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April 06, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-04-06

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Saturday, April 6, 1968

THE M'1CHIGAN DAILY'

Page Three

Saturday, April 6, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- - , , .

'AMERICAN TRAGEDY':
World Stunned, ArousedIa 1ege

Of

Khe Sanh
Reserv

By Slaying of Rev. King

'p.cn
ad-rin i

By The Associated Press
The murder of Dr. Martin Lu-
ther King stunned people across
the country and throughout the'
world yesterday, and aroused fears
that racial violence would shatter
America's internal peace.?
Political leaders paused to
mourn King's death as Presidentj
Lyndon Johnson declared Sunday"
a national day of mourning and
ordered all flags flown at half'
mast.
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy (D-
* N.Y.) speaking to a convention of
Cleveland businessmen, called for
a "cleansing of our whole society
to remove this sickness from our
soul."i

The New York Democrat issued
a harsh indictment of violence in
America as he condemned the
"mindless menace of violence in
America which again today stains
our land and every one of our
lives."
Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy de-
clared Dr. Martin Luther King's
death "is on our minds and con-
sciences,'' and said the nation
must now give Negroes full mem-
bership in American society.
The Minnesota Democrat learn-
ed of King's death while confer-
ring with labor leaders in San
Francisco Thursday on his first
full day of campaigning for pres-
ident in California's June 4 pri-

mary fight against Kennedy.
'The death of Dr."Martin Lu-
t'ier King is a tragedy for all
Americans," he said. "Not only
have his people lost a noble and
1 great leader, but all people, espe- D elay A in ed
cially Americans, have lost a man
of peace. We can only grieve."
And Republican presidential as-A t F s ri
pirant Richard M. Nixon canceled
the slaying of King, a spokesman'e
said. Peace iove
Former Gov. George C. Wallace
of Alabama called the slaying "a WASHINGTON W) 4- Final
senseless, regrettable and tragic decisions on call-up of thousands
act" and said it "is another ex- of R e s e r v is t s and National
ample of the breakdown of lai Guardsmen have been delayed
and order in this country which because of preparations - now
must be stopped." canceled-for President Johnson's
Leaders Abroad Resond ' Honolulu conference on Vietnam.

".7u---'

- - -w - -M

'_

IN .J em ocrats 1 u orse Grief swept peoples and nation- that
al leaders abroad as news of King's by J
death reached foreign capitals. defe
Hughes as Favorite Son d The London Sun wrote King's ped,
death "may well bring on a sum-!iea
mer of the most catastrophic riots peac
NEW. BRUNSWICK, N.J. A')- Kennedy (D-N.Y.), Eugene Mc- America has ever seen" o D
New Jersey Democratic leaders Carthy (D-Minn), and Vice-Pres- The Copenhagen daily newspa- Mo
have endorsed Gov. Richard J. ident Hubert Humphrey attended per B. T. declared "The shot inRee
Hughes as a favorite son candi- the closed meeting as observers. Memphis against the black man with
date for the Democratic presiden- .Hughes said none of the three on the balcony will signal the be- T
tial nomination in what the gov- representatives a d d r e s s e d the inning of a black summer for mob
enrtermed a temporary move" meeting.o lc sme o
ernor rmdh state neutral pendingmeeting the United States of America." to p
to keep the The organization's current plans "In his death," said Philippine in V
further developments. call for Hughes' name to appear Foreign Secretary Narciso Ramos, ular
Hlughes did not rule out the on the primary ballot only as the "America has lost a leader, tee the
possibility the state may commit leader of New Jersey's 32-member colored peoples oftheworld a wak
itself to a candidate before the delegation. Hughes had been a champion in their fight for dig- T
Democratic National Convention staunch supporter of President nity and equality of opportunity, late
l:August. Johnson prior to the president'sniyadeultofporntyltr
Representatives of Sen. Robert F. announcement Sunday that he and the world a voice of human mon
won't seek re-election, The gov- conscience." and
fenor now says he has an "open Vitatrato an
erin. American soldiers in Vietnam ptc
There are two separate parts to heard the news with shock, dis- t
the New Jersey June 4 primary belief, regret, and in some cases T
BURSLEY ballot: one for a nonbinding indifference. Many paid tribute to day,
BURLESQUE " presidential popularity contest and Dr. King as a great leader of his thed
one for the selection of conven- people. "I think there's going to Wed
tion delegates. be a lot of troubles at home," said Bu
COMING APRIL 8 Supporters of McCarthy have a white sergeant. Btion
said they would enter a slate of "I guess he asked for t," said a said
Sugested for candidates to oppose the organi- white corporal from North Caro- M.d
S u e eszation candidates for convention lina. "What did he ever do for final
mature audiences delegates. Kennedy has not said anyone?" finsl
what his plans are as far as a Early morning news broadcasts Tr
New Jersey primary is concerned, stunned South Atfrca. There was that
no immediate official comment, week
but it was thought that in govern- to c:
ment circles there would be regret set.
tempered with the opinion that Th
the shooting bore out South Afri- final
cas claims that racial integration byp
L D does not work.' conc
Saturday and Sunday
IAET STONIGI
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about the last six hours of her life; the inquisition }
and the trial, the burning at the stake-the pas- -_
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of the Joan of Arc story."'
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eanwhile, there is speculation
the new call-up announced
Johnson last Sunday might be
Mrred indefinitely or even drop-
to avoid jarring the fragile
ce atmosphere.
efense officials had said last
day the first increments of a
erve-Guard muster might come
in three days.
'hey spoke in -terms of initial
ilization of up to about 16,000
provide needed support troops
Vietnam and to replace a reg-
Marine unit which was sent
re in an emergency step in the
e of the enemy Tet offensive.
'hese same officials indicated a
r call-up, over a period of
Zths, of up to 50,000 Reservists
Guardsmen. These would be
nly Army, to fill out the cen-
core of U.S.-based troops de-
ed by the Vietnam war.
he three days were up yester-
with no sign of any action on
call-tp. Army staff officers
expected a go-ahead on

I
F
r

'jft d
Lede;
Call-up
<P
VC Abandon
Attacks O
Marine Post
KHE SANH (P)-The 76-day
enemy siege of Khe Sanh was of-
ficially declared lifted yesterday
as U.S. Marines and Army units
struck out through the hills look-
ing for vanishing North Vietnam-
ese.
Senior military officers hinted
that some of the 6,000 Marines
manning the base may be pulled
out.
While the possibility of anoth-
er battle was not excluded, it Ap-
S.-. peared the Viet Cong forces had
abandoned any attempt to wipe
....' out the base astride an invasion
route from Laos.
VC Forces Cut
U.S. officers said the North Viet-
namese force around Khe Sanh,
once estimated at 20,000, had been
sociated Press reduced to about 7,000. It is not
S known where the troops were go-
ing.sarI
4 big relief force, which startgd
«. a drive Monday to connect \Khe
~F ii* Sanh with ground routes, appeared
to be seeking the Viet Cong in the
hills nort# and south of Khe Sanh.
As for ah Sanh, a U.S. gener-
Lks al said Marines there might be
reduced from 6,000 to 1,000 men
or that South Vietnamese or U.S.
im, once and Army troops may replace some
ditionally halt Marines.
other military Heedless of occasional shells,
the entire, ter- Marines in the formerly beseiged
;ratic Republic Khe Sanh fortress emerged from
withdraw all their underground bunkers and
forces of the some leaped atop the bunkers to
from South watch half a dozen helicopter
ie Vietnamese gunships work over a hill 2,000
their own yards away.

-As
Khe Sanh Marines Emerge from Bunker
Hanoi Says Bombing Goes
May Jeopardize Peace Tal

nesday.
ut defense: authorities
ed about the apparent
Secretary of Defense
Clifford had not yet
decisions on specific

ques-
delay
Clark
made
num-j

and units to be mustered.
hese authorities emphasized
figures used earlier in the
were round numbers, subject
hange as plans were finally
he authorities said Clifford's
decisions had been delayed
reparations for the Honolulu
erence.

