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January 30, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-30

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1868

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1968 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE'

Allies Halt Cease-Fire

Dr. Spoek
Enters Plea
Of Not Guilty
F Pi T

LA Y-OFFS CONTINUE:
GM, UAW Settle
Foundry Strikes

On Vietnam
Fear"Massivi
SAIGON (/P) -Priming for a an invasion," a U.S. senio
major battle, the allies canceled said in Saigon of ther
their 36-hour Tet cease-fire along troop massing. "It is no
the northern frontiers yesterday just infiltration."
after detecting fresh North Viet- At Khe Sanh in Sout
namese troops in position for nam's northwest corner of
massive attack. They also ordered the Marine combat base1
continued truce-period air attacks sociated Press corresponde
in North Vietnam's southern pan- Arnett the attack mayc
handle. the end of this week, w
"It is something I would label Communists' unilateral
day cease-fire ends.
The allied truce obse;
Clifford other parts of South
the lunar new year f
ends at 6 a.m. Wednesday
O ines EST today.
The announcement ex
TT~ lJ the 1st Corps area and th
SU .S. O c ern panhandle from truc
sions came from the Sou

Borders;
eAttack
ir officerlet the enemy have 36 hours of
northern resupply and movement while we
longer sit there and get hit," a U.S. sen-
ior officer in Saigon commented.
h Viet- The announcement said U.S.
ficers at planes, while observing truce pro-
told As- visions in other parts of North
nt Peter Vietnam, would continue bomb-
come at ing runs in a 125-mile stretch
hen the between the DMZ and the North's
seven - coastal city of Vinh.
"It is a source of genuine regret
rved in the enemy's actions have neces-
nam for sitated these defensive measures
estivities and have made impossible the:
-5 p.m. peaceful observance of the tra-'
ditional Tet holiday in these
empting areas," the allied announcement
e south- said.
e provi- "Only the size of the forth-
th Viet- coming fighting is in doubt," one'
commander at Khe Sanh told
Arnett. "I would say it will be a
cross between the worst at Dak
Viet- To and the battle of Dien Bien
guyen Phu."
r to- Dak To was the scene of a ser-
xew ies of bloody hill battles in No-
celled to the Republic of Vietnam that
y be- vember along the South Vietna-
Com- mese-Laotian border. Dien Bien{
Phu was the battle won by the
Viet Minh in 1954 which brought1
aid the an end to the French colonial era1
use ob- in Indochina. One of the enemy
would units detected in the northern
merican area, the 304th Division, took part{
enders. in the massive attack on thet
gical to French at Dien Bien Phu.k

-Associated Press
A CHILD OF THE WAR
A Vietnamese boy faces the business end of an M-79 grenade
launcher held on the hip of a U.S. soldier. The boy and his family
are refugees, evacuated from their home village of Phuoc Than
on the South Vietnamese coast 370 miles north of Saigon.
Congress Impanient
Over Pueblo Crisis

racesrison .1 ermi, DETROIT PA') - The first of
Fine, For Advocating 117,900 United Auto workers be-
gan returning to their jobs yes-
Resistance to Draft terday at General Motors, fol-;
BOSTON (A) - Dr. Benjamin.lowing the settlement Sunday of
Spock kndfourothermenpead two of the firm's three crippling
inpockndfouethermenoeaedfoundry strikes.
innocent yesterdayou tocharesothe Company spokesmen, however,
counselingyoun men to anidthed declined to predict when all
draft. The pleas, which included workers, including 106,700 idled,
one by the chaplain of Yale Uni- by parts shortages resulting from
versity, were entered during a brief the walkouts, could resume nor-
arraignment in U.S. District court mal work schedules.
as demonstrators marched outside In Detroit, meanwhile, negotia-
in their support. tions continued until 12:30 yes-
Judge Francis J. W. Ford ordered terday morning in efforts to reach
the defendants released in $1,000 settlement on the third strike at
bail each and told lawyers for the the firm's Chevrolet foundry at
defense and prosecution he wanted Tonawanda, N.Y.
trial to begin by spring. Local Contracts
Conviction carries a maximum ILocal agreements to supple-
penalty of up to five years in ment the union's national con-
prison and a $10,000 fine, tract with the giant automaker
Request Delays were overwhelmingly ratified by
Defense lawyers requested 60 workers at GM's key Central Di-
days to file motions, but the judge vision foundry in Defiance, Ohio,t
allowed them 30. When the prose- and Chevrolet Grey Iron foundry
cution asked for 30 days after that in Saginaw, Mich. p n
for replies, Judge Ford said he! The UAW said 90 per cent oft
would allow 20. the production workers and 78
"If I allow all this time for these per cent of the skilled workers
so called motions," he said "this approved the contract at Defi-F
case will spring right into sum- ance, where some 2,000 had been'
mer. on strike for 12 days.1
Ford said he would set a trial The vote at Saginaw, where
- date after considering motions of 6.900 workers walked out 11 days
both sides. ago, was 95 per cent of the pro-!
e Four Indicted duction workers and 88 per cente
h Under indictment with the 64- of the skilled tradesmen, the un-c
- year-old pediatrician are the Rev. ion said.f
Willn"-% ''nono f~nf " v Altx~ai Tn T~c.

WASHINGTON (R) - A State
Departmentspokesman endorsed
yesterday the view that North
Vietnam could continue to supply
normal munitions and fighting
men to Communist forces in,
South Vietnam without affecting
negotiations after a cessation of
U.S. bombing attacks.
State Department officials deny
that this view, first expressed by
Secretary of Defense-designate
Clark Clifford, represents any
new concession by President John-
son. They contend it is simply a
spelling out of the formula John-
son expressed in a San Antonio
speech last September.
Appearing before the Senate
Armed Services Committee last
week, Clifford indicated that the
United States has not insisted
that North Vietnam cut off its
troops fighting in South iVetnam.
'"I assume that they will con-
tinue to transport the normal
amount of goods, munitions, men,
to South iVetnam," Clifford said.
"I assume that we will continue
to maintain our forces and sup-
port our forces during the bomb-
ing halt, but there was no gen-
eral ceasefire.",
Press.Officer Robert J. Mc-
Closkey said yesterday that what
Clifford said "is certainly con-
sistent with the San Antonio
formula."

BULLETIN
SAIGON (M)-South
namese President Ng
Van Thieu announced
day that the allied luna
year cease fire was can
throughout the country
cause of widespread+
munist attacks.
namese government. It s
decision was taken beca
servance of a cease-fire
have risked the lives of A
and South Vietnamese def
"It is not militarily lo

Workers there gradually began
returning to work yesterday and
today, and other workers laid off
as a result of the parts shortage
"will be called back as soon as we
can get to refill the parts pipe-
line," a spokesman said.
He declined to say how long
this might be, and added more
GM assembly plant workers
might be laid off as further parts
shortages temporarily occur.
Court Rule
Against Tax
On Ga-mblers
WASHINGTON ({P)- T h e
Supreme Court yesterday upset
the government's system of flush-
ing out gamblers for prosecution
by requiring them to register and
to pay special taxes.
If the gamblers obey these laws,
Justice John M. Harlan said in
a 7-1 decision, they provide evi-
dence that could lead to their own
prosecution under separate state
and federal anti-gambling laws.
Thus, in view of the Fifth
Amendment guarantee against
self incrimination, Harlan went
on, a gambler cannot be punished
for refusing on constitutional
grounds to register or to pay the
special taxes.
The various registration and
tax regulations have been a signi-
ficant source of income for the
federal government.
At the end of his decision, Har-
lan said the court is not prevent-
ing Congress from regulating or
taxing illegal activities. But the
methods, he said, must be "entire-
ly consistent with constitutional
limitations."
In two other significant rulings
the court threw out Chicago's
movie censorship law and cut into
the power of state prosecutors to
shield the identity of police in-
formants at trial.
"To forbid this rudimentary in-
quiry . . . is effectively to emas-
culate the right of cross-examina-
tion itself," wrote Justice Potter
Stewart.

WASHINGTON (A)--While some
Congress members showed grow-
ing impatience. the White House
pressed ahead yesterday with
backstage diplomatic efforts to re-
solve the USS Pueblo crisis.
Presidential p r e s s secretary
George Christian said a number
of diplomatic cannels are active,
but at the same time he said the

United States is making "pru-
dent, orderly, and limited deploy.
ment" of military forces in the
Korean crisis area.
U.S. troops along the North
Korea-South Korea truce line re-
ported Monday they. beat bac
several infiltration attempts from
the North.
The United Nati ons cui ty

k(
n7

wimlams Sloane Coffn jr. 43,
chaplain at Yale University: Mi-
chael Ferber, 23, of Boston, grad-
uate student at Harvard Univer-

FA VORS PRO-CHINA POLICY:

Council, apparently frustrated in sity; Mitchell Goodman, 44, an
its search for a solution, called off author, of New York City and
its New York meetings indefinite- Temple, Maine; and Marcus Rask-
ly to enable consultations to con- in, 33, of Washington, D.C., co-

Castro Institutes Party Purge
As Soviet-Cuban Ties Worsen

Associated Press News Analysis
Fidel Castro, reacting to chal-
lenges within his Communist par-
ty by instituting a broad purge,
seems bent on turning his island
into a little China within the Red
world, at the risk of severely
straining already aggravated re-
lations with the Soviet Union.

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
BEERSHEBA, Israel - Mrs.
David Ben Gurion, wife of Israel's
first prime minister, died yester-
day following a brain hemhorrage.
She was 76.
Mrs. Ben Gurion collapsed Sun-
day at her home in a Negev Desert
kibbutz. Ben Gurion, 82, accom-
panied her to a Beersheba hospital
where she died.
She was born Pola Munwess in
Minsk, Russia, and married the
Zionist leader in New York in
1917. She was a student in Brook-
lyn when she met Ben Gurion.
Mrs. Ben Gurian was at her hus-
band's side during his long polit-

ical career and accompanied him
on almost all his trips abroad.
* * *
TEL AVIV, Israel-The army re-
ported yesterday it has smashed
an Arab sabotage organization in
Gaza City following a swoop in
which security troops arrested 71
Arabs and seized large arms
caches.
The whole organization, includ-
ing its commanders, was netted in
coordinated night raids around the
troublesome town four days ago,
an army spokesman said. The raid
on the group, identified as El Ko-
mion Arab-The Arab Nationalists
-followed several weeks of terror-
ist activity in the Gaza strip.

The announcement of a trial
for nine 'old' Communists, mean-
ing those following Moscow's line,
is likely to be received with anger
in the Kremlin, whose economic
and military aid support the Cas-
tro regime.
Castro evidently feels he can
play with this political dynamite
on the assumption that Moscow
has no option except to continue
supporting his regime as the only
island of communism in the
Western Hemisphere.
Cuba depends upon the Soviet
Union and Communist nations as
markets for agricultural products
an'd as sources of military aid.
There is no precise figure on
what aid to Cuba costs the Rus-
sians, but it. must be well in ex-
cess of $1 million a day.
For years Moscow has displayed
irritation at the state of the Cu-
ban economy, the way economic
aid was used, and the effects of
Castro's expensive adventures in
subversion abroad.
Moscow has been advising
Cuba's Communists to "build so-
cialism" first before going all out
to export revolution. But like
China's Communists, Castro es-
r

poused constant armed struggle as
communism's only future.
Chief purge trial defendant will
be Anibal Escalante, who was
secretary general of the Integrat-
ed Revolutionary Organizations
(ORD - in the early days of the
regime. He clashed with Castro
as early as 1961. Now he may face
the death penalty.I
Castro cracked down on "old"
Communists in March 1962. He
dissolved ORI and set up the
United Cuban Revolutionary par-
ty with himself as its chief.1 He
banished Escalante, who went to
Czechoslovakia and then Poland
and Russia.
Escalante did not return until
1965, by which time there was a
deep rift in Castro's party.
Last month he openly paraded
his defiance of the Kremlin, re-
marking acidly that Marxism
"should conduct itself like a revo-
lutionary force and not like a
pseudo-revolutionary church."
"We hope," he added, "that our
saying these things will not bring
our excommunication nor, , of
course, bring the Holy Inquisition
down on us."

tinue "on an urgent basis."c
The Council was called intoI
emergency session last Friday at
the request of the United States. I
President Ponders
Christian said President John-'
son spent much of the weekend1
conferring on the problem posed;
by North Korea's seizure a week
ago of the electronic intelligence
ship Pueblo and its crew of 83
Americans.
Amid the welter of suggestions
on how to deal with the situation,J
the administration appears de-
termined to press every effort for
a peaceful way out, while still
making a few preliminary mili-
tary preparations.
In Congress, Senate Republican
Leader Everett M. Dirksen of Illi-
nois said "I don't disdain diplo-
matic efforts, but I want to be
sure that North Korea does not
get the idea they can get away
with this."
Dirksen Diplomacy
Declaring "We've been treated
to a king-sized dose of caution
from some quarters," Dirksen said:
the issue is simple: "A U.S:.vessel,
its skipper and crew have been hi-
jacked on the high seas and im-
prisoned in an enemy land."
"Let's not be impatient, they
say," Dirksen said. "Don't be rash.
Enlist the offices of the United
Nations. Enlist the cooperation of
the Soviet Union."
Dirksen said he doesn't want
anyone to get the idea that "we're
1 going to take this lying down."

Al E

I

director of the Institute for Po-
licy Studies.
The indictments returned Jan. 5
by a federal grand jury in Boston
charged the five with violating the
Selective Service Act by conspiring
to counsel young men to avoid the
draft.
Outside. 200 persons, young
bearded men, long haired girls,
housewives and businessman types
marched around the courthouse as
75 policemen kept them separated
from about 100 pro Vietnam dem-
onstrators.

wasnup time
Under the Defiance pact, work-
ers will get three minutes of paid
washup time before lunch periods,
three minutes less than they had
been demanding.
No details of the Saginaw set-
tlement were immediately avail-
able, but it was believed to con-
tain similar language. Washup
time was the key issue at all
three foundries.
Negotiators were scheduled to
resume talks at 1 p.m. yesterday
in the Tonawanda strike, which
began 10 days ago and has idled
2,300 workers since Jan..19.
The settlements at the Saginaw
and Defiance foundries, which
produce cast metal parts, primar-
ily engine castings, affected pro-
duction for all lines of the com-
pany's cars, a spokesman said.

presents
MUSIC FROM MARLBORO
OF THE MARLBORO MUSIC FESTIVAL
SUNDAY AFTERNOON, FEB. 4 at 2:30
in RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
PROGRAM: Instrumental and Vocal-lute Trio in G (Haydn); Ballads and
Romances (Brahms); "Kakadu" Variations (Shostakovich); Songs on Hebrew
Folk Themes.
Tickets: Limited number at $5 00 Standing Room, $1.00
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER
(Hours: Mon. througl Fri., 9 to 4:30; Sat., 9 to 12
Also at Rackham Auditorium 1%/ hours preceding each performance.)

i

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z - -- - r

M-16's jam -

- -

Shovels don't

PEACE CORPS

Jan. 29-Feb. 2
3529 S.A.B.

ONCE FESTIVAL
ELECTRONIC MUSIC THEATER
Thurs., Feb. 8 Fri., Feb. 9 Sat., Feb. 10 Michigan Union Ballroom
ONCE GROUP ONCE GROUP SONIC ARTS GROUP (N.Y.) 8:30 P.M.
(Repeated performance-
Audience limited)
$2.00 Students/$1.50. . . at MICHIGAN UNION, DISCOUNT RECORDS,
CENTICORE BOOK SHOP and PLASTER OF PARIS (Maynard Street)
in cooperation with the UM Creative Arts Festival

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THE PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PRQGRAM
In Cooperation With
THE CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
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THE MOST ACCLAIMED MUSICAL IN THEATRE HISTORYI

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Sfeet
Chari
THE STORY OF A GIRL
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FRIDAY, SATURDAY,
1 P.M.lo 12 Noon to
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