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January 28, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-28

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

wa rxYfl Aar ?ATVT AY .. -- "'. ---

PAGE WO T E MI H --- ---I-V

-SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, 1968

arts festival
Makeba Opens Creative Arts Program
By JIM PETERS of Chad, the ancient Zulu king, constant flow of rhythm to keep
When she talks about each song preparations for battle, work and the mood intact.
-fragments of conversation min- hunts. This gifted Makeba was The music never stopped within
gled with pulsating music-her born in Johannesburg and spent Miss Makeba. Whether pausing
voice coaxes out each word slowly most of her life at Pretoria in the between numbers to take a breath,

Residential College Instructors
See Need for Course Resliaping
(Continued from Page 1) as antattempt "to integrate five can teach this specially-designed
dents responded much better in separate social sciences into one course within a framework like the
such a closed group." couhse" with some of the "big- college."
Replacing freshman seminar on gest names" in the University Hege.
the Residential College schedule are teachg it iv He says the course will em-
the teaching it. i.C7P "vn~ t,,,~rns,.

and hesitatingly; it never betrays
the fire and intensity within the
slender torch called Miriam Ma-
keba.
Last night at Hill Aud in the
first event of the Creative Arts
Festival, Miriam Makeba flew, and
it was the combination of musical
power, a receptive audience, and
her own individual sensitivity that
sent her gliding. From her own na-
tive South Africa to the like-
rhythms of Brazil, touching down
around the world, Miss Makeba
sampled all the flavor of the
humid, misty tropical jungles
which seem to incite her.
The stage at Hill was empty ex-
cept for a few instruments huddled
to one side. There were only three
musicians, Miss Makeba, and the
music. Electric bass and a per-
cussion combo of conga drums,
cymbal and snare drum provided
the brittle, now well-known Latin
beat, but the sympathetic guitar of
one called Sibuka supplied the
mood and tone in each number.
Makeba's selections were taken
mainly from and told of Africa,

Transvaal-areas segregated under
the South African government's
policy of apartheid.
The misery and longing result-
ing from this condition-the real
suffering of her friends and fam-
ily-fashions songs such as "When
I Pass On" and "This Piece of
Ground" and a song whose refrain
summarizes the desire of thwarted
African nationalism-"Unify This
Promised Land."
Miss Makeba used language
last night. African songs in Zulu,
and Xosa (the "X" in Xosa stands
for that undefinable click sound),
and melodies in Spanish, Portu-
gese and English were fused into
one international expression of
human emotion through the med- I
ium of Miss Makeba's voice, un-
strained in any language.
Her musicians were internation-
al as well. A Brazilian guitarist,
a Puerto Rican drummer, and a
bass player from New York seem-
ed to' take the spirit of the rhythm
and the feeling of the music from
Makeba. They accompanied her,
singing and speaking, providing a

nr Q7cri-m" c'nmrf Ste: vim ..5. -, 1---' 1

or saying something about hert
next song, or merely waitingt
through a musical introduction,
she was moving. Turning, waving,
half-dancing, just simply mov-
ing, she expressed her enthusiasm
vocally too.
Her last "official" number be-
fore the encore was pure soundI
unhindered by language-groans,
calls and her famous clicking
sounds tumbled on one another
as the music and her own body
contortions moved faster and
faster until all! collapsed in one
releasing sigh. Though the three-
girl chorus used near the end
seemed vulgarsand totally unsuit-
ed to Miss Makeba's style, the
total woman that is Makeba en-
dures all things. And the encore,
prompted by the audience's rounds
of standing applause, shouted out
through her soft voice her true
encompassing ability.j

this semester is a course in human
behavior. O'Cleireacain defines it
Creative Arts
Festival
Sunday, Jan. 28
ART BUCHWALD "Son of
the Great Society."
Hill Aud., 8 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 29-
PETER ARNOTT, puppeteer'
presents "Dr. Fautus":
Aud. A, Angell Hall, 8 p.m.
NATHAN MILSTEIN, vio-
linist:
Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 30
HERB DAVID and PETER
GRIFFITH, guitarists;
Union Ballroom, 8 p.m.

"It's certainly an ambitious
course-perhaps too ambitious for
the first year," he says. "But in
time we'll draw on experience and
improve it. One problem is I'm
supposed to pull in material from
five areas, and I've come into the
course with absolutely no back-
ground.
At present there is no inter-
departmental science program in
the Residential College. According
to Robertson, he has recruited a
professor to initiate a special zo-
ology couinse next fall who is com-
ing to the University "just so he
TTEaTh
N n[

Pli ze more processes than
skills" and that it will discuss the
living system "from the chemistry
and physics standpoint, including
the issues of modern biology. It
will be set up either simultane-
ous'y os as a pre-requisite with our
own special Zoology 106 course
that we'll also start next fall."
"Our original hope was to set up
an inter-disciplinary course that
was very complete within the Col-
lege.' says Robertson. "But we
we, en't able to get enough money
to do what we wanted. At least
we' e doing something experi-
mental.
TODAY!

e Man with

*

I

INV I

Name Ret

urns

-Daily-Jay Cassidy
SOUTH AFRICAN FOLKSINGER Miriam Makeba sang last night
at Hill Aud. The concert was the first event of the Creative Arts.
Festival, which runs through Feb. 13.