TOKYO (Pi - North Vietnam
cast doubt yesterday on talks
with the United States; charging
U.S. planes still were "barba-
rously bombing and strafing popu-
lation centers" in the North.
In a reference to President
Johnson's order Sunday curtail-
ing the bombing of North Viet-
nam, Hanoi radio broadcast a
statement by the Foreign Ministry
saying U.S. airplanes had since
attacked populated areas and
dropped mines in rivers and
canals.I
"These criminal actions laid
bare the perfidy of the ruling
circles of the United States that
announced limited bombings and
the false promise there would be
no attacks on principal popu-
lated districts and on food-pro-
ducing districts of North Viet-
nam," the statement said.
The statement further claimed
U.S. air raids on the North
"have actually been increased"
since Johnson ordered the bomb-
ing curtailed.
This was the strongest state-
ment yet throwing doubt on the
road to negotiations since Hanoi

and Washington agreed to con-
tacts earlier in the week.
Soviet sources in London said,
however, they expect talks be-
tween representatives of the U.S.
and Hanoi to begin next week in,
Moscow. And they said North
Vietnam has assured Washington
privately that no major offen-
sives would be launched by the
North if the U.S. bombings were
totally halted.
The Soviet governnrent said it
fully supports Hanoi's statement
of willingness to talk with the
United States about a complete
halt in the bombing of North
Vietnam.
The statement issued by the
official news agency Tass said
Hanoi's position "indicates a
realistic way of ending the, war
in Vietnam" and restoring a nor-
mal situation in Southeast Asia.
But the statement added that
the U.S. limitation of bombing to
areas in North Vietnam's south-
ern panhandle was insufficient to
make peace possible.
Tass reiterated demands ;sim-
ilar to previous demands by
Hanoi that "the United States
should put an end to the aggres-

sive- war in Vietna
for all and uncon
the bombings and4
operations against t
ritory of the Democ
of North Vietnam,
its forces and the
satellite countries
Vietnam so that th
people can settle
affaUir0.

HT at
1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

i
, .
r
1I
j
1
_ I

At the same time, Red. China
expressed clashing views on the
course to be pursued in Vietnam.
The offic!al government New
China News Agency declared
Johnson's peace moves were "a
new trick." It urged the Vietna-
mese to fight onruntil U.S. troops
were driven from Vietnam.
Red China's news agency took
a shot at the Soviet Union, say-
ing Johnson made his peace offer
"in collaboration with the Soviet
revisionist clique."
President Nguyen Van ,Thieu,
meanwhile, wared the United
States he may repudiate any
political agreement on Vietnam
in which Saigon has no say, dip-
lomatic sources reported.
Thieu summoned envoys of the
allied governments earlier in the
week to the presidential palace to
express his misgivings over the
coming U.S. contacts with Hanoi.
Authoritative informants said
Thieu told the diplomats that the
United States has no right to dis-
cuss any political questions con-
cerning Vietnam in its direct talks
with Hanoi.

Their feeling was summed up
by one Marine this way: "If you
ask me, the heat is off Khe Sanh
once and for all."
Movement Normal
Trucks and jeeps moved around
again and Marines played catch
on the airstrip-neither was pos-
sible when the North Vietnamese
were pouring in up to 1,500 rounds
of mortar and artillery fire a day
at the height of the siege. Others
removed garbage or washed their
dirty clothes.
Until the lifting of the siege;
only hurried plane flights or air
drops supplied Khe Sanh. These
flights were made in a barrage of
enemy fire.
Prisoners had. said earlier this
year that North Veitnam planned
to make Khe tSanh the decisive
battle of the war. Critics of the
plan to keep' the Marines in the
isolated base in the northwest
corner of South Vietnam said it
could lead to another Dien Bien
Phu. The fall of that base in
1954 drove the French from Indo-
china.

U'

ours

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A. M.
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rio Plus Two
y $1.00
pension
Phone 761-7866

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11

Peacepuritypeanutsprurient
PETER GRIFFITH

[AYERS
DNE
2:30 Q m

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