourned," he said. "We are the
ones left to live in a racist society
of two warring camps, black and
white. We are dying daily of the

sickness that puts us at war withI
ourselves, with each other, broth-
ers and sisters, black and white."
Jones agreed saying, "we must
all take strength from his philo-
sophy and love."
"But it's time for whites to be-
gin to respect our blackness our
humanity, our needs, and our
wants," the student said.
The ten front rows of the two
center sections of the auditorium
were reserved for the Negro stu-
dents and staff in attendance,
This was done to insure seats nearI
the front for those participating in
the demonstrations on the Diag
just before the services began.
"It's kind of like a funeral,"
one black student said. "Who sits
up in front - the relatives or
the friends?"
Campaigns
fPostponed
By The Associated Press
Much of the nation's activity
slowed yesterday in the wake of
the assassination of the Rev. Dr.
Martin Luther King.
Democratic Presidential hope-
fulE Eugene McCarthy and Robert
F. Kennedy both canceled weekend
campaign appearances.I
McCarthy announced yesterday
he is cancelling his California
campaign activities for the week-
end out of respect to Dr. King.
An aide said that after his
speech in Los Angeles last night
the Minnesota Democratic presi-
dential hopefuls will fly to Wash-
ington and will attend the joint
session of Congress on Monday in
honor of the slain civil rights
leader.
Kennedy abanidoned political
campaigning to condemn a "mind-
less menace of violence in Amer-
ica" which brought King's death.
He briefly interrupted his hectic
campaign schedule after King's
assassination and canceled several
political appearances in Cleveland
and Louisiana.
Republican candidate Richard
M. Nixon also canceled all cam-
paigned appearances scheduled
today in Minnesota.
Two baseball season opening
games were postponed as the
sports world reacted to the King
assassination and President John-
son's declaration of Sunday as a
National Day of Mourning for the
slain civil rights leader.
Because of the state of emer-
gency declared in Wayne County,
Michigan Democrats have post-
poned indefinitely all Jefferson-
Jackson Day activities set for Sat-
urday in Detroit.
)RPORATION presents

Several stores were looted as a Detroit police reported fireI
crowd of Negroes, many of them alarms were pulled, apparently by
teenagers, lined 12th Street in students, in two predominantly
the afternoon, pelting cars driven Negro high schools, and the stu-
by whites with bottles and bricks. dents vacated the buildings. Po-
A police department spokesman ,lice said the students returned toI
Inspector James Bannon, said classes when no fires were dis-
looting was minor in camparison covered.
with last July's riot, which left 43 Incidents occurred at Cass
persons dead and millions of dol- Technical High School, Grand
lars of property damage. River and West Grand Boulevard.-
Police sealed off 12th Street at Another disturbance was re-
West Grand Boulevard and moved ported on Detroit's West Side
north in a phalanx of squad cars where students were dismissed for

by streets, tossing rocks and break-
ing windows,
School officials closed eight
other schools. Memorial services
for Dr. King were aired over the
school system's radio and televis-
ion facilities for students still in
classes.
In Saginaw, a mass meeting was
. called by a group of moderate Ne
gro ministers with the announced
purpose of convincing the com-
munity violence would be desecra-
tion of King's memory.

HIGH CAMP MATINEES !!
ALL SEATS 75c
Thurs.-1 :00-3 00; Fri., Sat. & Sun.-1 :00
SEE - ALL NEW HN1
TARZAN ADVENTUREI
CHALLENGE
TH E WOR LD'S Ml
MOST
MODERN
WEAPONS!-
HENRY-KOVACK
DAVID OPATASHU

4

accompanied by an armored riot
car.
The heavy show of force
caused Nearly all Negroes on the
street to disperse, and by 8 p.m.,
when the curfew went into effect,
the street was practically desert-
ed.

About an hour after the police
moved up 12th Street, the first
National Guardsmen began arriv-
ing into the city, a 'spokesman for
Cavanagh said. When night fell,
an hour and a half later, calm
had returned to the streets.
"Roaming bands and tension
have assumed such proportions,
particularly in the 12th Street
area, that it is deemed wise to
take this precautionary step," Gov.
George Romney told a midafter-
noon news conference in Lansing
when he announced the Guard
would be moved into Detroit.
Some 1,500 guardsmen en-
camped at Central High School,
two blocks west of 12th Street.
After he arrived in Detroit from
Lansing, Romney declared a state
of emergency in all of Wayne
County, and the southern portions
of neighboring Oakland and Ma-
comb counties,
The youth shot in Highland
Park was identified as Robert
Vaughn, 19, of Detroit. Romney
said he was one of 20 Negroes who
went into a store bearing "Black
'Power" signs and began looting.
Romney said Vaughn backed into
an officer after five of the' youths
were arrested and was killed when
the'patrolman's gun went off.
The governor said guardsmen
also were being sent to the sub-
urbs of Ecorse, River Rouge, Ham-
tramack and Highland Park.
Many Detroit businesses sent
their employes home early, and
the outbound rush of motorists
jammed the city's main streets

