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March 12, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-12

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Tuesday, March 121 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tuesday, March 12, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

BRITAIN PROTESTS:
White Rhodesia
Executes Blacks

SALISBURY, Rhodesia (IP) -
rwo black Africans convicted of
the political murder of another
black were hanged Monday by
Rhodesia's white minority govern-
ment. Britain immediately ruled
out further negotiations with its
breakaway colony.
Francis Chiresa and Taka Jere-
miah went to the gallows after a
special meeting of Prime Min-
ister Ian Smith's Cabinet decided
Sunday that "the law must take
its course."
Three other blacks convicted of
imurder had been hanged in Salis-
bury last week in spite of a re-
Evers Leading
in Mississippi
Civil rights leader Charles Evers
will make the strongest Negro bid
for a Mississippi. congressional
seat since reconstruction Tues-
day in his runoff against white
candidate Charles Griffith.
Evers, on leave as state field
secretary for the National Asso-
ciation for the Advancement of
Colored People, got 33,706 votes
in the'first round. Griffith led
six white candidates with 28,927
of the 114,871, votes.
Negro leaders, encouraged by
the Evers vote, hope to get a larg-
er vote "plus support from whites.
Three Negro candidates for the
same seat in recent years drew
only token votes.

prieve by Queen Elizabeth II.
The action was condemned by
Britain, the United States, other
nations around the world and two
committees of the United Nations.
Pope Paul VI appealed for clem-
ency for the more than 100 blacks
under death sentence in the ter-
ritory.
The latest executions heightened
pressure on British Prime Minister
Harold Wilson's government to act
against Rhodesia.
Commonwealth Secretary George
Thomson told a stormy session of
Parliament: "There can be no
question of resuming contacts with
the illegal regime."
Wilydn last week had reiterat-
ed that Britain would not use force
against Rhodesia. There were re-
ports, however, that tougher econ-
omic sanctions-including a ces-
sation of postal and telecommun-
ications services -. were being
considered againstRhodesia.
Thomson indicated that the U.N.
Security Council might soon take
up the situation. But Foreign Of-
fice sources said the government
has no intention of yielding its pri-
mary responsibility for the territ-
ory.
At the United Nations, Secre-
tary General U Thant denounced
the new hangings as "illegal and
savage acts" carried out "in de-
fiance of world public opinion."
U.N. members contend that the
regime holds power in Rhodesia
illegally and therefore lacks the
legal authority to conduct execu-
tions.

Associated Press
FARMERS GO HOG WILD
Members of the National Farmers Organization, (NFO), slaughtered a number of pigs yesterday
in Union City, Indiana, in an effort to force meat packers into signing contracts with NFO affil-
iates, and to raise the price of pork.
8 HOUR FIGHT:
So uth Vietnamese Army Hits
Hanoi Regulars Near DMZ

Senat
Civil
Movel
WASHINGTON (A-) - The Se(
ate yesterday approved 4 lanr
mark civil rights bill designed
strike down racial barriers in foi
fifths of the nation's housing.
The compromise measure, pass(
after nearly two months of debat
also embraces antiriot provisio:
federal protection for civil rigl
workers, and extended constit
tional guarantees for American Ix
dians.
The Senate passed the bill
to 20.
The bill was sent back to tl
House, where its fate is in clout
In 1966 the House passed
more limited open housing m--
sure which was strangled t deal
in the Senate by a filibuster.
Now the situation 1s revers(
and there is a question wheth
the House will accept the Sena
bill.
The basic provision of the I
would make it unlawful toi
fuse to sell or rent a dwelli
after a bona fide offer, "to ai
person because of race, color, x
ligion, or national origin."
Beginning in 1970, the prohit
tion aganist discrimination wou
. S P l
Se.Philip A. Hart

Rights
s tof

Approves

0 1

SAIGON OP)-South Vietnamese
army troops dealt a stinging blow
to a 600 man force of North Viet-
namese regulars just south of the
critical demilitarilzed zone, killing
102 of the enemy, Saigon head-
quarters reported Monday.
It said the government soldiers
encountered the enemy five miles

north of Dong Ha and six miles
below the DMZ Sunday and en-
gaged in an eight hour fight.
South Vietnamese losses were list-
ed as three killed and 37
wounded.
At the same time, U.S. Ma-
rines on the western end of the
DMZ at Khe Sanh took a 250
round enemy artillery barrage for

Bill;
louse

p : the third straight day. American
casualties were reported light.
U.S. fighter bombers countered
~ with attacks on Communist gun
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ;positions inside the DMZ, a for-
S rbuffer zone dividing the two{
SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND DEPARTMENT OF ART trnamsi
PRESENT SMETANA'S COMIC OPERA Actionin the war elsewhere
EIXL~~LdN ~A~kL~continued at a slackened pace
v but there were apprehensions and
_ predictions of a new outburst of,
THE "THE BARTERED BRIDE enemy activity at any time and+
TDthat the expected assaults would
(English Translation by Josef Blatt) be at any point free from the DMZ
Some officials now are ruling
Marc 21-24, 8 : 00P.M.. out Khe Sanh ashthe main Com-
M8 0munist target. They suggest Hue
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE masy eboehit again.This baeby Lt.iGefn
A Robert E. Cushman, commander
p All TiCkets-$3.00 of U.S. Marines in Vietnam, and
Vice President Nguyen Cao Ky.
Cushman contended the Com-
Mail orders accepted now. Make checks payable to "University of Michigan." Send munist troops around Khe Sanh
"have not felt capable of winning
self-addressed, stamped envelope to School of Music Opera, Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, there so they have not attacked."
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104. Box Office opens Monday, Mai-ch 18, 1968, 12:30 P.M. He said the enemy is capable of
attacking Hue but "we can pre-
vent this."
O d d S t a@A ~ 2 Ky told newsmen in Saigon

his expectation is the Communists
will strike at Hue and Saigon.
The government announced,
however, an easing of the curfew
it imposed on Saigon after the
start of the Communist new year,
offensive Jan. 31. The 7 p.m. to
7 a.m. curfew was changed to 8
p.m. to 6 a.m.
The government also announced
the firing of six province chiefs
on grounds of corruption and in-
competence. Among them was Lt.
Col. Phan Van Khoa, chief of
Thua Thien,.Province and mayor
of Hue.
Khta has been accused by both
U.S. and South Vietnamese offi-
cials of acting too slow tb bring
civil order to Hue after the Com-
munists launched their lunar new
year attack there.
onsoon clouding limited U.S.
air strikes against North Vietnam
Sunday but a North Vietnamese
broadcast said American planes
returned Monday and two were
shot down. It said one was downed
35 miles southwest of Hanoi and
the other in Quang Binh Province
near the Red Chinese border.

1
J
I
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7
a
7
1
1
1
I

cover virtually all housing units merce or teach how to make and
with two exceptions:' use firearms, explosives or incen-
-Owner occupied, single family diary devices in riots.
dwellings sold or rented without Southern senators, who staged
the aid of a real estate broker or a seven week filibuster against the
agent. The exemption would be bill before the debate was cut off
forfeited if the owner engaged on a fourth and final try, took the
in discriminatory advertising of position that antiriot and, other
his property, such as putting a amendments had made the com-
"Whites Only" sign on his lawn, promise measure more palatable.
Attorneys Permitted There was no effort to forestall the
The use of attorneys, escrow final vote yesterday.
agents, title companies or other House leaders have indicated
professional assistance necessary they may try to pass the Senate
to perfect or transfer title would bill as it israther than risk a pos-
be permitted. sible stalemate by'sending it to
-Boarding houses or other a Senate-House conference com-
dwellings with not more than four mittee for adjustment of differ-
family units, one of which is oc- ences.
cupied by the owner.
Exemptions also are provided
for religious organizations and
private clubs that provide rooms orl G
for members on a non-commercia
basis. S l ,f*
Single family dwellings may be
exempted even if not occupied by
the owner if he does not own @ 01 8
more than three homes aad does
not sell more than one of them ~ i n s e
in a two year period.
Hart Praises Senate LONDON (R) - The gold rush
Sen. Philip A. Hart, (D-Mich.) (, subsided on the Londop market
floor manager of the bill, praised yesterday following the announce-
fellow senators for backing the ment by the seven nation gold
nation's first federal ban on hous- aoote
ing discrimination . despite mail at $35 an ounce. But on the Zur-
running heavily against it. ich market the initial demand ap-
Hart said he knew colleagues peared to be ony slightly below
"who would have been politically that of Friday.
crep awa toa quet eathand Issued after a private meeting
crept away to a quiet death and at the Bank for International Set-
yoe whomvotaedftetivehandtlements in Basel, Switzerland, a
more coorab kif th communique reaffirmed the deter
flourishing."
The bill would also establish mination of the seven govern-
fedeal pnalies angng u toments to continue selling gold at
federal penalties ranging up to $35 an ounce.
$10,000 fine and 10 years imprison- F35 snnoZnce.
ment for interfering by force or Fais In Zurich
threats with the right to vote, One Zurich banker said the gold
serve on juries, use public ac- pool's announeement "does not
comodiations, attend. p u b ic seem to have had the desired ef-
or engage in other specificaly pro- ts far as we can judgeat
tectedactitties.ould make it a The gold barometer of confi-
federal crime to cross a state line dene m the dollar has been show-
with intent to incite a riot; to ing storm signals since March 1.
obstruct firemen and policemen London market reached panic
engaged in suppressing a riot, or proportions, 60 to 80 tons. Norm-
to transport in interestate comr- ally only 4 or 5 tons are traded
in a day.
At the daily gold fixing yester-
day in London, at which represent-
tives of the major dealers balance
j the demand for gold against the
TEL AVIV - Israeli troops will supply and set the price, turn-
continue to blow up houses in over of less than 10 tons was
occupied territory if it is proved anticipated.
they are used for sabotage opera- Dealers said that despite the
tions, the Defense Ministry de- drop in demand for gold, there
clared Monday. One house blown was no active selling by specu-
up last week was that of a sus- lators who have built up hoards
pected saboteur. .of the metal since the devaluation
Aeof the pound in November.
.A spokesman asserted the prac- Action Sufficient
tice did not violate the Geneva The consensus among London
convention, and that under emer- dealers was that the gold pool's
gency security regulations promul- dation was sufiit tgoldhalse
gated by the British in 1945, blow- c aors but was not far reaching
ng up houses that harbored sabo- enough to shake out sellers yet.
teurs and weapons was permissible. Frankfurt banks report the de-
* * * mand for gold there had subsided
CAPE TOWN, South Africa - but pointed out that Monday is
Dr. B. N. Nel said Monday night normally a quiet day for gold
there is "every possibility" that trading.
heart transplant patient Louis "We expect to get a better idea
Blaiberg will be sent home from of the trend at midweek," a spokes-
Groote Schurr Hospital after Dr. man for one leading German
Christian Barnard returns from bank said.
an American tour Wednesday. Nel The Frankfurt dealers reported
is the hospital's assistant medical both the U.S. dollar and the pound
superintendent. showed slight improvement.

I. 5

There was no confirmation of
this from the U.S. Command in
Saigon.
U.S. B52 bombers were on the
wing again over South Vietnam's
two northernmost provinces, strik-
ing at suspected enemy positions
around Hue and Khe Sanh. They
also bombed positions 12 miles
northwest of Dak To near the
Cambodian border 25 miles north-
west of Saigon.
In a delayed report, the U.S.
Command said American gunship
helicopters spotted a. Communist
convoy of eight trucks 15 miles
southwest of Hue Friday and de-
stroyed all of them with rocket
and machine gun fire.

S
eigr
afte
bas
Mo
the
war
-H
to
on
rela

World New,
By The Associated Press
TOCKHOLM, Seweden - For-,
n Minister Torsten Nilsson said,
er a meeting with U.S. Am-
sador William W. Heath on
nday the views of Sweden and
United States on the Vietnam
are "irreconcilable at present."
[eath has been summoned back
Washington for consultations
deterioration in U.S.-Sweden'
itions over the war.

BLOCK SA
THIS THURS. & FRI.

AL

S

Hill Aud.
Box Office

1
1
i

MUSICAL S OCIEY

I

.!fuluIDI

Between the Hours of 8 A.M. & 4 P.M.
THE MICHIGAN MEN'S GLEE, CLUB

.m

NR TAT N
p ESENTTONS
75th Annual
ANN ARBOR

I

MI

I

PRESENTS:
SPRING
CONCERT
MARCH 23rd
Hill Auditorium-8:30 P.M.

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,; f is{::t^ii}iii :;:' :+;:!ii'': :"?

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SPU-Resistance
invites you to a coffee hour discussion:
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU
LOSE YOUR Il-S.?

THE PHILADELPHIA
ORCHESTRA
AT ALL CONCERTS

SATURDAY, APRIL 20, 8:30
EEUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor, AN,
THONY di BONAVENTURA, Pianist, per-
forms Bartok Concerto No. 2 for Piano
and Orchestra. "Egmont" Overture (Bee-
thoven) and Symphony No. 1 (Brahms).
SUNDAY, APRIL 21, 2:30
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor. CLAUDE
FRANK, Pianist, performs Mozart Con-
certo, K. 456. Honegger's King David
with UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION;
JUDITH RASKIN, Soprano; JEAN SAN-
DERS, Contralto; LEOPOLD SIMONEAU,
Tenor; and THEODOR UPPMAN, Bari-
tone.
SUNDAY, APRIL 21, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. All
Russian program: "Fireworks" (Stravin-
sy); Symphony No. 3 in A minor, Op.
44 (Rachmaninoff); Symphony No. 5
(Shostakovich).
MONDAY, APRIL 22, 8:30
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor. JUDITH
RASKIN, Soprano, sings Mozart's "Exul-
tate Jubilate"; and performs with THE-
ODOR UJPPMAN, Blaitone, and THE
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION, in
Brahms' Requiem.
TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. El-

Tuesdays

8 P.M.

CANADA: IMMIGRATION
& INFORMATION

Wednesdays

8 P.M.

Resistance & Noncooperation

Thursdays

8 P.M.

GUILD HOUSE (basement)
802 MONROE
WORKSHOP ON PRISONS

E

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