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March 06, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-06

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Wednesday, March 6, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

SOLO CAMPAIGNER: *
__________eWViet Cong
SNixon Pledges End to Viet War; Repulsed

t

Anti-Riot

Amendments

U.S. Withdrawal Not Suggested

At Ca Man

By The Associated Press]
HAMPTON, N.H.-Former Vice
President Richard M. Nixon, a
solo Republican campaigner for
the nation's opening presidentiala
primary, pledged anew yesterday1
that a GOP administration would:
end the war in Vietnam.
Nixon staged one of his more'
energetic campaign days, a five
town sprint, urging the voters to
turn out for the primary on March
12.
Michigan Gov. George Romney,
once his chief rival, has withdrawn
as a candidate, although his name;
will still be listed on the New

Hampshire ballot. There is a write
in campaign under way for New
York Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller
nd the Nixon forces appeared con-
cerned lest disinterest hold down
the GOP turnout.
-Basement
"The nation will be watching
you March 12," Nixon told about
100 people in the basement of an
Exeter restaurant. "As New Hamp-
shire goes so will America go in
November."
Some 200 people packed the
American Legion hall in Hampton,
and heard Nixon pledge to end the
war. He said President Johnson

had the power to do that, but 300-Man Battalion
"never has so much power been Loses 195 Troops;
used less effectively." Shelling Continues
"If they had followed the ad- g
vice we have given the war would; SAIGON (M)-The Communists
be over now," Nixon said. "I hope varied widespread shelling yester-
they will adopt more effective day with a costly infantry attack
policies bewteen now and Novem- on Ca Mau, a provincial capital
ber." of 40,000 near the southern tip of
Leadership Vietnam.
"But, my friends, if in Novem- Military spokesmen said govern-
ber this war is not over after all of ment troops, fighter bombers, heli-
this power has been at their dis- copter gunships and artillery kill-
Sposal, then I say that the Amer- ed 195 Viet Cong in routing a 300
ican people will be justified to man battalion that drove into Ca
elect new leadership and I pledge Mau behind a barrage of mortar
to you the new leadership will end and recoilless rifle shells in early
the war and win the peace in the morning darkness and temporarily
Pacific and that is what America occupied the provincial hospital.
wants." d Sampan
Nixon had made much the same Five of the enemy were captured
pledge Feb. 28 when he said that in the 15 hour fight at Ca Mau,
Johnson could end the war by No- also known as Quang Long, 153
vember. miles southwest of Saigon. The

Added to Civil Rights Bill

Bargaining Progresses
In Long Copper Strike

0 WASHINGTON (P)-Bargaining
prospects reportedly brightened
yesterday for two major copper
firms in White House efforts to
settle the longest copper industry
strike in the nation's history.
But negotiators for 26 striking
unions were taking a tougher stance
with the two other giants of the
industry in sticking to demands
for companywide bargaining, in-
formed sources said.
The unions' demands for com-
panywide bargaining and the in-
dustry's refusal is the main issue
that has blocked talks on wages
and fringe benefits and dragged
Navy Removes
Stricken Oiler
SAN JUAN, P.R. (P) - A team
of six U.S. Navy vessels began
trying yesterday to haul away the
bow section of the ruptured tanker
Ocean Eagle after it oozed more
than a million gallons of crude
oil into San Juan Bay, blacken-
ing 11 miles of beaches and turn-
V ing -the surf coffee brown.
{Three tugs and three salvage
ships nuzzled near the hulk, at-
taching chains as oil still bubbled
into the harbor. An oil boom
pumped out the stern section
which drifted aground near by
and a Coast Guard spokesman
said, "We've got the stern pretty
much under control."
The Navy vessels, under the dir-
ection of Adm. Alfred R. Matter,
the Caribbean commander, plan-
ned to pull the bow to a point
100 miles north of San Juan.

the strike of more than 50,000
workers into its 235th day.
Phelps Dodge Corp. reportedly
was already bargaining in three
separate rooms with the unions in
the executive Office Building next
to the White House.
Normal Pattern
"They are conducting talks in
their normal bargaining pattern,"
with separate negotiations covering
the company's Texas refinery, its
Arizona mines, and its Yonkers,
N.Y., fabricating 'plant, said one
source.
Anaconda Co is bringing in its
35 man negotiating team in ex-
pectation of getting a similar
agreement from the unions for
separate bargaining for different
company operations, the source
said "Bargaining will start today,"
he added.
Resistance
But the unions at one point yes-
terday reportedly were putting up
stiffer resistance to Kennecott
Copper Corp. and American Smel-
ting and Refining Co. on the issue
of giving up companywide bar-
gaining
White House press secretary
George Christian confiried only
that separate talks between the
unions, Kennecott, Phelps Dodge
and American Smelting and Re-
fining Co were under way
President Johnson called the
negotiators here Monday and
warned them that dwindling cop-
per supplies threaten prosperity,
could jeopardize the supply of
weapons for Vietnam and that the
big growth of copper imports
weakens the U.S. dollar in foreign,
trade.

