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February 10, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-10

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. FEBRU'AR'Y 14. IOGA

PAGE TWO THE MICHIc~AN DAILY 5~ATTTRflAV PVRkTTARV 10 IORR

A7Cj1 (./jYLL11} j'L'LjV VCjjV .j_ 1V 1 7V0

- music-
Seeger, Boggs Blend Lyrical Styles

New Coffee House
Serves Informality

With Humor,

Traditional Skills

By BOB FRANKE
It was a different scene alto-'
gether at the Canterbury House.
Very few people were there; the
empty spaces were underlined by
a' Tim Buckley record playing just
below the level of intelligibility.
People knew it was going to be
different; they just didn't know
how. "Mike Seeger" and "Doc
Boggs" were quiet names that
people noticed in a newspaper.
Then Seeger came on with a
fast, bouncy autoharp solo that
was played perfectly, butdid the
same thing the Buckley record
did; it just didn't fit.
It was a strange situation, but
it didn't last for long. Mike See-
ger took in the mood and the
situation with a quiet, wry sense
of humor, and started putting
forth his traditional music with
a confidence and honesty and an
effortless skill that the audience'
could and did easily accept. He
played in a variety of traditional
styles, each one pure and subtle
enough not to need adornment.
He moved from the Cumberland
Mountain Deer Chase and a song
called "Walking Boss" (some of
you might remember the tune of
the latter from a song by the

Mike Seeger

cinema
LFlsbc xlisUnseen Violence of Accident'

now-electric Holy Modal Round-'
ers) on the banjo to the first
version of "A Man of Constant
Sorrow" on the autoharp; the
people started to know what was
happening and to enjoy it. By,
that time a fast-paced mouth-
and autoharp song could be taken
for the happy thing that it was,
and Seeger was free to move.
He took out his fiddle and
moved deeper into the tradition
with "Bonaparte's Retreat," a
breakdown with a stark, droning,
sound that came on like knife-
edged simplicity. The same qual-
ity pervaded "The Lady of Car-
lyle," one of Seeger's favorite
ballads; the main instrument this
time was Seeger's voice, coloring
the song with subtle tenor shad-
ings. Then "Freight Train," done
in such a way as to remind the
audience that the source of the:
"folkie" cliche is a beautiful thing
no matter what. Then a parody
lecture on playing the guitar.
Then Doc Boggs.
Doc Boggs is a 70 year old art-
ist who's been "learning the banjo
for 58 years." It is not so much
his age that commands respect
as what he has done with it; he
is one of the men from whom
'Seeger learned his confidence in
the music. There is no embarrass-
ment over his age nor any ques-
tion of its vitality; his unique,
steadily rhythmic style precludes
these.
His music, like his humor, has
a fine temper of experience to it.'
His banjo follows the melody of
his songs with the lower strings'
as the treble strings maintain
rhythm. The effect is very sure
and clean. Doc Boggs was the
first man to play blues on the
banjo; his style transforms the
blues into a unique hybrid which
extends them into a totally
unexpected area. His singing
throughout is straightforward,
with the same stark evenness.
His humor is filled with the
awareness that age brings. "Get
out of the graveyard, Doc," a
friend of his would say when
Boggs would play a song about
death, to which the banjo player
would reply, "Just be quiet, you'll!
wind up there sometime." And as
the old man starts to sing "Death,
oh, Death" the audience begins to
sense, and perhaps to envy, his
fuller consciousness of life..
U.S. Savings Stamps teach
early thrift and citizenship

The owners of Mark's, Paul . Sedgeman, a local sculptor, de-
Melton, Mark Sedgeman and signed the new interior of Mark's.
Lloyd Cross, hope to give the pub- He has made use of natural wood
lic a restaurant with "a relaxed to partially cover the white walls.
and leisurely atmosphere." The owners have sanded the floor:
Sedgeman was pleased with the to a natural maple.
turnout on their first few days. Featured in the interior is a3
"We've had an excellent response large, carved oak table in the
so far. There has been a steady center of the room with smaller
stream of people since we first tables placed around it. Food is
opened," Sedgeman said. served from a long canopied bar
The new coffee house hopes to with redwood posts.
include entertainment by per- Mark's drew a very diverse cli-

By STEVE ANZALONE
Mark's is a new coffee house
on William Street that will pro-
vide classical music, poetry and
plays. The restaurant opened
last night with a performance by
classical guitarist and composer
Peter Griffith.
Mark's will operate seven days
a week from 9 a.m. to midnight.
Entertainment will be scheduledI
for weekends and some week
night,.

a person rapport between artist
and audience. He noted that
Mark's has this kind of favorable
atmosphere.
Other entertainment plans in-
clude the Stel Majo String Quar-
tet tomorrow. Poetry readings and
plays are still tentative.
Mark's offers an unusual selec-
tion of sandwiches and pastries.
The menu carries five different
kinds of coffee.

By DEBORAH LINDERMAN
A still, ivy-covered brick house,
the sound of a car motor peeling
to crescendo, a crash, two faces
behind a shattered window and
then serenity again: this is the
"Accident" which opens Joseph
Losey's film. It closes with the
same scene. The sound of the
motor rises to a shot of Step-
hen, a philosophy don (Dirk
Bogarde), walking through an
Oxford cloister. The sound track
then bridges,-to a shot of Step-
hen's house as he gathers up his
children and takes them inside.
We never see the actual crash,
only hear it. Framed by these
two scenes, the rest of the film
is a long flashback -- leisurely in
its rhythms, restrained in dia-
lougue, idyllic in images--which
"explains" the violence of the
"accident."
Losey's screenplay was done by
Harold Pinter. His reticent dia-
logue betrays very little of what
is going on below the surface of
the words. But these manage to
build themselves into a texture
of mood and emotion, and a
storyline.
Pinter's understatement is
counterpointed by Losey's cam-
era. For that is set to catch,
without ostentation, just the
flicker of expression or the phy-
sical angle that expands what

the script itself both implies and
hides.
The story, such as it is, set in
Oxford and Oxfordshire -- old
yellow stone, green English mea-
dows. William (Michael York),
who dies in the crash, is one
of the don's aristocratic pupils,
and takes a fancy to another
pupil, Anna (Jacquiline Sassard).
The don is married, at the crit-
ical age of forty, and takes a
fancy to her too. So does his
best friend, Charley (Stanley
Baker), with the same credent-
ials.
The only declared relationship
is that between the pupils, a
charming boyish William and
suave Ann. But the film's crux
is Stephen's struggle to deal
with his emotions and sitaution.
Its triumph is that none of this
potentially trite material ever
consolidates into clinche.
Partly this is so because the
tensions of the relationships are
suppressed beneath the innocuous
ways in which all these people
come together: punting, tutor-
ials, frolics on the lawn with
Stephen's children, cricket. They
a r e a 11I intelligent civilized
people, and they all like each
other. They also understand
what is happening to them and
are sophisticated enough to
know that tampering with things
won't help.

The real passion, never overt,:
between Stephen and Anna, sets
off nervous subtleties in all, when
any of them come together.
Every encounter is charged by
the central sexual situation.
Though the primary drama is
Stephen's torment, each of the!
characters is "caught" in some-
thing and each is thus "dra-
matic."
All this turbulence, in fact, sur-
faces only in the car crash. Vis-
ually and aurally the mood is
lyric. The camera lingers ex-
plicity on the Oxford gargoyles
and statuary, and the soundtrack
picks up clock bells, insect
noises, the wind: tradition andf
domesticity arerthe backdrop.
and limits of a very volatile sex-
uality.
Three things - the tightness:
of the dialogue, the low-pitched
camerawork, the ambivalence
that belongs to virtually eachl
role - put a tremendous burden
on the actors, and they are su-
perb. Only Jacqueline Sassard,
though she does appropriately
underplay Anna, seems too ex-
pressionless.
Loseyhas quoted a friend as
saying that the film was "like
a stick, you can pick it up and
shake it and it won't break," The
metaphor is apt, The work is:
"whole."

Loe &PkArite's accidnt"\
"LIKE A PUNCH IN THE CHEST. PUT
TOGETHER BREATH BY BREATH,
LOOK BY LOOK, LUST BY LUST,
LIE BY LIE. A COMPELLING FILM:"
--Newsweek Magazine
WINNER TWO CANNES FILM FESTIVAL AWARDS
Dirk Bogarde - Stanley Baker
The Joseph Losey
Production of
accident
Screenplay by
Harold Pinter
- Directed by
Joseph Losey
e In Color
SHOWS AT DIAL
1,3,5,7,&9 t 8-6416
NOW
EATE USHOWING
rOMMIE MAJDR.,..R U.B. SERGEANT?

I

formers of classical music. The
owners are currently looking for
a variety of talent, particularly
with an international flavor. They!
feel that the public will support
high quality classical music
played in informal surroundings.
Griffith, who will also be play-
ing tonight, said that the coffee
house atmosphere lends itself to
ORGANIZATION,
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
room 1011 SAE.
Bach Club meeting, Wed., Feb. 14,
8:00 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe,
discussion, led by John Harvith, on
Dance Forms in Bach's Music. BYO
Bach records. For further information,
call 769-2922.
Seventh-day Adventist Student Asso-
ciation seminar, Feb. 10, 2:00 p.m., 3511
SAB. Speaker: Donald Bostian, "Old
Testament Authority."
Graduate Outing Club, meeting for
new members, Feb. 10, 2:00 p.m., Rack-
ham, Huron Street entrance.
University Forum, Feb. 11, 10 a.m.,
Friends' Center, 1416 Hill. "Life AfterI
the University: It's gotta be better vs
It's gonna be more of the Same."
Young Americans for Freedom (Con-
servative Union) will sponsor a talk
by Pham Khac Rau, Ex-South Viet-
namese Ambassador to the U.S. at 7:30
p.m. in room 3-D of the Union. Pub-
tic welcome.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Feb. 11, 9:45 & 11:15 a.m.,
Worship Services with Pastor Scheips
speaking on "Raising and Razing,"
11:15 a.m., Bible Class study of Ro-
mans, 6:00 p.m., Fellowship supper, 6:45
p.m. Gamma Delta program-Christian
Ethics in Modern Society.
Lutheran Student Chapel-Hill at
Forest Ave., Feb. 11, 6:00 p.m.-Supper
Feb. 11, 6:00 p.m.-Supper, 7:00 p.m.-
Program-'"Chicago Urban Workshop.
HERE IT IS ... .
TheL Long Awaited
W. C. FIELDS
Film Festival!.

entele the first week. The people
seemed to enjoy the naturalness
of the interior. The owners hope
to increase the decor with a cer-
amics display by J. T. Abernathy.

3020 Wasntenaw Ph. 434-1782
Between Ann Arbor & Ypsi
D il
Dolls
Show Time: Wed.-Sat.-Sun.
1:00-3:03-5:06-7:09-9:15
Mon.-Tues.; Thurs.-Fri. 7:05-9:15

\ I.EE
EXPLODESINTO ACTIONAS
"ERGEANT
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE
in COLOR

4

See Feats

ure at }

1:15-3:15-5:20-7:25-9:35

U4

Now Showing

FOX EASTERN THEATRES
375 No. MAPLE RD. "7691300

Monday thru Thursday times
7:00 -9:00

Fri.: T-00-9:00-1 1:00-

SAT. 3:00 - 5:00 - 7:00 - 9:00 - 11:00
SUN. 1:00 - 3:00 - 5:00 - 7:00 - 9:00

HELD OVER

at the

Vt

iliil

761-9700

210 S. FIFTH AVENUE-BETWEEN WASHINGTON AND LIBERTY

thGe..KA1~TIE...
the whole crazy
miled-up loi' story is
back in ac 1on.

NOTICE!!! 11:00 P.M. SHOWING FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
"0 EOFTHEYAR'S
10 BEST!
A PICTURE YOU'LL HAVE TO SEE-
AND MAYBE SEE TWICE TO,
SAVOR ALL ITS SHARP SATIRIC
WIT AND CINEMATIC TREATS!"1'
-NEW YORK TIMES
"THE FRESHEST, FUNNIEST AND
MOST TOUCHINGFILMOF THE YEAR!"
-SATURDAY REVIEW
"A MILESTONE IN AMERICAN
FILM HISTORY"-STANLEY KAUFFMANN
"THE FUNNIEST COMEDY
OF THE YEAR!"-CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
"DON'T MISS IT!M-NBC-TV TODAY SHOW
JOSEPH E. LEVINE
P RESENT S
MIKE NICHOLS
LAWRENCE TURMAN
PRIODUCTION .
.. This
is
... Benjamn
He's
alittle
worried
about
Y his
:. future.

.

r' h' .b.L'5eeches...
the belching scene...
the escape
through the jge..
Bogart
Academy Award
performac8
oppos; ¬ĘS f
Hepburnat
tir blstering best.
John IHston
i4'oducevdby *_I ' '

The Greatest Laffs
Of The World's
Funniest Man
2 Full-Length
FEATURES
"THE
BANK DICK"
-And
"NEVER GIVE A
SUCKER AN
EVEN BREAK"
"SUCKER" AT
1:05, 3:40, 6:15, 8:45
"BANK DICK" AT
2:15, 4:45, 7:20, 10:00

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.,
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SHOW TIMES:
SAT. :
1 -3-5-7-9-1 1

THE GRADUATE

i

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