Demonstrations Hit
Man U.S. Colleges
(Continued from Page 1) Martin Luther King can be shot
In East Lansing, about 1,000 down, it shows the goals and
Michigan State University stu- techniques that black people will
dents marched on the State Cap- have to use."
itol. The march began after a 30- Students at Berkeley held a ral-
minute blockade of both entrances ly and, Boston students marched
to the MSU administration build- to Cambridge Commons, but no
ing following a service on campus disturbances were reported dur-
in the memory of Dr. King. ing either demonstration.
At Wayne State University in In Atlanta, 1,500 students from
Detroit, black students gathered the five predominantly black col-
in the student center under a pic- leges that comprise the Atlanta
ture of SNCC official H. Rap University complex staged a sym-
Brown, but no disturbance was pathy march.
reported. ' Student protest was not limited
In New York, all campuses of to the nation's college campuses.
the City University of New York j High school students across the
were closed, while 5,000 high country held demonstrations, and
school and college students gath- in' some cases, forced the admin-
ered in Central Park to mourn istration to' close the schools.
Dr. King's death. One speaker, In Detroit, three fires were
Jarvis Tyner, national secretary } started at Cass Technical High
I of the W. E. DuBois clubs, said School. Classes were dismissed at
"Give me freedom or give me high schools in Freeport, N.Y.,
death, because that's what it will Trenton, N.J., Toledo, Ohio and
take to change America." About many other cities.
300 policemen watched the dem-
onstration, but took no action.
About 3,000 students at the
University of California at Los"
Angeles listened to a tape-record- -_,
ed speech by Dr. King. Black stu-
dent leader Artie Ivy said, "If 3020 Washtenow - 434-1782
Wednesday-Saturday-Sunday

I0

Second class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 48104.
1 Daily except Monday .during regular
academic school year.
Fall and winter subscription rate:
$4.50 per term by carrier ($5 by mail);
$8.00 for regular academic school year
($9 by mail).

DIAL 8-6416

4TH AND FINAL WEEK

I

-Daily-James Forsyth
Overflow at Hill listened on PA system

"Exquisite is only the
first word that surges
in my mind as an ap-
propriate description
of this exceptional
film."
-Bosley Crowther;
New York Times
"May well be the
most beautiful film
ever made."
-Newsweek

f

TONIGHT
American Traditional
Folk
Grady Tuck
Bob White
Sara Melton
Pat Reynolds
Continuous Performances
NO COVER
MARK'S
605 E. William
Coffees, Pastries, &
Sahdwiches
Open Daily-10 A.M, to 1 P.M.

THE MIRISCH CC

A BLAKE EDWARDSPRODUCTION

sometimnes truth is more exciting

TECHNIC LOR*j,,.
Shows at 1-3-5--7-9
Continuous from 1 p.m. every day
April 7-13

I

HIS MOTION PICTURE
IS CONCEIVED TO ERASE
THE MEMORY OF LESLIE
BRAVERMAN--WHO HAD
THE POOR TASTE TO

- K MU$C Y MEMRYMAitlMI0c RCA ECOK*S #il INN
COLOR by Deluxe - PANAVISION* ns
1:1O-3:1O-5:10-7:15-9:25ma
E-rogram Information 2-6264,
SUNDAY
Matinees are NOT
Continuous!

DROP DEAD, WITHOUT

1

WARNING,
THEREBY
INFLICTING

NE--

DR. MARTIN NIEMOELLER
will visit Ann Arbor, April 10-14
Dr. Martin Niemoeller, distinguished German pastor and a
president of the World Council of Churches, became a liv-
ing symbol of Christian resistance to a totalitarian govern-
-ment during World War 11. He was suspended from his
parish and continued his opposition to the government.
Finally. imprisoned, he was held in the concentration camps
of Sachsenhausen and Dachau until liberation. Among his
many books are: The First Commandment, God Is My
Fuehrer, Dachau Sermons, From U-Boat to Pulpit.
Schedule of appearances:
Wednesday, April 10-
4-6 P.M.-Canterbury House, 330 Maynard
*Address-Discussion: "A Citizen and His Country: A Crisis of Conscience"
8 P.M.-First Presbyterian Church, 1432 Washtenaw
*Address Discussion: "The Christian Church in a World of Conflict"
Thursday, April 11-
4-6 P.M.-Canterbury House
*Address-Discussion: "A Citizen and His Country: A Crisis of Conscience"
7:30 P.M.-First Presbyterian Church, Maundy Thursday Service
"Walking With Christ Through Suffering and Death"
9 P.M.-Ark Coffee House, 1421 Hill Street

ON HIS FAMILY
AND FRIENDS ALL
SORTS OF BURDEN-
SOME INCONVENIENCES,
LIKE FOR OPENERS,

WATCHED
TS
Directed by Jiri Menzel - A Crlo Ponti presentation.
Distributed by ° ":' :Company.
PLUS EXTRA
BONUS FEATURE
ROD STEIGER
Academy Award Nominee
"BEST ACTOR"
in his finest role
THE
PA WN BROKER1'
SHOW TIMES
FRIDAY and SATURDAY:
"Pawnbroker"-3:15-7:00-10:45
"Closely Watched Trains"-5 :15-9:05
SUNDAY:

p

THE FUNERAL...

J2
see

4

GEORGE SEGAL
JACK WARDEN JESSICA WAITFR PHY! 12NRA/MAM . IfSFPN WISPMAN

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan