100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 07, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


FPAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 7, 1968'

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, JANUARY 7,1968

LBJ Plans Tax on Travel
Abroad To End Gold Flow

WASHINGTON (I)-Americans
will still be free to travel overseas
under the administration's new
program to end the dollar drain
but it could cost them more
money.
It was learned that the admin-
istration is leaning away from any
outright bans or legal restrictions
on travel abroad and will concen-
trate instead on discouraging
travle outside the hemisphere,
most likely through a tourist tax
of some sort.
This course seemed likely to fol-
low a New Year's Day announce-
ment by President Johnson of an
austerity program to end the dol-
lar drain which one official de-
scribed as a "go for broke" plan.
Secretary of the Treasury Henry
H. Fowler, in explaining the fac-
tors which led to the cutbacks and

proposed cutbacks in spending
abroad, listed the British devalua-
tion as the immediate but not the
only cause.
It only heightened the pressure
to end the outflow of dollars which
has :plagued the nation since 1950,
he said.
Until now, Fowler said, the ad-
ministration has engaged in a
holding action against the dollar
drain but the voluntary restraints
were inadequate to cope with the
changes stemming from devalua-
tion.
Alternatives
He declined to spell out any of
the measures which might be
taken to discourage overseas travel
until he discuses the question with
Congress. He has said the whole
range of alternatives will be con-
sidered.

Board Seeks Funds,
For School Buildings

But it was learned that the ad-'
ministration wants to steer clear
of any such restrictions as an out-
right ban on travel or a limit on
the amount of money a person can
carry abroad.
Government officials who con-
tinually study the balance of
payments figure considered a head
tax on tourism in early 1966, but
rejected it at that time as un-
needed. But even those officials
who opposed this type of restric-
tion in 1966 now feel there's no
alternative, one source said.
1.6 Billion
During the 1966-the last com-
plete year for which figures are
available - traveling Americans
spent $1.6 bilion more in other
countries than foreign travelers
spent here.
Some $600 millon of this travel
gap was with western Europe. An-
other $700 million stemmed from
the cost of transportation to and
from foreign countries, mainly as-
sociated with Western Europe.
Travel abroad on a foreign airline
is a minus on the U.S. balance of
payments books.
That's why officials are looking
to Europe for cutbacks. In restrict-
ing U.S. investments, the admin-
istration imposed an outright ban
on new investments in Western
Europe except for the United
Kingdom, Greece and Finland.
Fowler has urged other countries
to contribute more to world devel-,
opment and to help neutralize the
costs of stationing U.S. troops
abroad. Neutralizing these costs
is a part of the new program.
Fowler said Western Europe
has been a net importer of capital
although countries there as a
whole have in recent years run
surpluses in their balance of pay-
ments. The United States has
been in deficit yet has been a net
exporter of capital, he added.
He said the investment bans
and travel plan-as yet a volun-
tary restraint - are temporary
and "I look forward to the day
the United States will be in bal-
ance or surplus and can get rid
of the mandatory controls and
even put the voluntary program
on the shelf."

SGC Offers
Health Plan
For Students
By JOYCE KOHLENBERG
SGC's Student Health Insur-
ance, consisting of a $30 premium
which provides 12 months of cov-
erage against ski and motorcycle
accidents, mental, physical, and
nervous disorders, and the like
will be available for the first
three weeks of this semester.
This policy is basically a hos-
pitalization plan, similar to Blue
Cross. but much less expensive
due to its availability on a stu-
dent-group basis.
Four Plans
Students may enroll in the in-
surance plan at the beginning of
the fall, winter, and spring-sum-
mer trimesters until three weeks
after the new term begins. The
12-month premium of $30 is pro-
rated accordingly throughout the
year, it has been pro-rated by two-
thirds for the eight-month cover-
age now available at $20 for the
'Student Only' plan.
There are four basic clans
available: Student Only; Student
and Spouse; Student, Spouse and
Children; and Student and Chil-
dren. The annual premiums are
$30, $85, $117, and $62, respec-
tively. The additional maternity1
plan has been dropped this year
due to lack of claims in this area.
Past experience of this plan
makes it impractical to offer ade-
quate coverage at reasonable cost.
All-Year Policy
This premium maintains cover-
age during all vacations periods,
as well as during the school year.
It has been estimated that one out'
of four students is enrolled for this
all-year insurance plan which
covers the policy holder anywhere
that he may travel during the
year.
More than 2,000 students per
year benefit from the insurance,
excluding Health Service cases.
The plan will also pay in addition
to any other insurance coverage
the student may hold.
A blanket $3,000 expense benefit'
covers any one accident, and sick-
ness is covered by 100 per cent of
the first $300 plus 80 per cent of
the excess expense. Hospital room
and board is payable up to $28 per
day for 40 days.

