100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 06, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

cinema-
Festival Flicks into View Tonight

Wilder, Ke

By ELLEN FRANK
They let you smoke at Cinema
Guild during the Ann Arbor Film
Festival. At least, the ushers say,
"there is too much going on to
take care of things like that." As
the largest experimental film
festival in the world, there is in-
deed 'a lot. going on, offering one
of the few chances the independ-
ent film maker has to have his
films shown - and perhaps win
some money for them.
The Cinema Guild - Dramatic
Arts Center sponsored film festival
was begun six years ago by Prof.
George Manupelli of the archite-
ture school. The Festival has since
become a product of Cinema
Guild's finances and facilities,
cooperating with the Dramatic
Arts Center in expense of time and
energy. But it remains an event
produced by the stamina of George
Manupelli. Local film maker An-'
drew Lugg is very correct in say-
ing, "The Festival wouldn't hap-
pen without him."
This year there are over 200 en-!
tries in the Festival competition.
"many, many more than ever be-
fore." About half of these films
will be shown in the public screen-
ings Wednesday through Saturday
in the Architecture Aud. There will
also be a special Saturday matinee
at 2:00 p.m., with the winning en-
tries shown Sunday night at 7:00,
9:00 and 11:00.
Festival judges this year are
Prof. Winn Cortez of Eastern
Michigan University; Michael Ve-
nezia, sculptor-painter from Ann
Arbor; Ann Wehrer, a member of!
the Dramatic Arts Center (and
star of Andy Warhol's latest film,
"Bike Boy"); and Prof. Samia
Halaby- of the architecture school.
Ron Nameth, Chairman of the
Awards Jury,.teaches at.the Uni-
versity of Illinois. His films, some
of which are past Festival win-
ners, include Upper U.S., Requiem,
Exploding Plastic Inevitable and
the Velvet Underground.
Some promising highlights of
this year's Festival are several
works of local film makers. Ann
Arbor entries have come from Eric
Brown, Jay Cassidy, Andrew Lugg
and Richard Ayers, Michael Stern
(entering for Mike Mature Pro-
ductions), Alan Wurtzel and Lynn
Brown, and Bill Clark.
Past Festival winners Bruce
Baillie, Andrew Meyer and Rich-
ard Meyer have entered again this
year.
A host of other events have
grown out of this year's Festival.
Canterbury House is presenting
a Festival of Local 8 Millimeter
Films (allentries In the Ann Arbor
Film Festival itself are 16 mm).
Screenings are at midnight tonight
and tomorrow. Winners will be
shown at 5:00 p.m. on Sunday in
Architecture Aud.
At the Festival, local producer
Andrew Lugg will be circulating
a petition condemning the dis-
missal of Henri Langlois as head
of the Cinematheque Francaise
in Paris. The petition will be sent
to the French newspapers and
Andre Malraux, France's cultural
minister.
Langlois has made the Cine-

Top Book.
NEW YORK VP)-"The Eighth
Day," a mystery novel by Thorn-
ton Wilder, has been judged the
most distinguished fiction by an
American writer in 1967 in the!
19th annual National Book
Awards competition.
The awards in fiction and fivet
other categories, which come with
a cash prize of $1,000 each, will
be presented in a ceremony in
Philharmonic Hall at Lincoln Cen-1
ter tonight. The awards were made
public Monday night.
In addition to the 75 year old
Wilder, winners in other categories
were:
History and biography-George!
F. Kennan, "Memoirs, 1925-1950."
Science, philosophy and religion
-Jonathan Kozol, "Death at an!
Early Age."
Arts and letters-the late Wil-
liam Troy, "Selected Essays."
Poetry-Robert Bly, "The Light
Around the Body."

