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February 23, 1968 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-23

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIMEE

FRID Y, E B R A R Y 23, 968T H E M I ~ i G A N B A I I P G E h R E

Ask $10.4 Billion
For Aid to Cities

AUSTIN, Tex. ()P - President.
Johnson attacked "the crisis of1
the cities" yesterday with a $10.4
billion package of help in the
fields of housing, poverty, tran- 1
sportation and riot insurance.
If the program goes through in'
its entirety, the eventual price tag
might run to $30 or $35 billions,
some officials believe.
Some of the program was new,
some of it old. All of it was pulled
together in a massive, complicated
message to Congress that was!
nearly twice as long as the one the
Preident delivered on the state

American city" and set a goal of
building 26 million new homes and
apartments in 10 years. This, he
said, will meet an enormous na-
tional need.
Six of the 2'6 million homes
would be subsidized by the govern-
ment, in part at least. They would
replace what the President called
"the shameful substandard units
of misery" where more than 20
million Americans live. Private in-
dustry would get inducements to
build the other 20 million units.
'Red-Lining'
OneP facep of the nresidfntia l

| AID STRIKERS:
Longshoremen Vote To Boycott
U.S. Foreign Copper Imports
MIAMI BEACH, Fla. () - A loading or unloading of any cargo Wirtz, whose strike peace ef-
longshoremen's boycott against at those ports. forts were rebuffed earlier by the
multimillion dollar imports of for- Most copper imports have been labor leaders, called on both sides
eign copper was announced yes- coming into U.S. ports from South in the dispute to "stop waltzing
terday in a mounting AFL-CIO America. and return to bargaining."
campaign to aid 60,000 U.S. cop- Wirtz earlier said the federal But Wirtz said there were no
per strikers, government planned no further present federal plans to invoke
"The International Longshore- intervention in the bitter copper an 80-day Taft-Hartley injunc-
men have decided in the interest strike, but a boycott that shut off tion to halt the strike, and no
of helping their fellow trade un- foreign supplies might force the plans to release government cop-
ionists on strike against the cop- Johnson administration's hand. per stockpiles.
per companies to refuse to handle
all imports and exports of copper,
in the United States and Can-
ada," said President Thomas W.O
Gleason of the International rn
Longshoremen's Association.

*

r±es l Ue pC%.±± v t- V1UuZa'± eBu V1ule int..l., ia
of the union last month. program for cities is aimed at "red
Again, Johnson called for boost- lining" practices by which some
ing income taxes through a 10 insurance companies mark off
per cent surcharge, this time on slum areas and refuse to insure
grounds that "soaring interest property and businesses of the res-
rates will cripple the home- idents.
building industry" and the tax Johnson called for companies
boost will help prevent this because and states to set up pooling ar-
it is anti-inflationary. rangements to spread the risks for
Johnson also asked Congress for individual companies, backed by a
a new housing and urban develop- congressionally chartered corpo-
ment act that would write "a ration to provide reinsurance. The
charter of renewed hope for the companies would pay 2 per cent of
--- --~_ -- Itheir premiums to the corporation.
The insurance project is in line
Pentagon To with recommendations of a special
panel of the President's commis-
sion on causes and cures of riots.
Part of the plan to help cities
is getting Congress to appropriate
the full $2.18 billion it already has
authorized for the anti-poverty
Proceedings program in the 1969 fiscal year.
That would be up $41 million
WASHINGTON (R) -Secretary from the 1968 figure.
of Defense Robert S. McNamara Interest Rates
ordered Pentagon security censors Other features would:
yesterday to clear rapidly his con- 0 Authorize the Federal Hous-
troversial testimony on the 1964 ing Administration to remove its
Gulf of Tonkin incidents for fixed interest rate ceiling.
piompt public disclosure. " Convert the Federal National
Sen. J. W. Fnlbright (D-Ark.), Mortgage Association, from a part
chairman of the Senate Foreign private part governmental opera-
Relations Committee, urged speedy tion into a privately owned cor-.
release of the transcript of Mc- poration.
Namara's give and take with sen- 4 Give a federal guarantee for
ators over the questioned North mortgage bonds issued by mort-
Vietnamese attacks on two U.S. gage banks.
ships. "No single statement or message
The incidents prompted the can embrace the solutions to the
United States to launch reprisal city's problems. No single program,
air attacks on North Vietnamese can attack them.
bases and were a prelude to ma- "No one can say how long it
jor U.S. intervention in Southeast will take, or how, much of our
Asia. - fortune will eventually be com-
McNamara presented a pre- mitted," Johnson said.
pared, 21 page statement to the Spending
Senate panel Tuesday, but Ful- The way the administration adds
bright said dater the defense chief it up,, appropriations and author-
failed to demonstrate that Ameri- izations for spending in the pres-
can ships were attacked Aug. 4, ent 1969 fiscal year starting next
1964. 1 July 1 would reach almost $4.6
As is routine, the transcript of billion.
McNamara's answers to questions But some programs would be
had to be submitted through the set up or are set up for several
security review, process to glean years. Over the next five of them
out information that might be the total would go to $10.4 billion.
valuable to an enemy. And that makes no allowance
McNamara directed that it be for whatever the anti-poverty
sanitized "on an expedited basis." program might cost beyond the
The Pentagon said the tran- 1969 fical year.
script was received at 10 a.m. yes- For that year, the calculations
terday and a team of security re- include $2.18 billion for combat-
view specialists went to work on ting poverty; $1 billion for model
it immediately. city projects.

-Associated Press
SUPPORTED BY U.S. TANKS, Marines advance in a debris-littered area near the Citadel wall in
Hue. Fighter-bombers continued to strafe North Vietnamese-held areas in the ancient city yesterday.
Marines Stom Citadel Walls,

Cut N.

Vietnamese Supply Line,

Copper Imports
Secretary of Labor W. Willardz
Wirtz, here to talk with AFL-CIO
leaders, said earlier that copper
imports amount to $2 million to
$3 million a day since the seven
month old strike halted most U.S.
production.
AFL-CIO President G e o r g e
Meany also announced a major
financial campaign among all
63,000 affiliated locals to "adopt a
copper strike." It is the first'such
effort to enlist virtually the en-
tire labor movement in support of
a strike in some 40 years, Meany
said.
Telegram
Gleason's pledge to boycott all
copper shipments at U.S. East
and Gulf coast ports was made
in a telegram to copper strike
leader Joseph P. Molony.
Gleason, in a boycott against
shipment of U.S. wheat to Russia
several years 'ago, showed the
power of his union to halt the

By The Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE, Fla.-Reports
that Florida teachers were begin-
ning to return to their classrooms
during the fourth day of a state-
wide walkout were called "good
news" yesterday by State School
Supt. Floyd Christian.
But Florida Education Associa-
tion officials said the reports were
"deliberate rumors to try to break
the teachers and frighten them
back."
* * *
LONDON-Prime Minister Har-
old Wilson's government boasted
yesterday Britain soon will be the
strongest military power in allied
Europe and foreshadowed greater
British influence in North At-
lantic Treaty Organization affairs.
A White Paper on defense policy
said the nation's "formidable con-
tribution" to the security of the
Old World will match its drive for,
the political and economic unity of
Europe.

NEW ORLEANS-A U.S. com-
missioner ruled yesterday that the
government had enough evidence
to pursue prosecution of Black
Power leader H. Rap Brown on
charges, he intimidated a Negro
FBI agent by threatening to "get"
him.
"This does not mean I find you
guilty of anything," Commissioner
Fritz Windhorst told Brown at a
preliminary hearing on the
charge. "It merely means the
government has presented evi-
dence showing probable cause."
* * *
MONTGOMERY, Ala. - Gov.
Lurleen Wallace, fighting perhaps
against a third outbreak of cancer,
was stricken early yesterday and
taken to a hospital for emergency
surgery.
An aid said the 41-year-old gov-
ernor, who had undergone two
previous cancer operations in two
years, was suffering fromr "an in-
testinal obstruction."

SAIGON (/R) - U.S. Marinesi
stormed the south wall of the
Citadel in Hue yesterday against1
crumbling enemy resistance while
outside the old imperial city,
American troops cut the supply =
line that has kept the North Viet-,
namese fighting for three weeks.
IIn the air, the. U.S. Command!
reported warplanes for the first
time Wednesday bombed the
Hanoi radio station beaming Com-
munist propaganda from North
Vietnam. But Tokyo reported
Hanoi radio still was broadcast-
ing.
543 Dead
The ferocity of the fighting all
up and down South Vietnam was
reflected by the command's report
that a record number of U.S. sol-
diers-543-were killed in the Feb.
11-17 period. Another 2,547 were
wounded.
In the battle for Hue, a MarineI
spokesman said: "We made a big
break today. Spirits were pretty
high around here."!
As the Marines secured their!
first lodgement on the south wall
of the Citadel, a lance corporal
ran up the Stars and Stripes on
a makeshift staff.I
Heavy Fire3
The Marines fought to within!
about 50 yards of the walled inner
palace grounds under heavy fire
from the 300 or so North Viet-
namese still believed holding out;
in Hue.
Resistance on the outer wall
crumbled when Marines seized a
key tower and killed 15 defenders.I
The North Vietnamese melted
away.j
Associated Press correspondent
George McArthur reported from
Hue that as evidence of weaken-

ing resistance, the North Vietna- greatest triumph was cutting the
mese left behind many rifles and Communist supply line.
two mortars set up for firing.- A U.S. patrol boat was hit in
At the Citadel, AP correspondent the Perfume River that divides the
John Lengel said it appeared that old walled city from southern Hue
about 40 per cent of the Citadel and was badly damaged. The
was in allied hands, with South North Vietnamese also struck a
Vietnamese soldiers heavily en- U.S. landing boat carrying Viet-
gaged. namese refugees with a rocket
Outside the city, a strong force grenadedand several civilians were
from the U.S. Air Cavalry Division wounded.
and the 101st Airborne Division McArthur reported that military
were driving toward the west and sources estimated 4,800 enemy
north walls of the Citadel and troops have been killed in the
were about two miles away. Their ( battle around Hue.

HELD
OVER

IwI ~I

Mon. thru Thur.
7-.9
Fri.-Sat.
1-3-5-7-0-11
Sun.
1-3-5-7-5-10:30

TONIGHT at
"CUSTER'S LAST
BAND" (Jug)
-a massacre in progress

I An I

Saturday-8 P.M. 1421 Hill St.
GLENDA FEARS-opera major 8:30 P.M.
(with Instrumental Ensemble)
singing Negro Spirituals, gospel songs and sacred music-showing
the development of Negro music to the present day.
and
THE VOYAGE OF THE PHOENIX-
A Canadian Broadcasting Co. documentary color film-showing the
humanitarian voyage of the Phoenix to carry medicine to Vietnam.
HORACE CHAMPNEY--(one who was on the voyage) will also be
on hand for questions and discussion. (The film will be shown
at 8 P.M.

RICHARD LESTERt
]Row I-WOIVlE a~
"QUALITY AND IMPACT."
-Ellen Frank, Michigan Daily
"WW 1I WITHOUT IT'S PANTS ON!"
--Ramparts Magazine
"RUNNING-WILD SATIRE!"
-N.Y. Daily News
"I WOULD LIKE TO SEE IT 20 TIMES!"
-San Francisco Chronicle
"IT TRULY HURTS WHEN YOU LAUGH!"
-Stewart Klein, WNEW-TV

MICHAEL CRAWFORD
JOHN (BEATLE) LENNON

SNEAK PREVIEW-SUNDAY 9:00 P.M.
A Brand-New Release, in Color, For Mature Audiences
"HOW I WON THE WAR" follows at 10:20

THIRD
WEEK

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRESM\
FO.AVILLA -
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769.1300

1

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ADVANCE TICKETS: Sat.-Sun. 5:30-7:00 show Saturday only
7:30-9:00 show 9:30-11:00 show

WINNER
7 ACADEMY
AWARD
NOMINATIONS!

I

INCLUDING
* BEST Picture *
* BEST Screen Play *
* BEST Cinema
Tography'*

'7\
iz I

* BEST ACTRESS *
-Anne Bancraft-
* BEST ACTOR *
-Dustin Hoffman-

* BEST SUPPORTING,
-Katharine Ross-
* BEST DIRECTOR *
-Mike Nichols-

ACTRESS *

JOSEPH E LEVINE
MIKE NICHOLS
LAWRENCE TURMAN

I

This is Benjamin.
He's a little worried about his future.

III

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