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February 23, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-23

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PAGE TWO

THlE MICHIGEAN DAILY

JF'RtAv- UURTTATV 9 141

....................

I'ii.ill:12, i'L'[SIt ;HICY . 1;Jt 7S

5

_ .. , . . _

-n 1

Dodging the Draft-
Legally

cinema

"A PICTURE OF GREAT POWER.

'The Fear': A Greek Tragedy

By ART GOLDBERG
Liberation News Service
"'low To Stay Out of the Army"
by Conrad Lynn (Grove, $1.25).
Grove Press has just begun dis-
tributing a thin paperback vol-
ume that at first seems over-
priced at $1.25. The book is not
another long-lost erotic master-
. piece. It has only 126 pages and,
worst of all, it was written by a
lawyer.
But this new book may be one
of the more valuable Grove has
distributed in recent years. Its
subtitle is "A Guide to Your
Rights Under the Draft Law." The
author, Conrad Lynn, is a well-
known civil liberties attorney who
has specialized in draft cases
since World War II.
Lynn's intentions are as clear
as the title of his book. From his
wide experience with draft. cases,
Lynn knows where the draft law
is vulnerable and where it is not.
He knows how the draft machin-
ery can be clogged up, and how
and where it can be fought. The
book in effect is a manual on how
to fight the selective service sys-
tem.
Some highly interesting and
generally unknown bits of infor-
mation stand apart from the rest
of the book. For .example, a man
who now applies for conscientious
objector status no longer has to
be a pacifist. He need not even
be a member of an organized re-
ligious group, or prove, a belief'
in a "Supreme Being."
For those who would fight se-
lective service on its own terms,
Lynn points out that no lawyers
are necessary (they are specific-
ally barred) in filing appeals with
state and national appeals boards.
He notes that a case can be tied
up in the draft machinery for as
long as two years, for only the,
cost of postage. The draft boards
must supply-all appeal forms.
Draft resisters are presented
with a variety of suggestions. Fore-
most among these is the advisa-
bility of demanding a jury trial..
Lynn cites one case where two
consecutive juries would not Con-
vict a black~ draft resister even
though all the evidence seemed
to be against hin.
There is an additional reason for
demanding. a jury trial. According
Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico
The Guadalajara Summer School,
a fully accredited University of
Arizona program, conducted in co-
operation with professors from
stanford Ulniverslty, University of
California, ;and Guadalajara, will
offer July 1 to August 10, art, folk-
lore, geography, history, language
and literature courses. Tuition,
board and room is $290. write Prof.
Juan B. Rael, P.O. Box 7227, Stan-
ford, California 94305.
111.

to Lynn, Chief Justice Lumbard of
the Second U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals said last winter that if
every draft objector insisted on a
jury trial, two per cent of the men
called into service could force the
entire federal court system to ai
standstill.
Lynn was the attorney for David
Mitchell, perhaps the original
draft resister. Mitchell refused in-,
duction on grounds of political4
principle, namely that the war in
Vietnam violated the rules for-
mulated. by the Nuremberg Tri-
bunal. Lynn reviews Mitchell's case
and points to it as a classic way in
which the draft should be resisted.
Readers will also find out that
they may be accepted by Canada
as a landed immigrant through the
mail. They need not make a trip
to Canada before applying.
Members of . certain left-wing
political groups will perhaps, be
surprised to know that in some
cities, depending on the local
boards, many of them receive I-Y
deferments. 'These deferments
usually go to members of the
Communist Party, the Progressive1
Labor Party, Youth Against War
and Fascism, and in some cases
SNCC. .
Mon. thru Thur. 7-9; Fri. & Sat.
- RICHARD LEST

By BARBARA HOCKMAN fears, and brings his parents' hat-
"The Fear" (currently at the red upon him. They have a mur-
Campus) was made in Greece by derer on their hands and must
Greeks with Greeks. This is a hope never to be found out.
novelty for us, since the Greek To be really effective, I think,
films we have seen ("Zorba," the movie should penetrate the
"Phaedra," "Never on Sunday," boy's character more than it does.
"The Greek Passion") were all We look at him, but seldom get
"international" in their manage- into him. Moments where we lack
ment and direction, even though either sympathy or empathy be-
they exuded that peculiar Hellen- come ludicrous.
ic spirit. Yet, like a short story with a
This movie was written and di- surprise ending, the film has some
rected by a man named Costas interesting twists. It isn't only a
Manoussakis. His script is of a study of one unfortunate persont
small, tight tragedy that inter- in the company of luckier ones.,
twines typical Greek social prob- In the beginning the emphasis
lenis - as they are found in those
other films - with a couple of
basic human conflicts into a sus-
pense story.
The story is essentially a de-
scription of a sexually frustrated,
utterly introverted young man
who resorts to rape and, conse-I
quently, murder, for the satis- IA
faction he can't find anywhere
else.
In the small farming village
where herlives, discretion is thebNTERN
much too shy even for discretion.
Ironically, he sees his friends,
his sister, and even his father 1
"animalistically" eating the flesh
of forbidden fruit. But his crim- HELS
inal attempt only increases hisjpV1II A
- - - - - - - - -- -

'is on the total household, a cold,I
tense place, where the parents!
have been estranged from each
other since early in their mar-
riage. Their hostile relationship,
which had appeared completely
hopeless, evolves into a relation-
ship of more tender sensibilities
because of the son's act, as if he
were their scapegoat.
Occasionally, Mr. Manoussakis
ovedoes his experimentation with
photographic effect. But he is
clearly trying to coincide the mood
of the story with the type of shot
and the color of shot fusing black
and white).

The Fear', which has been called the
best picture ever made in Greece, by
an Athens critic, still holds its position
as a picture of great power. A tragedy
of sex frustration that strikes you
as eminently logical.
-.Archer Winsten, N.Y. Post
.I ) i,*

For th inostmatuw ofaudiences-
the .most raistc of m0otion picuirs.

Dial 8-6416

Sat. Matinee $1 .50 -;; Eves. & Sun. $1.75

INKI
RMONIC
LA, Conductor
24, 8:30
itorium

Ill

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1 I
1-3-5-7-9-11; Sun. 1-3-5-7-9
HELD OVER.
E k iwkMMof .A '%"

r mIL H A
JORMA PANUI
SAHT., FB.
H ill Aud

lilt

, ow, zMennWW
"WW I1 WITHOUT ITS PANTS ON!"
-Ramparts Magazine
"I WOULD LIKE TO SEE IT 20 TIMES!"
-San Francisco Chronicle
"IT TRULY HURTS WHEN YOU LAUGH!"
-Stewart Klein, WNEW-TV
"QUALITY AND IMPACT!"
-Ellen Frank, Michigan Daily

I1

Program:
A Requiem in
Our Time........E. Rautavaara
Incidental Music to
"Belshazzar's Feast" ...... Sibelius
Scherzo and Forging of the Sampo
from Kalevala Suite ...... Klami
Symphony No. 5 in E minor,
Op. 64 ............ Tchaikovsky
Tickets:
$6.00-$5.58-$5.00-$4.00-$3.00-$2.00
MUNICH
Chamber Orchestra
HANS STADLMAI R, Conductor
THURS., FEB.29,8:30
Rackham Auditorium
Program:
Concert.ino No. 3,
A major. ..........Pergolesi
Concerto for Violin and
Strings...............Stadlmair
Divertimento in B-flat,
KV159 ............Mozart.
Concerto for 3 Violins and String
Orchestra, D major . .. . J. S. Bach
Tickets: $5.00-$4.00-$2.00

11

PPESENTS
National Theatre of Canada
SHAKESPEARE'S
"A Midsummer Night's Dem
with
aa
DOUGLAS RAIN MARTHA HENRY
as Bottom as Titania
Directed by JOHN HIRSCH Designed by LESLIE HURRY
. SOLE U.S. ENGAGEMENT!

A

AprlH 1-6

Mende ssohn Theatre

. LO rYt- - - -
SNEAK PREVIEW SUNDAY 9:00 P.M.

SEATS NOW ON SALE
at PTP Ticket Office, Mendelssohn Theatre

'

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3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor

Starting TODAY

. MICHIGAN

PRICES- Mon., Tues., Wed & Thus. Eves., Sat. Mat.: Orch.: $5.50,
4.56, Bac. $5 0C, 4.00, 3.00.
Fri. & Sut. Eve: Or( h.: $6 00, 5.C, Balc.: $5.50, 4.50, 3.50
Thursday Mannee: Orch.- $, 00, 2.00, Balc.: $4.50, 3.50,2.50

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I

Including: * BEST ACTOR (Warren Beatty) ' BEST PICTURE
BEST ACTRESS (Faye Dunaway) BEST DIRECTOR (Penn)
1 BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS (Estelle Parsons)
TWO BEST SUPPO'RTING ACTOR (Pollard and Hackman)
Uj XL
FAY'SPiB
D%?] DmEr

i

4

CROWDING
THE SCREEN
WITH ITS POWERS
AND PASSIONS...
ONE OF THE
BEST-LOVED OF
ALL LOVE STORIES!
Thomas Hardy's
unforgettable novel
of a woman's
pride and fall.

METRO-GOLDITIAN-AYER RESINTS
A JOSEPH JANNI PRODUCTION

*

JULIE CHRISTIE TERENCE STAMP

U

k

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