Phone 434-0130
James H Nicholsons Samuel ZArlo"f .PSYCHEDELIG
liw~_ COLOR
PETER FONDA Enta4" O. CARPENTER ROAD
STRASBERG AT
8:30

cinema
'Privilege': Fearful Step Into Mind Control

ULINT EASTWVOOD
"THlE GOOD,
THE BGLY
co-starrn
AN CLEEF Diree
alostarring SER
LWAUACHTEC-
in the role of Tuco EC

by
610L[ON[
HNISCOPE*
HNICOLORO
N[~TIE)

PLUS..
In Color

TRUNK TO CAIRO

with
AUDIE MURPHY

By DANIEL OKRENT
British director Peter Watkins,
whose "The War Game" took
reviewers on a dizzying ride into
a future of worldwide holocaust,
now takes another fearful step
beyond the dotted-line limita-
tions of our current culture with
"Privilege," now playing at the
Fifth Forum.
"Privilege" is horror-a total-
ly, brutally exacting film that
dashes the participant's sensibil-
ities (you do not merely "watch"
this movie, it requires-rather,
forces -involvement). As it ex-
amines the life of a pop idol
(played convincingly by Paul
Jones, and. loved by luscious art-
Gorky's Yo
Before the
By MARGARET WARNER
In the first film of the Gorky
Triology, Russian director Mark
Donsky combines the aesthetic aim
of presenting the magnificence of
human life with the somewhat
subtler political aim of describing
the pride and anguish of the
downtrodden proletariat in czarist
Russia.
"The Childhood of Gorky,"
playing at Cinema Guild tonight,
desribes the tangled early life of
the man later to become a cen-;
tral literary and political figure of
the Russian Revolution. Gorky
lived much of his youth amid the
petty rivalries of his inheritance-
:ungry uncles, the ludicrous
angers of his grandfather and all
of the passionate brawling and
bumbling of a country Russian
family.
At first the film seems to wan-
der effortlessly through a montage
of Gorky's memories, neither find-
ing nor needing direction in the
richnes of the description of the
passions and idiosyncracies inher-
ent in the Russian peasant's life.
However, true to "socialist real-
Ism," Donsky's characterization
soon split into two distinct cate-
gories.
On the onehand, Gorky's father
and uncles, representing the evils
of the old Russia, are presented
as petty, argumentative and eter-
nally concerned with money. But
the vulnerable and exploited char-
acters who show up throughout
the film are presented as possess-
ors of the true strength of the
Russian character.
With joy and resignation, the
exploited exude a geniality and
mutual concern which makes their
lives, though filled with suffering,
infinitely richer than those of their
quibbling exploiters. But Donsky's
heroes do not complain or revolt.
In one of Donsky's strongest

q

ist Jean Shrimpton) from behind,
in front of, and through his
mind, it chills and terrifies.
We are in Great Britain, in a
year in the future. Steve Shorter,
"Birmingham's Boy," returns
from an American tour to Brit-
ain's first ticker tape parade.
Then he gives a concert, visits
one of 300 Steve Shorter disco-
theques, tours one of the 300
adjoining Steve Shorter Dream
Palaces, meets with the board of
Steve Shorter Enterprises, Inc.,
and trembles, bites his lip, and
swallows hard during each agon-
izing moment. He watches from
aside as he is primped and pump-
ed and primed by his press secre-
uth: Misery
Revolution
scenes, a servant of Gorky's fam-
ily is required to carry a huge cross
up the hill to place it on the grave
of one of Gorky's aunts. It is ex-
plained to Gorky that his uncle
feels guilty for having beaten his
wife to death. During the climb,
the servant slips and is crushed
under the weight of the cross.
Only the child Gorky takes
seriously the moral of his grand-
mother's folk tale-that a man
should "Hearken not to evil orders
and hide not behind another's con-
science." Gorky, future poet and
revolutionary, leaves his homeland
to begin a new life.

tary, his personal secretary, his
music publisher, his musical di-
rector, his "board."
Yet, through it all, Steve Short-
er cannot summon up the fire
to stand up. His reduction by his
manipulators to the position of
figurine is complete. And the
manipulators are only using
Shorter as a device for furthe;
manipulation, the film's concep-
tual genius.
Steve Shorter is manipulated
to renew the spirits of a flagging
Britain, to save the morals, the
principles, the values of British
society. The distinguished pro-
fessor who sits on the board puts
it quite simply: "We have to
stop the communism and anarchy
in our youth."
All along,,he has been repre-
senting the violent emotions of
British youth, serving as an out-
let for their "unBritish feelings
as he gives concerts while locked
in a jail cell on stage, tormented
by sadistic guards. But then the
manipulators, having established
Shorter as the hero-object of
Britain's empathy, begin to weave
another plot.
In concert with the "Combined
Church of England," Steve Short-
er drops his image of youthful
rebellion and violence (estab-
lished to get British teenagers to
let out their violent feelings
through adultation of the pop-
messiah) and-He Repents.
Through , the dynamic editing
of John Trumper, there is not a
moment in the film that strays

from the ever-downward path of
relentless, inevitable doom. The
collected effect of frenzy and hys-
teria is all-inclusive. There is no
pause, no unrelated comic relief,
no extended, extraneous love-
making. Each kiss or embrace is
necessary and to the point.
At the film's close, Steve
Shorter finally speaks up (egged
on by the appropriately under-
played" Miss Shrimpton) He re-
gurgitates his previous accept-
ance of the Adoration, and asks
not to be considered as a God,
but as more-as aperson.
The theme is not totally unre-
alistic nor unforeseeable. Right
now, our popular entertainment
idols are not direct outgrowths
of unbeatable church-government
propaganda coalitions("one faith,
one God, one flag"). But Wat-
kins quite convincingly impresses
his audience that if the medium
for mind control is available,
there is no better choice avail-
able than a pop idol. Sort of like
a Vietnam-visiting, patriotism-
inspiring Bob Hope on a much
larger, much more frightening
scale.
U

DIAL
5-6290

4th JOLTING WEEK
Ask anyone who has seen it
. . . then YOU'LL know why
we're holding it over!
SH

I Ui

L
OWS AT
1,3,5,
, 9 P.M.
-N.Y. TIMES

I

fMA

3 SHOWS DAILY
Except Fri. & Sat.
1:45-5:00-8:05

I

"The Tension Is Terrific I"

1

TODAY at 1,
3 5 7 9 P.M. '!k au'
"RITA AND LYNN ARE SMASHING!
-N.Y. Daily News

DIAL
8-641'6

"Keeps You Glued To Your Seat I"
-MICHIGAN DAILY
RIECHARD E N A

T(1

FWMT UNTIL na c

1

Next: W. C. FIELDS FESTIVAL

i

"GOES WAY OUT FOR MOD!-WILD SLAPSTICK!"
-N.Y. Daily News

MI "WILDLY BROADMUGGING! PELL MELL MOMENTUM!
MODNESS PERVADES." -N. Y. Times

THE PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
In Cooperation With
THE CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
PRESENTS
THE MOST ACCLAIMED MUSICAL IN THEATRE HISTORY!

"More belly laughs per minute
than in any new film in town!
Daffy, wonderful, cleverly direct-
ed. -Cue Magazine

CARlO PONTI andSEWUR PRODUCTIONS INC present
mamliM ? I~weM

IF YOU MISSED
S._yr ,a ba

I

i

Vth Forum,

210 S. FIFTH AVE.
761-9700

INPARIS, LONDON OR ROME
(or during its current record-breaking N. Y.run)

SHOW TIMES: MON. thru THUR. 7:00, 9:00
FRI. & SAT. 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11-SUN. 1, 3, 5, 7, 9
SNEAK PREVIEW TONIGHT AT 9:00 P.M.
"The most: interesting film released in the U.S. this year. Full of
effective cinematic innovations. PRIVILEGE is excellent. It is full of
satirical cynicism. PRIVILEGE will shake you up ..."
-FILMS IN REVIEW
". remarkable . . . unmistakable brilliance . . . it is a striking
film, a moving piece of work to watch .. ." Penelope Gilliat.
-THE NEW YORKER
". .moves boldly, searchingly - and often amusingly and
searingly - in areas previously untouched by feature film-makers
-Arthur Knight, SATURDAY REVIEW
"One to see for its- unique subject. Some overwhelming scenes
depicting frenzy anguish and cold terror of the mind. "
-CUE MAGAZINE
"..has brilliance and startling satiric bite . . . This vigorous
protest picture generates reason and power .. .
-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. TIMES
HE ENTERTAINED...CAPTIVATED...
THEN BETRAYED I

i

A

IS COMING DIRECT FR OMNEW YORK!

I

MONDAY-TUESDAY
FEB. 5-6

HILL AUDITORIUM
8:30 P.M.

PLAY OF THE MONTH SUBSCRIPTIONS
STILL AVAILABLE
At P.T.P. Ticket Office-Mendelssohn Theatre
Hill Auditorium Box Office Open Weekdays
For Individual Sales-Beginning Wed., Jan. 31

1111

<.k vIL

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