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March 12, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-12

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'The Who': Don't Knock the Rock
By BOB WINSHALL To br
Shades of McLuhan - last weekend, The Who, whose medium developed
is rock-and-roll and whose message is violence, played to a capa- a good on
city audience at the Grande Ballroom in Detroit. Apparently, but only
people are really appreciating the message, or are too rich to care; have close
the Grande was filled to capacity at $4.50 a head. with a goo
Reflecting the vagaries of the rock world, The Who in many Their
ways are innovators who somehow have become overshadowed by spoof on
the psychedelic'groups, the blues groups and the soul groups. In the first i
fact, Th'e Who are supposed to have been the first group to use and discii
feedback, and they are the pioneers in the type of instrument- traditiona
destruction later popularized by the Yardbirds in "Blow-Up." and so for
The group is more than just violence, however, although this more tha
seemed the primary reason why many of the people came to see The r
them. Their music is clear and clean, with a heavy beat and ex- crowd has
ceptionally good vocals, both solo and harmony. Their repertoire will be th
was essentially straight rock, although they did include their en masse
multi-song operetta, "A Quick One While He's Away." to play "
Unlike many new groups, which only play their own compo- the song,
sitions or borrow only the latest pieces, The Who played "Shakin' lence that
All Over" and "Summertime Blues" - two oldies. "Can't Ex- As th
plain", "Boris the Spider" and "Happy Jack" were some of the to really u
original compositions. toward th
They really do make the audience want to groove with the air and cE
music. Peter Townshend, the- lead guitarist, and Roger Daltry, bounces. Z
vocal, move around the stage, with Townshend characteristically Daltry pu
hit-strumming his guitar and contorting his body, then straight- against th
ening up. His pitcher's-windup strum, a gesture familiar to fol- mike thro
lowers of Jimi Hendrix, is a particularly dynamic gambit. Keith in a bassc
Moon, the drummer, flashily twirls his sticks, raising high our
of his seat for dramatic emphasis. Nears
The general feeling that you get from The Who is thathis bass of
s this is a group that really enjoys and is involved in what they
are doing (or they are pretty good actors). This attitude is Was it
Daily-Andy sacks contagious, making the audience -more receptive and causing them Was it a3
to become more involved in listening, or dancing, or however they destruction
Peter Townshend: Hot Damn!!! choose to appreciate The Who. worth $4.5

-- Smash It

eak the bubble of any misconceptions which may have
from this article so far, The Who are a rock group -
e, in terms of musical quality and dramatic impact -
a rock group. Listening to them Saturday night, I could
ed my eyes and imagined myself at a TG or mixer'
d local group.
newest album. "The Who Sell Out," is an enjoyable
commercial radio, and their operetta may be one of
n a wave of attempts to adapt rock to new techniques
Alines such as drama (e.g., "Hair"), Eastern music and
J church music (The Electric Prunes' "Mass in F Minor")
rth. Nevertheless, in person they came across as nothing
a good, flashy rock band - with a show.
real show starts when Daltry gives the cue that the
been waiting for, informing us that the next number
e last. Like conditioned animals, the crowd stands up"
to try to catch a glimpse of the act. The Who begins
My Generation," their usual finale. Midway through
smoke bursts appear on stage, foreshadowing the vio-
t is soon to come.
e song enters the instrumental break, Townshend starts
work out his guitar, hitting it against his knee, running
e amps for feedback, throwing the instrument into the
,tching it - except once, when it hits the floor and
The light' show and the smoke add to the confusion.
ts his mike beneath a bass drum and then rubs it
he cymbals; Townshend nudges his guitar against the
ws it into the air, and swings it like a club; Moon kicks
drum, knocks over his remaining drums and stands up.
the stage, the crowd, which has been repeatedly warned
h the stage, rushes the stage. Finally, Entwhistle takes
f of his neck, throws it down and the show ends.
t music? Yes. Was it good music? Yes, for straight rock.
good show? Well, if you were -close and could see the
n or were far away and could dance, yes. But was it
0? No.

r "
r r
Thompsons PIZZA
THIS cOUPON IS GOOD FOR
O C 0.
r r
-off 50c off-I
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ON A MEDIUM OR LARGE ONE ITEM
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COUPON Is Good Only Monday thru Thursday, u
March 11 thru 14
--

the emu players series
THE PLOUGH
AND
THE, STARS
A revolt of Irish Humor and Hatred

march 13-17
all seats $1.50

quirk auditorium
reservations: 482-3453

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4

ACADEMY
AWARD
NOMINATIONS...

Film Festival 'A Moving Success'

3020 Washtenaw. Ph. 434-1782
BETWEEN ANN ARBOR

Show Time: Wednesday &
Saturday & Sunday
1 :00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
Monday-Tuesday;
Thursday-Friday 7 & 9
AND YPSILANTI

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See Feature at f 1 :00-3:00-5:00-7:05-9:10
wednesday Afternoon Dial NO 2-6264
isL DIES' DAY
om 1P.M. to 6 P.M.
Dial NO 2-6264
Coming Next: "COP-OUT" -

4,

By BARBARA HOCHMAN
First of Two Parts
The "announcement of the win-
ners' and showings of some win-
ning films brought the Sixth An-
nual. Ann- Arbor Film Super-Fes-
tival to a moving close Sunday
night.
A record number of over 200
films were received . by festival
director Prof. George Manupelli,
and over 100 were shown to the
judges and swarms of audiences
during a four-day period. $910
was distributed to the makers of
the :wnnilng films, including lo-
cally sponsored awards to Uni-
versity students Andrew Lugg (for
"The Billard Slum"), Bill Clark
and Hillary Hicks (for "Opus 1"),
Alan Wurtzel and Lynn Brown
(for "What's It About"), Alan
Finnera'n (for "Areas: A Theatre
Piece").
The judges' unanimous choice
for the $300 first prize went to
San Franciscan William Hindle's
"Chinese Firedrill," a 24-minute
color film very difficult to de-,
scribe With words.
-Beside the official ."winners,
about 40 .select films will travel
the route of the ."festival tour,"
making 15 stops for further judg-
ing and awards. With the help of
film distributing manager Mike
Getz, they will .be screened at 17
Art Theatres throughout the
country. They will also be broad-
cast on television station KQED,
San Francisco (where prizewinner

Hindle is film director), and those
which survive the Yale University
judging will be presented at the
Museum of Modern Art. In total,
the awards and payments to these
independent film-makers ap-
proaches $16,000, making the Ann
Arbor Festival the world's rich-
est film competition. -
The festival was first conceived
and organized by Prof. Manupelli
to encourage and to help, or re-
ward financially, the small-time
film maker. Now, with the in-
creasing use of the film medium
as an artistic expression, the fes-
tival has grown in many aspects.
The judges themselves claim
that the quality of submitted
films was much better than ever
before. New film-makers dis-
played hopeful potential, while
those more, established, who had
entered the festival previously,
maintained their creativity.
What kind of films are shown
at such a demonstration, and how
are they appraised? All films en-
tered were 16mm, ranging from
50 seconds to 30 minutes long;
averaging about six minutes. They
were in color as well as black and
white, and were generally accom-
panied by sound tracks. They
were made mostly by young peo-
ple, some of whom are film stu-
dents, and they derived primarily
from San Francisco and New
York. (Twelve Ann Arbor people
submitted films.)

There is no doubt but that the
whole festival not only represent-
ed, but was, a significant art era.
Further, as it is said film festi-
vals tend to do, this one played
a theme, and in doing so, became
h i s t o r i c a I11 y significant. That
theme was man - the personal,
subjective, perplexed individual.
To say this may ring of a hack-
neyed sound, but yet the mood
and means of expression of al-
most every film shown was some
kind of turning inward to look at
ourselves.
There were some outright "doc-
umentaries" of how people are
living today, and there were little;

plots which played with time and
space distortion. Many films
showed people "doing their thing,"
whatever it might be, nude, with
the audience-accepted under-
standing of "yes, this is how peo-
ple really are, underneath it all."
The judges say that they were
looking for accomplishment, orig-
inality, for innovation in the use
of picture and sound, for the ger-
minating artist. And they were
impressed by the techniques and
the "nowness," the sense of "this
is the present day portrayed" in
what they saw.
Tomorrow: A Look at
Some of the Films

O4

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BIZARRE

LA SOCIEDAD HISPANICA

LOSOVDAS
(THE YOUNG and THE DAMNED)
SPANISH - ENGLISH SUBTITLES
Wednesday, March 13, 8:00 P.M.
Auditorium A, Angell Hall, 75c

FRIDAY, SATURDAY-MARCH 15, 16
HARBOR LIGHTS,

presents

JIM KWSI

SATURDAY, MARCH 16
8:30P.M.-

.Shows at 1:00 - 3:30 - 6:15 - 9:00
Feature at 1:15 - 3:50 - 6:30 - 915

JUG BAND

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Tickets:

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LAST 2 DAYS TO SEE-7:00-9:15
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Erotic scenes of such outright beauty, 6 E
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DETROIT VIBRATIONS
Only 25min. from Ann Arbor at,
4195 W. Jefferson at Outer Drive
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ENDING
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OPEN 7:30-1:30

Truman Capote's
IN COLD BLOOD
is 'EXCELLENT! SENDS
SHIVERS DOWN THE SPINE!
THE FILM IS ELECTRIFYING!
IT LEAVES ONE CHILLED!"
-Bosley Crowther, New York Times

Call for Reservations
386-2599

Admit one FREE with this ad
and one paid admission

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"THE FIRST
REALLY FINE
MOVE OF
THE YEAR!"
-N.Y. Times

"ONE YOU
WON'T
SOON
FORGET!"

ST.ARtTS THURSDAY
"ONE OF THE CLOSELY
YEAR'S10 WATCHED
BEST FILMS!" TRAINS
Crowthr. Tes *-Geimis, Newsday
Wolf, Cue. Winston, Post
Morgenstern, Newsweek Thursday - 7:00 - 9:15
Ipert&lKnight, Saturday Review Fri-Sat. - 3-5-7-9:15-11:20

.

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UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
Department of Speech
in Co-operation with
The Department of English

" "

I

WwINNER
I ACADEMY
AWARD
NOMI NATIONS!
" BEST PICTURE
0 BEST ACTOR DUSTIN HOFFMAN
" BEST ACTRESS ANNE BANCROFT
JOSEPHELEVINE * BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
MIKE NICHOLS KATHERINE ROSS
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Starting Thursday We Will
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"Perhaps the most beautiful movie in history."-
Brendan Gill, The 'New Yorker: e"Exquisite is only the
first word that surges in my mind as an appropriate
description of this exceptional film. Its color is abso-
lutely gorgeous. The use of .music and, equally elo-
quent, of silences and sounds is beyond verbal descrip-
tion. The performances are perfect -that is the only
word" Bosley Crowther, New York Times."AMay well
be the most beautiful film ever made."-Newsweek.
}
:'

-N.Y. Post

4

) r e s e i t

JUDE

KIDS' BENEFIT (ONCERT-'68
TUESDAY, March 26-8:30 P.M.
CANTERBURY HOUSE, 330 Maynard

A Dark Comedy of DISSENT
-Winner of the 1967 Hopwood Award

BLUES-ROCK-JAZl

Wednesday-Saturday

I HELP SUPPORT THE I

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