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February 03, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-03

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1968

P4GE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3,1968

music

Buddy C
By ALAN NEFF
Buddy Guy,. came to Chicago's
South Side in 1957, from Baton
Rouge. He got there just before I
left, in 1960, for good. Until last
night at the Canterbury House.
that was the closest I ever got to
him.
My part of the South Side was
the part whites came to as soon
as they had a little money and
left as soon as they had a little
more. They moved further south,
to the suburbs, or the North Side.
For whites on the move, Buddy
Guy's part of the South Side is
Creative Arts
Festival
Saturday, Veb. 3
BOBBY HUTCHERSON
TRIO
Trueblood Aud., 8:30 p.m.
LORD CHAMBERLAIN'S
Players-
"Salome"
Angell Hall Foyer, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 4
MUSIC FROM MARLBORO
Rackham Aud., 2:30 p.m.
CONCERT DANCE
ORGANIZATION
Barber Gymnasium, 8 p.m.
CLAUDE BROWN
Union Ballroom, 8 p.m.
the part you drive through,
(quickly) on the way to the
North Side.
As a kid I played softball and
football. Guy player guitar and
left school to do it. When my
family drove through Guy's black
South Side, I tried to make my-
self a little less conspicuous in
the back seat. That South Side
scared me to silence.
After, that, I lived on higher and

I
Fuy Plays
higher apartment plateaus until
I could no longer see the faces
people carried on the streets down
below. While the faces were get-
ting smaller and smaller, I was
listening to more and more music.
A lot of the records I listened to
were blues-Delta and Chicago-
and I liked them.
I'd heard Guy on records, back-
ing Junior Wells, and I thought
Guy was "all right." That is what
you say: with emphasis on both'
the "all" and the "right" and a
pause between them. The words
somehow manage to have two or
three syllables apiece. The better
things are, the more syllables
manage to fit.
When Buddy Guy and his band
fling out their opening number,
you begin smiling almost at once.
Your reluctance about intruding
in . someone else's life fades and
you feel calmer because the band
begins with an instrumental. It is
very loud and loose, almost rag-
ged, but not quite. You watch
each face and every part of Guy.
When he starts sliding aid bend-
ing the notes you have to laugh
because he is so good a leader.
They call their second number
"Cantelope Man," something that,
among us groundlings, is known
by the name "Watermelon Man."
The song reminds you of a grin-
ning snake that has loud, all-
encompassing coils. I start pound-
ing on the notebook I'm supposed
to be writing in and cigar ashes
fall over everything.
. The third number is slow, the
hardest type of blues to play and
make meaningful. He punctuates
every sentence - phrase he says
- plays with a brief, neat run.
"Mary had a little Lamb" sneaks
into one of these runs and an
appreciative audience applauds -
all white, if memory serves, and
still a little hesitant. The saxo-

'All Right' Blues
phones enter very late and the The pause is followed by "Mary
band fnishes with characteristic had a little lamb," as a number
strength. of its own. Guy proceeds to take
Guy tells us he's going to do "I off his guitar, as I might take off
Feel Good" and everyone, the band my pants - the long way, down
and the audience becomes very, over his legs. Then he steps out
very happy, of it and does runs with one hand,

Intense Fighting Hits
S. Vietnamese Cities

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The next number, "When I
First Met You, Baby," is slow and
the most coherent piece up to
then.
Guy then introduces the other
members of the band. Al Duncan,
drums; A. C. Reed, tenor sax;
Bobby Fields, second sax; Jack
Meyers, drum and cigarets. The
audience is grinning from ear to
collective ear.

plays it behind his back and puts
it back on the ordinary way, when
everyone is looking. He finishes
the song somehow.
When I left, I forgot my cigar-
ets. That gives me two reasons to
go back. I ran out the door and
then ran back in because Reed was
doing a vocal. Lord have mercy.
Guy said that earlier in the eve-
ning.

(Continued from Page 1)
in small boats on the Saigon
River.
In the Chinese Cholon section
of the capital, fighting broke out
in front of a children's hospital.
Cholon was hit by six Viet Cong
mortar shells during the night.
Win Main Gate
At Hue, a main gate of the cit-
adel was reported wrested from
Communist control. The U.S. Com-
mand said the enemy with-drew
into the northern part of the old
walled areas under repeated straf-
ing and rocket raids by allied
fighter bombers.
The allies reported killing more
than 300 enemy in bitter fighting
at Hue yesterday.
He said 15 planes and 23 heli-
copters were destroyed and about
100 other planes so severely dam-
aged that they would have to be
replaced.
The average cost of American

FranKle and Johnny'
Groove at Smitty's'

warplanes is estimated at $2 mil-
lion.
Food supplies in Saigon started
to run low and prices soared. Au-,
thorities faced the problem of how
to distribute reserve rice stocks
though barricaded streets, with
the Viet Cong still in parts of the
city.
Shops Close
Shops remained closed but sev-
eral small food markets opener
after a 24 hour curfew was lifted
for six hours a day for the Viet-
namese.
At the resort city of Dalat, 140
miles northeast of Saigon, enemy
machine gun fire hit U.S. Instal
lations, the railroad station and r
South Vietnamese army post.
At Xuan Loc, a provincial capital
38 miles east of Saigon, Commu-
nist troops swarmed in from two
sides and hit at every allied com-
pound in the city. American planes
strafed the attackers.
More than 500 enemy attacked
allied positions in Ben Tre cjty, a
provincial capital in the Mekong
Delta. U.S. headquarters said the
attack was repulsed after 5 1
hours.
In Can Tho, another provincial
capital and the largest city in the
delta south of Saigon, mortar
rounds set off several fires in the
U.S. Special Forces compound near
the airfield.
Vinh Loi
About 100 enemy attacked the
provincial capital of Vinh Loi in
the delta's southern tip. U.S. head-
quarters said the Communists were
driven back from the U.S. mission
building and a militia compound.
-

FEBRUARY 1, 1968
Day Ca lenidar
Eighteenth Annual Mathematics Ed-
ucation Conference - Registration,
Lobby, Hill Auditorium, 8:00 a.m.
Gymnastics-U-M vs. University of
Minnesota: Intramural Sports Build-
ing, 2:00 p.m.
Wrestling- JJ-M vs. University of
Pittsburgh: Events Building, 3:00 p.m.
Cinema Guild - "Charlie Chaplin
Night": Architecture Aud., 7:00 and
9:05 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital --
Catherinie Merena, Piano: School of
Music Recital Hall, 8:30 p.m.
GeneralN Noices
TV Center Programs: On Sun., Feb.
4 the following program produced by.
the TV Center will have its initial
telecast in Detroit:
12:00 Noon, wWJ-TV, channel 4 -
Education: Today and Tomorrow.
"Schools and Delinquency." Four edu-
cators discuss the schools methods of
dealing with delinquency.
Members of the Women's Research
Club: will meet Monday, Feb. 5, at
8 p.m. in the West Conference Room,
Rackham Bldg. The topic to be dis-
cussed by Dr. Margaret L. Clay of
MHRI is "Research and the Real
World-A Credibility Gap?"
The Martha Cook Building will con-I
tinue to receive' first appointments!
for residence through Tuesday, Feb.
6. Please call 769-3290 for appointment.
Second appointments will be accepted
through Friday, Feb. 9.
SGC
SUMMARY OF ACTION TAKEN
BY SGC AT ITS MEETING
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3
Approved: To adopt the report of the
Elections Director and authorize him

to proceed in accordance with it.
The new election plan has as its
j imary objective the participation
of as many students as possible.
Under the plan, the election would
consist of tw"o and a half weeks of
campaigning, with the Spring Break
in between. Dates would be:
Wednesday,. Feb. l - Cannpaigning
begins.
Wednesday. Feb. 28 - Spring Break
begins.
Tuesday & Wednesday. March 12 &
13-General Campus Elections.
Wednesday, March 13-Ballots count-
ed.
As part of the program, a "speakers
bureau," would be established through
which candidates could arrange a
complete campaign covering the whole
campus. Each fraternity and sorority
house, as well as each house in the
dormitories, would be contacted, and
each house president would be asked
to call, a general meeting for each
member of the house at which candi-
dates could present their positions
and state their platform. This would
alleviate much of the traditional hard-
ship on both the presidents and the
candidates, as it Would be a coordi-
nated program giving each candidate
an equal chance. In addition, the
Spring Break coming as it would just
before the election would give a need-
ed respite to the candidates.- -
Again two days of general elections
would be held with polling booths
placed at strategic spots on the diag
and other places to provide ample op-
portunity for anyone to vote.
Figures for winter '68' occupancy
aren't compiled yet; however, an A£c
curate estimate placed the total num-
ber of students living in dormitories at
close to 10,000. approximately 5,000 0f
which are freshmen.
The final new feature would elimi-
nate the frantic "count-nite." Very
simple IBM cards would be drawn up
containing the names of all candidates,
placed into a University computer es-
pecially programmed for the election,
counted, and ensure an accurate and
complete and simple counting proce-
dure.
Approved: That SGC allow Panhel-
(Continued on Page 8)

By JIM PETERS
Dare we reveal the secret of
Frankie and Johnny? The amaz-
ing, story should not be the pri-
vate miracle of the crowd that
was at Smitty's South Quad last
night. Bob Franke (Frankie), folk
singer, guitarist and song writer,
does amazing things with a sim-
ple glass of plain old water.
At least that's the way it
seemed. Franke and his bass part-
ner Johnny Miller weren't mak-
ing it with the group; people
were talking while he sang and
Bob suddenly discovered a crack-
ing voice-his between-song mon-
ologue was slippery and disjoint-
ed.
But then his slow joke on mar-
ijuana and that magic glass of
water, and he was an entertainer,
grooving. Spacing his own songs
with Dylan and Lennon-McCar-

thy tunes, he was really feeling.
When doing his own composi-
tions,ehe found his voice and au- Across
dience best with the irony of
"Talking Student ReactionaryC
Chicken Blues." But this was aft-
er he won with Dylan.
Franke's best voice, his best A d a n c e program entitled
characterization, suddenly ap- "Facets of Choreography" will be
peared when he came up with presented by the Concert Dance
Dylan's ''Brand-New Leopard- Organization at 8 p.m. Sunday
Skin Pillbox Hat." His sense of evening in the dance studio of
vocal dynamics and subtle "ru- Barbour Gymnasium.
bato" rhythms in this song The program will be narrated
proved remedy enough for pre- by Mrs. Janet Descutner, a mem-
vious troubles. ber of the dance faculty. The eve-
Franke plays frequently in Ann ning will begin with a demonstra-
Arbor and his experience has be- tion-exploration of 'strange space
gun to make him professional: designs,' which grew out of a
he is able to work around his own University course in dance com-
difficulties of voice or technique position under the guidance of
and come up with music. Mrs. Elizabeth Bergmann.
His voice is not unfamiliar in There will be a demonstration
the folk field-that combination of some complex handling of
of a coarse blaring, mid-range, movement phrases, with changes
soft fluent highs, and emphatic in use of time, space and effort.
lows. The bite in Franke's. voice 'On the spot' improvisations will
made the Dylan and his own also be included in this first sec-
"Chicken Blues" so effective. He tion of the program.
learned fast last night to keep Mrs. Descutner will then dis-
away from the high notes, which cuss the development of move-
proved none too smooth for him. ment through the use of natural
Banjo and guitar joined the gesture and mood as developed in
bass to accompany his vocal, but the solo "Nothing and Its Possi-
he used them well as filler mate- ilithesporm.ocueswt"
rial indbetween each song. Tun- Teprogram concludes with a
ing, strumming, and playing small work entitled "Water Study"
snatches of tunes plugged all phrey in 192ographed. by Doris Hum-
hnlnc oA laf4-nn hreynrinn1927.o

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Shows Wed., Sat., Sun.
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1 nes auu iuJtbno audience-losing
silence.
Franke's performance was fol-
lowed by a guest appearance of
the duo, Dave Kahn and Bill
Meyers. Their bluesy Southern
folk contrasted sharply with the
big-city flavor of most of Franke's
work. Yet, the almost separate
traditions the two groups follow1
easily complement one another:
the twang of the blues and the
fast pulse of protest music.
There was more than music,
however, last night at Smitty's.
Campus news and petitions min-
gled with the music. Circulating
were petitions both condemning
Apartments Ltd. in support of
the SGC-SHA campaign and ap-
pealing to the judges in Ann Ar-
bor to close the incorrigible cell in
the County Jail. Strange work for
a coffee house, but Smitty's is
of and for students.

"Hello, Dolly," starring Holly-
wood's Dorothy Lamour, has been
added to the Play-of-the-Month
Series at the University's Profes-
sional Theatre Program, Execu-
tive Director Robert C. Schnitzer
an1lounced yesterday.
The hit Broadway musical based
on Thorton Wilder's comedy "The
Matchmaker" will be performed
in Hill Aud. on Sunday, March
1, at 2:30 and 8:30 p.m. Tickets
for both performances will go on
sale immediately at the Hill Aud.
box office.

join The Daily Today!
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leave the children home,

i

I

a

Buddy Guy Blues Band performs at Canterbury House,

A

I

STARTS TODAY at the

Vt Forum'

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Program information * 8-6416
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HELD OVER
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SHOWS AT
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"The Tension Is Terrific i"

"Keeps You Glued To Your Seat !"
-MICHIGAN DAILY

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Next: W. C. FIELDS FESTIVAL

grogram Information 2-6264

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SHOW TIMES:
SAT.:
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SUN.:

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~±g _ 2UE~ nd WEEK!
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This is Benjamin.
U^'C n 441n trnrin .Obll+ hf lfilr~iiCk

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