rushn utton
"I do not suggest to you, as'
you've heard in this campaign,
any push button way to do this,"
Nixon said yesterday. "I do not
suggest withdrawal from Vietnam.:
"I am saying to you that it is
possible if we mobilize our econ-
omic and political ladership it
can be ended," he said.
Gov. Ronald Reagan of Cali-
fornia called yesterday for an end
to "bickering and backbiting"
among Republicans which he said
could cost thefn the presidential
election in November.
"The months ahead are too cru-
cial to allow for bickering, and
backbiting among Republicans.
The need for victory is too great.

troops seized a Communist sam-
pan loaded with explosive charges.
Losses among government troops
were described as light. There was
no report on casualties among
civilians, hard hit in previous
phases of the Communists' winter
spring offensive against metro-
politan centers.
Capitals
Striking with long range wea-
pons rather than ground forces,
the Communists shelled a dozen
provincial capitals, seven Amer-
ican and South Vietnamese air
fields, 14 military bases and six
district towns.
Brought under enemy mortar
fire for the time was the giant
$500 million U.S. sea and air sup-
ply base at Cam Ranh Bay, 200
miles northeast of Saigon, which
was visited just last Christmas by
President Johnson and entertainer
Bob Hope.
Invulnerable
The flurry of 15 shells-on Cam
Ranh did no serious damage, but
succeeded in violating one of the
last so called invulnerable U.S. in-
stallations in South Vietnam.
A senior US military source pre-
dicted yesterday that a showdown
battle for Khe Sanh and other
menaced allied positions south of
the demilitarized zone will end in
a Communist defeat.
He pictured allied forces as
about to go on the offensive and
said the massing of four North
Vietnamese divisions, perhaps
60,000-70,000 men including Viet
Cong elements, presents the U.S.
Command with "silver platter" op-
portunities for conventional style
battle in the northern two pro-
vinces.
3 -

:-Associated Press
STUDENTS SURROUND militant Negro leader Ernie Chambers outside Horace Mann Junior High
School following a rock-throwing demonstration. Chambers said disorders yesterday were triggered
by the appearance in Omaha Monday night of former Gov. George Wallace of Alabama.
Police Stop Disorder in Omaha
Negroes Protest Wallace Rally

WASHINGTON ()) - The Jen-
ate nailed an anti-riot provision
into its civil rights bill yesterday
and then refused to exempt in-
dividual home owners from a
ban on discrimination in the sale
or rental of housing.
Over administration protests,
the Senate adopted 82 to 13 an
amendment providing for a five
year prison term and a $10,000
fine for crossing state lines with
intent to start a riot.
Single Family
Then by the narrow margin of
48 to 43 it rejected an amendment
by Sen. Howard H. Baker Jr., (R-
Tenn.), which would have re-
moved about 29 million owner
occupied single family dwellings,
or about 44 per cent of the hous-
ing market, from the anti-discrim-
ination clause.
As now written, the bill provides
that effective Jan. 1, 1970, owner
occupants of single family homes
may not discriminate if they sell
through a real estate. agent or
broker. If they handled the sale
themselves they would be free to
discriminate.
Brokers
Baker proposed that they be
permitted to discriminate, even
when employing an agent, so long
as they did not indicate any ra-
cial preference or intent' to dis-
criminate to the broker.
"The right to discriminate,"
Baker said, "should not depend on
whether the owner employs a
broker."
Sen. Charles H. Percy, (R-IIL),
urging rejection of Baker's pro-
posal, said, "We can't afford pre-
judice and discrimination any
more in this country."
Anti-Riot
The anti-riot amendment was
pressed to adoption by Sens.
Frank J. Lausche, (D-Ohio), and
Strom Thurmond, (R-S.C.) It fol-
lows the general lines of a bill
the house passed 347 to 70 dur-
ing last summer's street violence.
"I do believe," Thurmond said,
"that firm action to punish those
who go into cities and incite riots
will definitely alleviate this press-
ing problem."
Also adopted, 48 to 42, was an
amendment by Sen. Herman E.
Talmadge, (D-Ga.), making it a
federal crime to injure, intimidate
or interfere with a businessman
during a riot.
Not Germane
Vice President Hubert H. Hum-
phrey at first ruled the Lausche-
Thurmond amendment out of
order as not germane to the civil
rights open housing bill.
This brought Lausche to his feet
with the comment that the bill's
purpose is to help bring about
domestic tranquility and prevent
riots, "but now we hear that riots
have nothing to do with it.'
Sen. Philip A. Hart, (D-Mich.),
floor manager for the adminis-
tration backed civil rights mea-/
sure,'pleaded- with the Senate to
wait for President Johnson's ver-
sion of anti-riot legislation.

OMAHA, Neb. (R) - Police re- pelting the speaker's platform
inforcements moved into the tense with sticks, bits of placards, paper
Near North Side yesterday follow- drinking cups and stones.
ing a night and day of disorders Wallace's headquarters in Mont-
that left one Negro teenager dead gomery, Ala., said he would have
and numerous buildings damaged. no comment on the developments,
Rock throwing incidents mul- but as the demonstrators were
tiplied, classrooms emptied and hustled out of the auditorium
one school closed down completely. Monday night Wallace said "These
Tempers are the free speech folks, you
Police assigned four man cruisers know. And these are the kind of
to the Near North Side, where people of this country are sick
most of Omaha's Negroes live. and tired of."
But Nebraska Gov. Norbert Tie- Before the night was over 13
mann said he hopes tempers will persons were injured, one criti-
cool following the departure of cally, and at least 10 businesses
former Alabama Gov. George Wal- I looted or.damaged.
lace from the state. Shot
Ernest Chambers, militant Om- S
aha Negro leader, said the trouble Sixteen year old Howard L.
started when about 50 demonstra- Stevenson was fatally shot by an
tors, mostly young Negroes, were off-duty policeman as the youth
tars motlyyoug Ngros, ereattempted to enter a looted pawn
routed from a Wallace for presi- shopted tetpolceman
dent rlyi mh odyso h ht oiea a
night ray in Omaha Monday b hired to guard m
Police formed a flying wedge One Negro girl demonstrator,
and drove the demonstrators from referring to Wallace, shouted:
the auditorium after they began "You're going to get it, baby. Just
MICHIGAN FRATERNITIES and SORORITIES PRESENT
IF SIN

you wait. You're going to get it
this summer.
". .Nebraska's going to be a
ball of fire this summer. It is
going to be a ball of fire this sum-
summer. It is going to be the
hottest state there is," she scream-
ed.
During the afternoon 50 win-
dows were smashed by rocks and
bricks at Sacred Heart School, the
Rev. Michael McCarthy, pastor,
said. Enrollment at Sacred Heart
is between 30 and 40 per cent
Negro.
Omaha's population of 378,457
includes about 35,000 Negroes, 80
per cent of whom live in the Near
North Side - scene of the 1966
rioting.
"The Tour"
Near Omaha North High School,
which has a large Negro enroll-
ment, Howard Petersen, 57, who
operates a small grocery store, said
about 15 to 20 Negro youths came
into his store, rifled his cash regis-
ter first, "then made the tour,"
smashing bottles of catchup and
other grocery items on the floor.
"They were fighting among
themselves to get to the cash
register," he said.
Omaha Mayor A. V. Sorensen
said the disorders "without ques-
tion widen the gap between the
white and black citizens and only
delay the ultimate equality of cit-
izenship for all people."

Richard Nixon

I

Sy

P0510-

'68

I

I

Presents

New

Moods

of

Dissent

Tickets may-be
purchased at
Hill Auditorium,
on the Diag, and
at the door the night
of the sing.
COST.:ONLY $1.00

-__.

Free Lectures and Panels
MARCH 9 THROUGH MARCH 31

----

I

I

MARCH 9

HILL AUDITORIUM

IN CONCERT
HARPER'S
BIZARRE
Sing FEELIN' GROOVY
HILL AUDITORIUM
MARCH 16
8:30 P.M.
TICKETS $2.0, $2.50,x$.00
BLOCK ORDERS DUE FRIDAY MARCH 8, 5 P.M.
INDIVIDUAL SALES BEGIN MONDAY, MARCH 11
HILL BOX OFFICE OPEN MONDAY - SATURDAY
9 A.M.- 5 P.M.

11

n

Featuring:

Sat., March 9
Sun., March 10
Tues., March 12
Mon., March 18
Thurs., March 21
Sun., March 24
Tues., March 26'
Thurs., March 28

NORMAN MAILER
Co-sponsor Challenge
SAUL ALINSKY
WILLIAM STRINGFELLOW
PRESIDENT FLEMING
Co-sponsor SGC
AN INTERNATIONAL PANEL
LOUIS LOMAX
ARTHUR R. MILLER
CAREY McWILLIAMS

I

Joint Sabbath Service
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
Temple Beth-Emeth
FRIDAY at 8:15 P.M.

I
E
f
3

EI

Synagogue Music of Sixteenth
and Seventeenth Century Italy
Composed by
SOLAMONE ROSSI
Rendered by the
Camerata Hebraica
STEVEN OVITSKY, Director
Attached to the court of Mantua, Italy, from 1587 to
1628 as composer, Solamone Rossi has been described as
one of the major-creative personalities in the early his-
tory of music, and an influence of inestimable signifi-
cance.
nD fl DCDT D rnI A AM

Guild House Endorses for SOC

President:

MARK SCHREIBER

Council:

MIKE DAVIS

CAROL HOLLENSHEAD

MARK MADOSS

E

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