.1

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
.ininmmmmmmmmmmmm~~mmmmmmmmmmmminmmm mammam
nuan Win
Thompson s PIZZA
Awards TH IS COUPON IS GOOD FOR
Translation-Howard and Edna -off 50C off-I
Hong for their translation of O DIlsMO AGuOEIE
Soren Kierkegaard's Journals and ON A ME D(M OR LARGE ONE ITEM
Papers, Vol. 1. (Ok MORE) P I ZZA
Two of the winners said they U
will donate their prize money to COUPON Is Good Only Monday thru Wednesday,
causes in which they are inte- Feb. 26-28
rested. ««sr....««.............................«.,...
A statement issued in behalf of
Bly by his publisher, Harper and 4
Row, said he will donate his prize
to the peace movement. Two years
ago, Bly was a cofounder of Amer- 1 1
ican Writers Against the Vietnam
War. HELDc Mon. thru Thurs.-7:00-9:1 5
Kozol, whose publisher was L OVER Fri., Sat., Sun-3- 57-9:5
Houghton-Mifflin, said he will
give his prize to "the community "BEST FOREIGN FILM"
leaders of the Boston ghetto."" ESFOIGF LM
The prize for Kennan's book, -N.Y Film Critic'sAward
published by Little Brown, was his
second National Book Award prize.
He won in 1957 with "Russia "A TRIUMPH AND A THRILLER.
Leaves the War." Erotic scenes of such outright beauty,
Prof. Donald Hall of the English such superb subtlety. A great film
department was one of three that boasts Chills
judges in the poetry division.tthrllls,
beautiful women. An outstanding _
film for our time." .F ra a r

4

A HOOT-
with the Carbondale Ch
Band), Pamela and Mic
Sara, Grady Tuck, and man

TONIGHT at
amber Orchestra (Jug
hael, Christopher and
y others.

CARY GRANT-RAYMOND MASSEY-PETER LORRE
"ARSENIC AND OLD LACE"
Theatre will be cleared at 11:15
LATE SHOW--Fri. & Sat.--1 1:30 P.M. Only

-Judih Ci?, WiT

THURSDAY-Ashok Talwar-singing classical 1421 Hill St.
and popular Indian music 8:30 P.M.
playing the Tamboura
Neera Agarwal-playing the Sitar
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
THREE ON A MATCH
a folk-rock trio from Rochester, New York (presently negotiating
for National songwriting and recording contracts) returning by over-
whelming popular request to sing popular and ORIGINAL folk-rock
music.

i

-Daily--Bernie Baker

matheque into the world's major
film center with a collection of
60,000 films (the Museum of Mod-
ern Art, America's biggest film li-
brary, has 7500 films). Directors
all over the world have protested
Langlois' dismissal by recalling
their films from the collection.
French film directors have band-
ed together in protest as "Les
Enfants du Cinematheque Fran-
caise." The group, which includes
Godard, Varda and Truffaut,
plans to lead a boycott when the
Cinematheque is reopened with its
new chairman.
Lugg says the "Ann Arbor Film
Festival, as the world's largest
experimental film festival, should
make it known that it deplores
film' horror stories wherever they
occur. It is important to support
the protest of Langlois' dismissal

and the reorganization of the
Cinematheque."
During the Film Festival, reser-
vations will be taken for Jean-Luc
Godard's upcoming lecture at the
Vth Forum Theatre, scheduled for
March 18.
Music for the Festival will be
provided Thursday night by the
John Miller Jazz Trio and Friday
and Saturday nights by the Prime
Movers.
Following the Festival, the
films will go on a year-long tour,
stopping at 14 universities, 18
theatres, the Museum of Modern
Art and television station KQED
in San Francisco. Those films on
tour receive a minimum financial
guarantee for each stop and are
eligible for prizes. Over $7,000 in
prizes will be given during the
tour.

S

ENDING THURSDAY

Ends Thursday
The "DARLING" of
"DOCTOR ZH IVAGO"

Ann Wehrer of the Dramatic
Arts Center explains that "most
people use the Ann Arbor Film
Festival because it gets the big-
gest crack at the largest number
of films - it's easier and more
varied than setting up individual
festivals."
Those that do use- the Ann
Arbor Festival, in theatres from
Youngstown, Ohio, to Tempe,
Arizona, often adopt a hybrid
name for the imported, but locally
sponsored, show. In Berkeley, it's
called "The Berkeley-Ann Arbor-
University of California-Centenn-
ial Experimental Film Festival."
University Charter
Caledonian Airways
FLY TO
LONDON
from
DETROIT
$230 Roundtrip
May 20 to Aug. 19
Also, Wait Lists For:
May 9to June 19
June 27 to Aug. 22
CALL: 761-2348
5-7 P.M.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

l Z.1

CANNES FESTIVAL AWARD

I

1

BEST ACTRESS
VANESSA REDGRAVE
"Her ex-liusband bugs her bedroom, dynamites her
mother, and climbs into a gorrilla suit to turn her wed-
ding party into a King Kong-sized disaster. Through-
out it all, she remains radiant and ripe, a plum with
aplomb that drove the critics wild."-Time Magazine

TODAY ONLY

WwINNER
I ACADEMY
AWAR*D
NOMI NATIONS!
* BEST PICTURE
* BEST ACTOR DUSTIN HOFFMAN
0 BEST ACTRESS ANNE BANCROFT
PHE.LEVINE * BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
MIKE NICHOLS KATH ER INE ROSS
LAWRENCE TURMAN, BEST DIRECTOR
pv 7MIKE NICHOLS
e PBEST SCREEN
f CINEMA-
- TOGRAPHY
gIgUN.GARFUNKEL INENCE TURMAN
MIE NICHOLS TECHNICOLOR* PANAVS10N'
THE T
GA DUNL9EE COATE O
5th BACRFLODSTIRNTHOFANT ATRIE OS
Oi 6S VILLME n.-Thurs.
375 No. MAPLE RD.."769.1300 __7_00____9_00
090 :00 SAT. 3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00-11:00
FRI. 7:0-9SUN. 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00

4

OV

meets the "GEORGY GIRL"
BOY in the LOVE STORY
of the YEAR!
LIE CHRISTIE TERENCE STAMP
PETER FINCH
ALANBATES

MORGAN!

Special Request Booking !

KLH
Now in Stock ...
Model 27 Receiver
Model 11 FM on SALE
HI Fl STUDIO
121 West Washington
Ph. 668-7942

F

FRIDAY
TRUMAN CAPOTE'S
"IN COLD BLOOD"

"HOWLINGLY FUNNY"
-Bosley Crowther, New York Times
"HILARIOUS"
-Time Magazine

11

f

F.

I

Ii

I

Today is LADIES' DAY
ATTHE
NOMINATED FOR ACADEMY
10 AWARDS
Including * Best Picture
/ ;
U H E.C

"BRILLIANT"
-Brendan Gill, The New Yorker
STARTS THURSDAY: "CHARLIE BUBBLES"

COURSE

EVALUATION

See Feature at * 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:10-9:20
6 THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND DEPARTMENT OF ART
PRESENT SMETANA'S COMIC OPERA
"THE BARTERED BRIDE"
(English Translation by Josef Blatt)
March 21-24, 8:00 P.M...
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
All Tickets-$3.00
Mail orders accepted now. Make checks payable to "University of Michigan." Send

FIL FETVAL
WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 6-10
Presented in cooperation with the DRAMATIC
ARTS CENTER of Ann Arbor. Over $900
in awards. Over 175 films in competition.
There will be two completely different shows each night, Wednesday-Satur-
day. On Sunday, there will be two showings of the prize winners. Individual
tickets may be purchased before each showing; series tickets, which include

i

I

On Washtenaw between Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti
THE ALL-NEW AND MOST EXCITING..TRUI -LIE 3
ADVENTURE.
WAYSIDE BIG SCREEN-FULL COLOR
THEATRE
.E
THRILL
.. on a trail of

PRESENTS
119i
...Ru w Staa S opt~us &

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan