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February 14, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-14

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PAGE TWO

TAE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1968

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN BAIT A WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 14.. 1~R

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I

dance
Dance Troupe Plans Program

By JAN MALINOWSKI
"Modern dance allows a dancer
self-expression and freedom of
movement, says Adele Moore,,
'71. "Once you learn to choreo-
graph and use an idea, it allows
you to do what you want."
Miss Moore is a member of the
Concert Dance Organization, the
University's resident m o d e r n
dance .group, And on Feb. 23 and
24. the troupe will present its big-
gest program of the year.{
Sub Actor,
Stand sIn
F"or Warhol'
Pop impresario Andy Warhol
has earned considerable notoriety
for the new art forms that he has
introduced in the past, but a ca-
per he engineered at he Univer-
sity of Utah last month shows
that Warhol uses one of man's
oldest arts - a substitution act.
Scheduled to' appear on the
Utah campus to deliver a lecture-
concert as part of a university
series,' Warhol instead sent Uni-
versity of Oregon actor Alan Mid-
gett unannounced in his place and
no one at Utah noticed the dif-
ference. Midgett, according to
Paul Morrisey, Warhol's manager.
Is using the $2600 fee paid by the
Utah administration to go to Eur-
ope to appear in some Italian
films.
Contacted in New York, Warhol'
justified the substitution act on
grounds that "I don't really have
much -to say, so he was better
than I am. . he was what the
people expected. They liked him
better than they would have me
because I have been going on
tours since then, because they
would rather have someone like
that than me."
Elaborating on his client's cry-
ptic statement, Morrisey confirm-
ed the justification. "Andy Warhol
thought that his substitute would
be better for public consumption.
Like a person that was younger
and better and better spoken.
Andy used the medium of the lec-
ture circuit, you might say, in an
original way."
The Utah administration has
not yet decided whether to file
a law suit against Warhol for the
misrepresentation.

The upcoming program, the cul- offer interested individuals the
mination of months-long work- opportunity to explore dance and!
shop and in-class training, fea- dancing - and the concomitant
tures James Payton of the Ohio experimentation.
State University d'ance depart. The workshops, as well as the
ment. A veteran of the Jose Li- concerts themselves, are held in
mon Dance Company, Payton and the dance studio in Barbour Gym-
his wife, Susanna Newman, will nasium. On Tuesday nights at
present a self-choreographed duet. 7:15, coeducational programs are
Payton will also perform with offered; on Thursday nights, a
Mrs. Elizabeth Bergmann of the co-ed workshop follows men-only
University's physical education classes. The classes all emphasize
department in a dance created by choreography rather than tech-
Mrs. Bergmann. nique, but the latter is often in-
Also featured on the program cluded in the evening sessions.
is "Water Study," the 1927 Doris Special dance classes at theI
Humphrey dance. Specially re- University include a dance com-
constructed by Mrs. Janet De- position class and a dance pro-
scutner of the physical education duction class. While students of

Health Care in 'Dire' Situation,
U.S. Medical Chairman Warns
By GEORGE MILLER A relaxing of some of the strict ally the older, retired, affluent
The present situation of health qualifications for entrance into practitioners who support the
care in the United States is a medical school would serve to in- AMA."
"dre crease the number of persons ac-
"dire" one, and an increase in cepted by the schools. Young said Differing with Young's com-
medical school enrollment as well cep ted sch Y wousi mentary. Payne noted that phys-
as the development of a new kind He later indicated that he wouldi icans are generally conservative
of medical professional are need- admit s aing in o er- and the AMA reflects this attitude.
ed to remedy the situation. disadvantaged young per- He offered an explaination as to
sons with professional potential why medical students usually end
This was the warning made last into the medical schools, noting up being conservative, although
night by Dr. Quentin D. Young, the added cost of necessary ad- they might enteramedicaltschool
national chairman of the Medical ditional tutoring. l a titue. "Asthey
Committee on Human Rights, in A consequence of the shortage progress through the medical cur-
a forum in the amphitheater of of physicians in this country, riculum, they find themselves in-

department, the number will be
performed by student dance ma-
jors.
Students from the dance com-
position class will offer five:
dances to Bartok's 'Microkosmos."
Speech department students will
present a series of pre-classical
dances, and a piece choreographed
to a Theodore Bikel-sung Israeli
folksong will be featured.
The function of the ConcertI
Dance Organization, says Dana
Reitz, '7OEd, is "to introduce tech-
niques and create an atmosphere
in which students can experiment
with themselves and with others."
To this end, the dance troupe's
workshops, classes and programs

the composition class have worked
on actual performances for the
up-coming concerts, students in
production have been focusing on
the technical aspects of the two-
night program.
For students interested in ex-
tending their dance "arenas" be-
yond the classroom, there are a
number of outlets in Ann Arbor
other than the Concert Dance Or-
ganization itself. The city Rec-
reation Department's Ann Arbor
Dance Theater conducts both
classes and public concerts, and
Philip Stamps of the Concert
Dance Organization teaches spe-
cial Monday evening classes in
primitive dance at Ann Arbor
High School.

Lne xieucai ,3IzeI1ce £1Ua. lattb
night. The forum titled, "Crisis
in Medical Care" was sponsored:
by the Student Health Organiza-
tion and also included Dr. Beverly
Payne, assistant dean of the Uni-
versity's medical school, as a
panel member.
Young said that a "paraprofes-
sional" was needed to cope with
the expanding world and the hope-
less plight of persons from dis-
advantaged areas. "We want to
see nurse-sociologists and physi-
cian-psychologists; we want a ver-
tical as well as horizontal move-
ment" in medical school training.

Young noted, is the fact that
twenty per cent of the doctors
who begin practice each year are
those imported from foreign coun-
tries. "We should be sending med-
ical professionals to other coun-
tries instead," he said.
Young, a member of the faculty
of the University of Illinois med-
ical school, had some harsh words
for the American Medical As-
sociation. Calling the organization
a "dinosaur" which "stands in the
idoorway of progress," he said
that it wasn't really the powerful
force many think it is. "It is usu-

volved with a process that details
the knowledge of caring for dis-
ease rather than caring for the
patients as individuals."
One remedy for the crisis in
health care, Young explained
would be the establishment of a
national health corps consisting
of young health professionals, who
would specialize in working in in-
ner city and rural disadvantaged
areas, thus providing improved
care for the persons in these
areas of the country.

LION IN WINTER
Margaret Phillips and Walter Slezak are the stars of the next
Professional Theater Program production, "The Lion in Winter,"
a comedy by James Goldman. The second play in this year's
PTP series, "Lion" comes to Hill Aud. Monday and Tuesday,
Feb. 19 and 20.

I

FOUR ANN ARBOR POETS
AN DREW CARRIGAN
KATHY KOEPEL
TOM SNAPP
W EN DY ROE

NATIONAL 8~NERAL CORPORATION ,.~
I

MON.-THURS. 7:00-9:00
FRI. 7:00-9:00-11:00

OX EASTERN THEATRSL
FOX VIL6E
375 No. MAPLE RD. -769.1300

SAT. 3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00-11:00; SUN. 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
-2nd BIG WEEK-
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
10 EST!
A PICTURE YOU'LL HAVE TO SEE--
AND MAYBE SEE TWICE TO
SAVOR ALL ITS SHARP SATIRIC
WIT AND CINEMATIC TREATS!"
-NEW YORK TIMES
"THE FRESHEST, FUNNIEST
AND MOST TOUCHING FILM
OF THE YEAR!" -SATURDAY REVIEW
"DON'T MISS IT!"-NBC-TV TODAY SHOW
JOSEPH E. LEVINE
MIKE NICHOLS
LAWVRENCE TURMAN,-
t
AI ", I
' I

THIS WEEK AT
BOB WH IT E-
(last Ann Arbor appearance before
going to East Coast)
singing traditional ballads and fun
songs, ,playing guitar, banjo, 1421 Hill St.
and autoharp. 8:30 P.M.
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
Dove sigIin and Shelly Posen
Singing City Folk Music,
playing E & 12 string guitar and banjo
$1.00cover includes entertainment and refreshments!

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 14

CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard (FREE)

8 P.M.

I

111

Feature at 1 :15-3:20
5:25-7:25-9:35
NTO-6
NO 2-6264

LEEMARVIN
90 V
ti Ufi NE5A REAL
1"THE CASE AGAINST SERGEANT RYKER"

I

__

I

COMING
THURSDAY

t

STARTING
THURSDAY

1

Starts TOMORROW!
"SINATRA KNOWS WHAT HE IS DOING
AND HE IS SUCH A GIFTED ACTOR
AND COMEDIAN THAT
HE CAN DO IT WELL.
His Tony is a real guy...aloner.
Flashy women burst into his
life and promise him anything.
He talks a good game and
acts a better one with four- z
bit hoods, shopworn strip-
pers, defrocked physicians,
trembling fences and simperingt
pushers. Sinatra knows his
milieu, which is a fine
thing for any artist to do"
-Newsweek Magazine

ENDING THURSDAY
HERE IT IS..
The Long Awaited
W. C. FIELDS
Film Festival!
The Greatest Laffs
Of The World's
Funniest Man
2 Full-Length
FEATURES
"THE
BANK DICK"
--And--
"NEVER GIVE A
SUCKER AN
EVEN BREAK"
TODAY IS LADIES' DAY
"SUCKER" AT
1:05, 3:40, 6:15, 8:45
"BANK DICK" AT
2:15, 4:45, 7:20, 10:00
DIAL 5-6290
Friday: "The Ambushers"

9

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I

frank sinatra :s tong rome
Co-Starring JILL ST JOHN" RICHARD CONTE " GENA ROWLANDS- SIMON OAKLAND JEFFREY LYNN
LLOYD BOCHNER SHECKY GREENE and SUE LYON as Diana- Produced by Aaron Rosenberg
Directed by Gordon Douglas-"Screenpay by Richard Breen
Bas~dOlhe e l e1n e

V5th Ave. near Liberty-761-9700
V th f'oru mMon. thru Thurs., 7-9
Fri. & Sat., 1-3-5-7-9-11; Sun., 1-3-5-7-9
ENDS TONIGHT
"AN ABSOLUTE KNOCKOUT OF A MOVIE!
...one of the best films of the year!"
- Bosley Crowther, N. Y. Times
"A classic chiller of the 'Psycho' school!"
-Time

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"A tour-de-force of

sex and suspense!"
-Life

PRESENTS
Stratfbrb
National Theatre of Canada
In
SHAKESPEARE'S
"A Midsummer Night's Dream"
with

46

ROMAN
POLAN K1'
REPUESY

STARTS TOMORROW
T1I f MOVIE EVERYONE'S BEEN
WAITING FOR
- cHaRD LESTER's
"WW II WITHOUT ITS
PANTS ONI"--Ramparts
"IT TRULY HURTS
WHEN YOU
LAUGH!I" .. - .-.I I Ar A e ~ V ~ .~-iir

DOUGLAS RAIN MARTHA HENRY
as Bottom as Titania

Directed by JOHN HIRSCH

Designed by LESLIE HURRY

SOLE U.S. ENGAGEMENT! ..

A "1 1

i t 1 !1 t ._

0

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