EDITOR'S NOTE: Ambassador
Chester Bowles and a U.S. State
iepartment team are flying to
Uambodia this week to discuss
the vietnam war and its side effects
with P'rince Norodom Sihanouk,
the 45-year-old Cambodian chief
of state. Here is a timely interview
with Prince Sihanouk on the ques-
tion of hot pursuit across borders
and other aspects of the war.
By The Associated Press
Prince Norodom Sihanouk, the
Cambodian chief of state, said
yesterday he would not help ar-
range talks with Communist North
Vietnam or Communist China, and
suggested that the United States
contact the Communist Viet Cong
instead. "I cannot make contacts
that are doomed to failure in ad-
vance," Sihanouk added.
His statements were in answers
to a series of written questions!
submitted by The Associated Press

TALKS 'FUTILE':
Sihanouk Refutes Role as Peace Agent'

English, and the answers, trans-
lated unofficially from Sihanouk's
original French, were as follows:
Q. In view of worldwide anxiety
concerning the Vietnam war as
well as the immediate dangers it
poses to Cambodia, have you taken
or do you intend to undertake
contacts with Hanoi or Peking
which could lead to talks between
the belligerents?
A. I cannot make contacts that
are doomed to failure in advance.
Hanoi and Peking have always
made it known to me that they
would refuse to have conversations
with the "aggressors of Vietnam."
At any rate, the United States
poses the question badly: it is with
the National Liberation Front
Viet Cong of South Vietnam that
it is fighting. It is to them that
they, the Americans' should ad-
dress themselves if they are seeking
peace. An end to the bombings
of North Vietnam would no doubt
furnish the possibility of a useful
approach.
Q. Have you formally confirmed
to the United States your willing-
ness to hold talks on the border
situation? Where and when should
these talks take place? Under what
circumstances would you permit
hot pursuit by United States troops
into Cambodia?
A. Ambassador Chester Bowles,
personal representative of Presi-
dent Johnson, will be in Phnom
Penh toward Jan. 9. We will ob-
viously discuss all the subjects
of common interest.
I never "permitted" American
pursuit in Cambodia: A sovereign
country cannot give such a "per-
mission" and our people would not
consent to it. I only indicated that
we would not intervene militarily
if a fight between Americans and
infiltrated Vietnamese, therefore
one as much at fault as the other,
tools place in the outlying and un-
inhabited regions of our territory.
Q. Do you believe that a neu-
tralized Vietnam can be accom-
plished? If so, how?
A. This appears to me, for the
present, impossible. The 1954
Geneva accords foresaw the re-
unification of South and North
Vietnam after general elections
that Ho Chi Minh, president of
North Vietnam, rightly adorned

with the halo of the liberator,
would have won hands down.
Knowing this, the United States1
has refused to allow elections,;
preventing the reunification from
being accomplished. But the more
the Americans hound Vietnam, the
more the regime of the North wins
the hearts of the people of the
South.
For the moment, I advise the
Americans to very carefully read
the political program of the Na-
tional Liberation Front of South
Vietnam, which promises neutral-
ity and an altogether liberal dem-

i

NOW Program Information 4 5-6290 TODAY
From 1 P.M.
Italians make love like
they make antipasto...m
with a little bit of
everythingl
%v~eeSand
mIltalians
A new triumph from the Director oft DIVORCE ITALIAN STYLE"
Robert Haggiag presents
PIETRO GERMI'STHE BIRDS;THE BEES AND THE ITAUANS' starring VIRNA LIS I
and the funniest groupofItaliansever ssembledl
_ _ _ _ _ __i.{:11'L'YL.:1_i C)Gt\} i"" 3n.:""L"::::_.._.e.____.____}, u __
i': }:S::: ?.:a.n:."f"'h1{:}"::':" ."2 i]:": i:"": b".::aSi':"":}{ L:L':":":{4"F?::Si!t+?X ;;"v:N":.. ._,.n ....r

ocracy for the South for several
years.
A solution would perhaps con-
sists of allowing Vietnam to re-
unify. as North Vietnam intends,
and propose to accept its reunifiedc
Vietnam's neutralization from the
international point of view while
at the same time allowing it to re-
main socialist domestically.
The socialism of the Vietnamese
is very nationalistic and patriotic,
and very jealous of its independ-
ence. Such a solution would per.4
haps be acceptable to North Viet-

(Continued frdm Page 1)
all students in the city will re-
ceive "equal benefit" from the
new facilities.
Specific problems relating to
the proposed building programs,
according to Mrs. Wheeler, in-
clude de facto segregration in the
schools, discrimination in the ap-
prenticeship program, and a lack
of emphasis on vocational train-
ing.
Student Interest
Unprecedented interest in the
refrendum has been raised among
the student body at Ann Arbor
High School. In a letter sent to
all parents of high school students
by the Student Council, the stu-
denthrepresentatives, while taking
no stand on the proposal, urged
voters to give the issue proper
consideration.
"As students who have come
through a number of years of
schooling in the Ann Arbor school
system, and as future citizens of
this community, we are deeply
interested in the educational fu-
ture of the Ann Arbor area," the
letter said. The letter emphasized
that the items in the proposal
"are all geared to the foreseen in-
creased student enrollment."
Students Urge a 'Yes'
A group of about 30 "concerned
students" at Ann Arbor High has
also been distributing a leaflet
throughout the local community
urging a "yes" vote on the pro-
posal. Countering charges of "ir-
responsible spending" by the
school board, the leaflet demon-
strates an "unprecedented" jump
in local building costs between
1962 when Huron High was con-
ceived and 1966-67 when construe-
tion was actually begun.
"This bond proposal must be
passed," the leaflet states. "We, as
students in the school system,
know what conditions are like in
our schools. The schools are too
crowded, and the irritations and
tensions that occur as a result
make the educational atmosphere
of the schools something less than
ideal."
Enrollment Raise
School board figures indicate
that by 1971, when the proposed
first section of the third high
school is to be constructed, school
enrollment will be three times as
high as in 1955, when the current
high school was built. According

to the board, senior high schools
are planned to accommodate 1,800
to 2,300 students, but this year
Ann Arbor High has 3,250. About
a third of the students are housed
in 21 portable classrooms and 10
rooms-such as a cloakroom and
music rooms-that were never in-
tended for regular classes.
,etroit News
Lays Off
'300 Clerks
DETROIT M) - The Detroit
News, which has been shut down
since mid-November by striking
truck drivers, Friday laid off 300
clerical workers.
The News said it was the first
layoff of nonunion personnel
since the paper was shut down on
Nov. 16 after members of the
Teamsters Union walked off the
job.
The News sai dsome 325 editor-
ial employes would not be af-
fected by the layoff.
The Detroit Free Press, whose
editorial and clerical workers are
represented by the American
Newspaper Guild, laid off all its
union workers when it closed
down the day after the News.
The Free Press said it shut down
because it negotiated come con-
tracts jointly with the News.
The Detroit Daily Dispatch, one
of the three interim newspapers
threatened with a shutdown by
the Teamsters, signed a contract
with the union Friday. The Team-
sters signed contracts with the
other two papers, the Daily Press
and the Daily Express Thursday.
Philip Dermer, publisher of the
Dispatch, said their contract with
the Teamsters, like those at the
Daily Press and the Daily Ex-
press, would increase wages by
10 per cent.
The Teamsters had threatened
to close down the strike papers if
they did not meet the contract
demands the union is making of
the News.
Dermer, a truck driver at the
Free Press, was elevated from
circulation manager of the Dis-
patch to publisher Thursday.

NOW A MOVIE!

".

Prince Sihanon k

on the Vietnam war and its peri-
pheral aspects affecting Cambodia.
His answers came as prepara-
tions were being made in Phnom
Penh for him to talk, starting
about Tuesday, with Ambassador
Chester Bowles, the American en-
voy to India serving on a special
mission for President Johnson.
The Prince's written answers in-
dicated that he did not believe in
a possibility of a neutralized Viet-
nam, at least for the time being.
The questions, submitted in

Vail
eyl

DAILY OFFICIA L BU L LET IN
fi{.r ^;.{4 GYC~i".;.:'ir"' :{rf.":{ :S"}}?:4::"M:S:.}}:{S"'"'fi'SS{:: .om.":wa+1 .41 1.14

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
offirial publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only,
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-92l70.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 7
Events Monday
Neuropsychopharmacology Training
Program-Drugs, Brain, and Behavior
Seminar-Dr. B. W. Agranoff, The Uni-
versity of Michigan, "Effect of Anti-
muetabolites on Memory Formation":
M7412 Medical Science Building, 12:00
to 1:00 p.m.
Members of the Women's Research
Club: will meet Monday, Jan.,8, at
3 p.m. in the West Conference Room,
Rackham Bldg. The subject of the
paper to be presented by Miss Marilyn
S. Berman is "Method of Speech Ther-
apy for the Aphasic Patient."
General Notices
Sigma XI Lecture-Dr.' Charles G.
Overberger, Chairman, Department of

Chemistry
"Polymers
Wed., Jan.
8:00 P.M.

University of Michigan,
Having Catalytic Effects,"
10, Rackham Amphitheater,

Usher Sign Up-Hill Auditorium Spe-
Jial Series (concerts sponsored by stu-
dent organizations) 1053 Administra-
tion Bldg. or call 764-8293, Mon.-Fri.,
8-5 p.m.
Placement
Interviews for Placement, week of
Jan. 15-Jan. 19, 1968. Make appts. as
early as possible, deadline is 4:00 day
preceding interview date. All employers
expect to see resumes on students.
Register now or bring forms up to
date, current addresses are important.
Monday, January 15, 1968
Michigan Department of Civil Service,
Lansing, Mich.-M & F. Seeking all
degree levels Anthro., Econ., Educ.,
Engl., Fine Arts, Gen. Lib. Arts, Geog.,
Geol., Hist., Journ., Law, Libr. Sci,
Math, Microbiol., Music, Nat'l. Res.,
Pharm., Philo., Phys., Poli. Sci., Psych.,
Pubi. Health, Speech, Soc., Soc. Wk.,
Chem, (all areas.) for Banding., Biol.,
(Continued on Page 8)

NATIONAL ENERAL COPORATIONMON.-FRI.
NOW ~FOX EASTERN THEATRES~ O.FI
N Jungle Bo
SHOWING FOX VILLa5E 7.00-9:5
375 No. MAPLE RD.-.769-1300 Charlie
A S WINGING SAFARI OF LAUGHS!
Walt Disny7resents
TheAn all cartoon TECHNICOLOR*
feature
S97Walt Disney Productions
WALT DISNEY'S THE
ADVENTURES
OF A
TEEN-ACE
MOUNTAIN
TECHNICOLORO LIONI
JungleBook1:00-3:45-6:30-9:00
Charlie 2:25-5:10-7:50-10:40

AMAKh CENTURY- FOX Present 9.6
SHARON IaI[ .IBOff SGO111[[RaN1 IBE Siff i PEis GE RRJESSE[
SVSA!1 HAYARaImLUU

W4 rds
-W41

4 SHOWS
1:30-4:00
6:30-9:00

NEXT
"A MAN
CALLED
DAGGER"

b.

R

Vth Forum

210 S. FIFTH AVE.
761 -970

NEW TIME POLICY:
CONVENIENT MATINEES EVERY DAY
LATE SHOWS AT 1 1:00 EVERY FRI. & SAT.
MON. thru THURS. Shows of 2:30-7:00-9:00
FRI. & SAT. continuous from 1:00; Shows 1-3-5-7-9-11
SUN. continuous from 1 :00; Shows 1-3-5-7-9

I

DIAL
5-6290

SHOWS AT
1, 3, 5,7,9 P.M.

Year's Finest Suspense Film!

_""'-

AUDREY
HEPBURN

As am
ARKIN

CRENNA

TODAY
CINEMA 11
PRESENTS
SIR LAURENCE OLIVIER'S

I

c
L E-7

with JEAN SIMMONS and BASIL SYDNEY
Also: "FLASH GORDON"

Aud

A

3:00 P.M.

Angell Hall

I

II

':::i IR:. ;.:;jU : , :1'r;:iCT .. "r{ ..' tifi

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan