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February 02, 1968 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-02

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2,1968

THE MICHIGAN DA IL

PAGE IE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2,1968 THE MICHIGAN flAil. VA&E FIVE

STUDENT MOBILIZATION:
World-Wide Protest Called
Against Draft, Imperialism

FREE- SPEECH CURTAILED:
War Troubles Peace Corps

By HARVEY WASSERMAN
CHICAGO (CPS) - More than
900 student activists from the
United States and Latin America
have called for a world-wide stu-
dent strike "against the war in
Vietnam and racism."
The students announced plans
for the strike during a confer-
ence here last weekend sponsored
by the Student Mobilization Com-
mittee, a New York-based organ-
ization which helped plan large-
scale demonstrations in New
and the massive demonstration at
the Pentagon last Oct. 21.
The strike will be held Friday,
April 26, in the midst of 10 days

i

with the "Ten Days to Shake the
Empire" program announced at
a national meeting of Students
for a Democratic Society last De-
cember.
The black caucus at the con-
ference last weekend called its
strike against "imperialism, rac-
ism, and the draft."
Support
The majority of students at-
tending the conference strongly
supported the strike, but there
still was some opposition. The
o p p o s i t i o n centered largely
around charges that the Student
Mobilization Committee is a
"manipulative elitist organization
without a broad-based constitu-

I

of concentrated anti-war activity ency." Some s t u d e n ts also
scheduled from April 20 to April charged that the call for a world-
30. The 10-day period coincides wide strike is a bad tactic because
xOn Declares Candidacy;
Enters N.H. Primary Race

NEW YORK (P) - Richard M.
Nixon announced formally yester-
day that he is a candidate for the
Republican presidential nomina-
tion and said, "I believe I have
found some answers" to the prob-
lems confronting the United
States.
"I have decided, therefore, to
enter the Republican presidential
primary in New Hampshire," his
statement said.
Opens Drive
It was issued in the form of a
letter to the citizens of New Hamp-
shire. Nixon prepared to open his
drive with three days of appear-
ances in that state, beginning to-
day. Prom there, his office said,
he will go to Wisconsin and Okla-
homa.
New Hampshire's p r i m a r y,
scheduled for March -12, is the
nation's first. Wisconsin follows on
* April 2.
In his statement, Nixon said the
United States is in "grave difficul-
ties around the world and here at
home." He said the efforts to find
solutions transcend partisan poli-
tics.
"Peace and freedom in the
world, and peace and progress here
at home," the statement continued,
"will depend on the decisions of
the next president of the United
States.
His immediate objective, as one
of his aides said recently, is to
"bury the loser cliche" with vic-
toies in the primaries. In addi-
tion to the elections in New Hamp-
shire and Wisconsin, Nixon is ex-

pected to ,enter the Indiana, Ne-
braska and Oregon primaries.
Nixon's strategy, his intimates
said, will be to campaign against
President Johnson, not against
Romney or any others who may
contend for the Republican nom-
ination.
Nixon's announcement came as
no surprise. For many months he
has been speaking and writing
about foreign problems-especially
the war in Vietnam - and the
major domestic issues in the Unit-
ed States.
Moreover, various polls showed
him well ahead of Gov. George
Romney of Michigan, the only
other announced candidate for the
GOP nomination, and also leading
those considered potential candi-
dates.
As Nixon declared his candidacy,
the latest Gallup Poll showed him
holding a 3-1 lead over Romney
and a margin of 3 to 2 over Gov.
Nelson A. Rockefeller of New York.
Stress Experience
Nixon reminded the voters of his
14 years of experience in Washing-
ton, during which, he said, "Ij
learned the awesome nature of the
great decisions a president faces."
He went on:
"During the past eight years I
have had the chance to reflect on
the lessons of public office, to
measure the nation's tasks and its
problems from a fresh perspective.
I have sought to apply those les-
sons to the needs of the present,
and to the entire sweep of this
final third of the 20th century.

it does not stem from nor does
it contribute to building the grass
roots anti-war movement.
Chris Hobson, a member of the
SDS chapter at the University of
Chicago, said the strike "would
isolate rather than build the anti-
war movement in that staying out
of classes for a day 'against the
war' is far removed from the
everyday lives and decisions of
the average student."
Hobson encouraged the stu-
dents at the conference to "con-
centrate on local issues showing
how they are tied into the war
and into the society we live in,
and in this way build the con-
sciousness of the movement. We
don't need elite-sponsored gim-
micks that can so easily fail."
Conscience
However, Renaldo Moute, a
Latin American student, said stu-
dents in the United States must
strike "to demonstrate to the
peoples of Latin America, Asia,
and Africa that there are those
iD America who still have a con-
science and who oppose the Imi-
perialist and racist policies per -
petrated by the United States
government all over the world."
A motion to call off the strike
and to dissolve the Student Mo-
bilizationCommittee was round-
ly defeated.
Conference leaders indicated
that local organizers should con-
centrate on local issues during
the 10 days of activities in April,
but that April 26th should be
primarily a day to strike against
the war.
Issues
The Student Mobilization Com-
mittee plans to distribute a gen-
eral sheet of issues around which
local organizers can, center their
discussions. Some of the issues
suggested were demanding an end
to U.S. imperialism; self-deter-
mination for all the people of the
world, an end to campus compli-
city with the war effort, and an
end to the system of conscription.
Attorney Arthur Kinoy, who
spoke at the conference, warned
the students against "allowing
the government to put us on the
defensive." He added, "Our tac-
tics of meeting repression head-
on are hurting them (members
of the Johnson Administration),
and they are scared, badly
scared."
U-

WASHINGTON (CPS)-When
Vice President Hubert Humphrey
visited Africa early this year, a
group of Peace Corps volunteers
in Liberia wanted to meet with
him to discuss their sentiments
against the war in Vietnam.
The volunteers were told by a
top Peace Corps official in Li-
beria that any comment by them
-either public or private-on
Vietnam in the presence of the
Vice President would result in
their immediate termination from
the Peace Corps.
Hesitate
Their story, made public by a
letter to the editor in a recent
issue of the New Republic, is one
example of why many students
today are hesitating to become
part of a program which for the
past seven years has drawn strong
support from the younger gener-
ation.
Within the last nine months,
the Peace Corps has become a
topic of controversy on many col-
lege campuses. Most of the Corps'
problems have been a direct re-
sult of the war in Vietnam.
Questions
Students who consider joining
the Peace Corps now must solve
several ideological que stion s.
Among them are:
-Are volunteers free to present
their views on any topic, no mat-
ter how controversial, as long as

it does not affect their work as
a volunteer?
-Can the United States hon-
estly be working for peace in some
countries of the world, while, at
the same time, dropping napalm
bombs on another country?
-Can volunteers be effective
in their host countries at a time
when the foreign policy of the
United States is becoming more
and more unpopular around the
world?
-If the Central Intelligence
Agency was able to infiltrate pri-
vate organizations such as the
National Student Association,
what, then, would keep it from
infiltrating government agencies
like the Peace Corps?
Free Speech
Of these possible problems, the
"free speech controversy" has at-
tracted the most attention and
seems to be the most pressing.
The second is primarily a person-
al question which the individual
must answer for himself. And the
last two have been widely dis-
cussed, but there is no evidence
to indicate that either is valid.
The fact that an increasing
number of young people think
they would lose their freedom of
speech by joining the Peace Corps
is supported by a recent Louis
Harris survey. The survey showed
about 20 per cent of college sen-
iors expressed this fear, compared

with only two per cent a year ago.
The survey was taken after a
major free speech issue involving
the Corps last summer. The inci-
dent occurred when a group of,
volunteers in Santiago circulated
the "Negotiations Now" petition
protesting the U.S. position in
Vietnam. Corps officials told the
volunteers to withdraw their
names or submit their resigna-
tions. Volunteers also were told
they could not identify them-
selves as working for the Peace
Corps when writing for the Amer-
ican press.
One volunteer in Chile, Bruce
Murray, wrote a letter to Peace
Corps Director Jack Vaughn pro-
testing the action. Murray's letter
was subsequently printed in the
Chilean press, after which he was
called to Washington and noti-
fied he was being dismissed as
a volunteer. Corps officials said
Murray defied a standard policy
that volunteers not become in-
volved in "local political issues."
The Peace Corps is still try-
ing. to recover from the Murray
incident. Vaughn now emphasizes
the "great freedom" which volun-
teers have. "We don't tell vol-
unteers what they can or can't
discuss, and we don't intend to,"
he said in an interview. "We
send the volunteers out to carry
.a message according to what they
believe in, not to shut up."

'ADULTS OL
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AFTER HOURS
Every Friday and Saturday Nite
1 :30 to 4:00 a.m.
featuring
THE PRIME MOVERS
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Cover only $1.00
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READ AND USE DAILY, CLASSIFIED ADS
FRIDAY NIGHT
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Thursday, Feb. 1-Stan VanDerBeek
will appear in person, at Cinema Guild
Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 2 and 3
MR. ARKADIN
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For program information, 662-8871
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LOU RAWLS
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February 12-24
Special student prices Monday-Thursday
ELMWOOD CASINO, Windsor, Ontario
Reservations (Detroit) WO 5-6876

A representative of the
PURDUE UNIVERSITY
KRANNERT GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF INDUSTRIAL ADMINISTRATION
will be in the Engineering Placement Office on
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8
to talk with those interested in an
intensive one year program leading to a

WE'RE LEAVING!
Present s t a f f removed
bawdily to Ann Arbor
Jail - Come and take

your place
martyrs -
positions on

among the
petition for
the Garg.

0

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
INDUSTRIAL ADMINISTRATION

I

r

i

11

I PETITIONS DUE FEB. 14I
Joi
The Daily
SSports Staff'

TONIGHT

I VW VIGIL T /;)Go

r

PETITIONS FOR
NEW POLITICS
meet at 109 Miller
Sat. 11:00 A.M.,
Sun. noon
Transportation:
Call 971-2856

ANDOR CZOMPO

World's Greatest Teacher

OSCAR WILDE'S

of Hungarian Folkdancing and Folklore

GERMANY 2 MONTHS JULY-AUG.
$600.00 includes Jet-fare, accommodations,
trips to other countries.
German or French language course timesweekly.
$60.00 per course due February 28.
Contact: J. D. GRIFFITH
582 Howard Avenue
Staten Island, New York 10301

BARBOUR GYM

8-12 P.M.
$1

_.__

.. .by
our faculty's own
l- LORD CHAMBERLAIN PLAYERS
Lt Thurs., Fri., Sat., Feb. 1-3
8:00-foyer of Angell Hall
FOR SATURDAY ONLY
Tickets: $1.00at Union desk
UAC

;

' _ " , '

Im

STUDENTS
WHO HAVE BEEN

wrCLAUDE BROWN
Author of the best - selling novel,
: Manchild in the Promised Land and
C 04 spokesman for our generation's ghetto
Negroes. Brown will talk on "Art in
Contemporary Negro Literature."
S, u
f- - Sunday, February 4

REFUSED

8:00-Union

Ballroom

UNION-LEAGUE

REGISTRATION
IN AA-CALL SGC OFFICES

Looking for an

Reception following lecture,
Union Assembly Room

No Admission

UAC|

JAN. 30-FEB. 2,9:30 A.M.-4:30 P.M.
663-0553
FOR AID IN OBTAINING
YOUR RIGHT TO VOTE

International Experience?
TRY THE 1968 WORLD'S FAIR

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DETROIT'S UNDERGROUND MOVIE HOUSE
presents
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Friday,

1 P.M. to

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12 noon to
12 midnight

Saturday,

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in
"THE PHARMACIST,"
"CAPTAIN MARVEL," "PERILS OF PAULINE"

12 Midnight

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11

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