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January 21, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-21

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.4TTNlnav_ IANTAR.'V a.rt _ i ahA

'71 :

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILV ~TThZflAV TA~rTTA11'~Y '~1 1Bi~o

a i Ltix, .1ti1VUAItY ;G 1, lyb2S

dance
Novel Interpretation

NATfONAL GENERAL CORPORATION

art
Highlights Japanese Prints at Art Museum

F'OX EASTERN THEATR Upm
FOR VIL I E
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769.1300 1:1-
usave the children home".

NOW SHOWING___
Feature Times:
3:15-5:15-7:00-9:00

: . ti -'--r.. -:- .. .-,.

Indian Dance Performance

i

-Daily-Jay Cassidy
APPEARING LAST NIGHT at the- Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre,
Mrs. Sudha Sekhar gave a performance of Indian classical dances
(Bharata Natyam). The dance was sponsored by the India.
Students Association.
music
Chicago's Little* Smhony
Performs W1th Precision

By SURI
An exciting and most enjoyable
evening of Indian classical dances
was arranged last night by the In-
dia Students' Association at the
Lydia Mendelssohn theatre.
Inspite of the many other pro-
grammes on campus, the theatre
was almost completely filled. Mrs.
Sudha Chandrasekhar thrilled the
audience with her skill and original
representation of various moods.
The program was all the more
enjoyable because at the begin-
ning of each number, Mrs. Sekhar
gave a brief introduction explain-
ing the highlights of the partic-
ular dance.
Mrs. Sekhar is an economics
graduate from Bombay University
and an ardant devotee of the an-
cient and most traditional classical
:iance of India, Bharata Natyam.
By her grace, charm, originality
and ease, Mrs. Sekhar won the
hearts of the large audience.
One must make special mention
of the "Kumbha Nritya," where
extreme control over her body
movements were clearly depicted,
and of the Aandal Nrityam, the
concluding number.
A point of special mention about
Mrs. Sekhar's performance: Very
few dancers in India are at ease
at both Bharata Natyam and
Kuchipoodi. Mrs.Sekhar possesses
that rare gift and that made her
programme all the more appealing.
Indian classical dance is by no
means simple. It takes rigorous
and strenouous training, and Mrs.
Sekhar spends at least eight hours
a day in her dance practice.
All in all, Mrs. Sekhar's perform-
ance in Ann Arbor was unique and
will be long remembered.
Indian Classical Dance
The two styles of Indian clas-
sical dances that Mrs. Sekhar per-
formed last night are Bharata
Natyam and Kuchipoodi.
Bharata Natyam is basically an
Indian ballet, which gives depth to
such music through vivid facial
and bodily expression. It is char-
acterised by vigourous movements,
fast' rhythm and gay abandon.
The graceful postures, intense fa-
cial expressions and hand gestures
)r "Mudras" make Bharatan
Natyam an aesthetic delight.
Kuchipoodi is an offshoot of
Bharata Natyam, but unlike the
later was originally performed by
male artists from the state of
Andhra Pradesh, in India. Music,
dance and drama are richly com-
bined in this form of dance.
The Artist
Mrs. Sekhar started learning
dancing at the early age of five,
and gave her first public perform-
ance when she was eight years old.
Mrs. Sekhar spent over 18 years
in attaining excellence in these;
two forms. Indian classical dan
cing. She occupies a unique place
in the world of Indian classical
dancing. She gave over 600 per-
formances in India between 1958
and 1967, collecting more than half
a million rupees for charities. This
bears adequate testimony of her
high calibre. She strives in her
zeal for greater and greater per-
fection.
Not only is she an artist, but a
choreographer, par excellence too.

EDITOR'S NOTE - "Japanese divided into 300 feudal territories,
Prints: Traditions in Costume" i ieah it a00local goernmorent
on so ttheMseu "ofAt each with a local government
through Feb. 18. The following headed by a daimvo or feudal lord.
article discusses the importance These, aided by their samurai or
of the printin Japanese life and warriors, kept the lower classes
its'use in costumes.I
under firm control, but were pre-
The Japanese wood-block print vented from becoming too powerful
or ukiyo-e originated during the themselves.
Edo period (1615-1867), a time of Ukiyo-e is not basically an aris-
peace and prosperity. The Toku- tocratic art, although the first ar-
gawa Clan, after a long period of tist whose name is associated with
civil war, had overthrown the wood-block tradition, Iwasa Mata-
Mikado (Emperor) in 1600 and bei, was a daimyo's son. Because
established itself at Edo (present- it was relatively inexpensive to
day Tokyo) from which it ruled produce, it was patronized pri-
the country for two and a half marily by the merchants of the
centuries. All foreign relations middle-class. Thus it describes
were severed and the country was their daily life, their entertain-

ment, and their festivals as well
as the more traditional subjects
of legend, history, and landscape.
Genre scenes portraying the lower
class were also frequently depicted.
However, ukiyo-e masters par-
ticularly delighted in designing
actors in popular roles and beauti-
ful women (usually geisha). The
latter were often used in parodies
of literature, drama, or aristocratic
life. Artists took care to represent
the dress of their subjects accu-
rately and elegantly, for the Ja-
panese appreciate both the beauty
of the garment itself and the sym-
colic significance of the motifs in
the textiles, many of which have
been adapted to contemporary
fashion. Thus these prints have
left a valuable record of the'
changing traditions in costumes.
The earliest prints, called sumi-
e, were taken from a single cherry-
wood block charged with black ink.
The simple, handsome black-and-
white designs which resulted were
used as book or album illustrations
and were sometimes issued singly.
Soon these were enlivened by color
added by hand, first red (tan-e),
then orange and green (beni-e).
[shikawa Toyonobu (1711-1785)
was the first to use blocks to add I
colors (primarily red and green)
to the basic black outlines; this
was called bene-suri-e. He also
experimented with superimposing
two colors to create new tones.
When fully developed polychrome
prints (nishiki-e) were first pro-
duced by Suzuki Harunobu around
1743 they were likened to silk bro-
cade because of their beautiful
colors. The dyes used for these
prints had vegetable or mineral
bases which have unfortunately
faded from their original strong,
but harmonious tones. The pat-
terns and colors of the prints re-
flect changes in weaving and dying
processes made to meet the in-
;reasing demand for more elabor-
ate and ostentatious design in tex-
tiles and costumes.

SATURDAY

& SUNDAY

LA NOTTE
(1960h)
by
MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI
the director of
".Red Desert" and "Blow-Up"
"The sweet life has gone sour!"
Starring: Jeanne Moreau, Monica Vitti,
and Marcello Mastroianni

ELIZABET
TAYLOR
MARLON
BRANDO
IN THE JOHN HUSTON-RAY STARK PRODUCTION
REFLECTIONS
IN A GOLDEN EYE
- ~-G~U~ILD

4*

7:00 & 9:05 P.M.

ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

NOW ONLY 75c

By MARK LAFER
PROGRAM
Symphony No. 6 in D major . Haydn
Pastorale d'ete ... ...... Honegger
Five pieces for Small
Orchestra (1962) . Wallace Berry
Concerto for Flute and .
Orchestra ........... .....Ibert
Symphonieaconcertante for
Violin and Viola ...Carl Stamitz
Danses concertantes ...Stravinsky
The Chicago Little Symphony,
its 21 members performing like a
fine-jeweled watch, presented a .
thoughtfully chosen and widely
varied selecton Of worasin a
well played,,, performance last
rlight in Rackham Aud.
And. it is the rare concert in-
:eed which is marked by so large
quantity of solo work as was
the one heard from 'this, youthful
group.
After reading through one of
the more interesting of the early
Eaydn symphonies, "Le Matin,"
and the quite relaxing Pastorale
Fete" of Honegger, Conductor
Thor Johnson's "little symphony"
approached the more formidable
"Five Pieces for Small Orches-
tra" by Wallace Berry.
Berry, a member..of the Univer-
sity music school faculty, wrote'
this work on commission for the
Little Symphony in 1962, but, I
believe, this was its first complete
performance in Ann Arbor. Being
unfamiliar with the work, I can
Jo little more than comment that
I found it quite listenable, and
definitely can not find fault with
the playing."
CORECTION
.Due to a typographical error"
one paragraph from :. a pge.
one story- by Urban Lehner in
yesterday's edition was inad-
vertently inserted into an ar-
ticle by Steve" Nissen.
The paragraph sread: "Re-
gents Alvin Bentley, Robert
Brown and Paul Goebel voted
with Matthaei and Cutlip in
favor of' the appeal. Regents
Robert Briggs, Gertrude lueb-
ner and Otis Smith voted
against."j
This paragraph referred to.
the 5-3 'vote approving a, court
challenge on IAv079' as r6-
ported by Lehner. The vote to
abolish curfew and let students
in university housing units
make their own visitation rules'
was 7-1 with Regent Paul Goe-
bel dissenting..
In addition Regent 'Otis'
Smith was identified as head of-
the General Motors Legal Divi-
sion. Actually he is. assistant
general counsel for GM.

The final three selections of the
rogram perhaps showed off the
%bility of the individual members
f the ensemble to a greater ex-
tent than the earlier ones. In the
[bert flute concerto, the flutist
nary Sigurdson, displayed a defi-
nite feeling for the music and ex-
3ellent technical ability. His per-
formance was marred only by his
pendency to make the same physi-
al motions regardless of the mu-
sic.
The Stamitz piece, written in an
earlier hey-day of the small or-
chestral group, and the Stravin-
Sky "Danses," written in a style
aot far removed from that ex-
amplified in the compositions of
the Mannheim school, showed the
iuallties ofthe reduced symphony
at-their-best.
The readings were crisp and
light; each part could be clearly
;icked out. In the Stamitz "Sym-
phonie concertante," it was re-
warding to hear the solo instru-
rnentalists, Alfio Pignotti, violin-
st, and Raymond Stilwell, violist,
without having to wade through
;he lushness of a 50-man string
section.
The evening concluded with an
encore, the "White Peacock," by
rhe American composer Charles
I'. Griffes.

'Mickey One' Passes 'Bonni

By ELLEN FRANK
One of the most rewarding
outcomes of the success of
"Bonnie and Clyde" is a reap-
prisal of the earlier works of its
director, Arthur Penn. "Mickey
One"-(a critical success at the'
1965 New York Film Festival,
but a commercial failure - is
thankfully joining in the reviv-
al at the Fifth Forum.
"From the Star, Producer and
Director of 'Bonnie and Clyde'"
should not be resented as an ad-
vertising lure. "Mickey One"

stands on its own, yet retains
notable features from Penn's
"Bonnie and Clyde" and "The
Left Handed Gun," a late 1950's
interpretation of the Billy the
Kid legend, starring Paul New-
man.
These three films, which Penn
himself has said are his best, all
deal with violence, particularly
the crime-pursuit-capture pat-
tern directed toward the indi-
vsdual whom Penn consistently
rfuses to call a "criminal". The
director's unique attitude to-
ward his heroes is capsilized by

i

te and Clyde'
a few remarks in "Mickey One"
-Mickey's gril friend asks him
if he really is guilty. He replies,
"What does that mean? Isn't
guilt simply the absence of in-
nocence?"
"Mickey One," well known in
Europe as the best of Anerican
films, is in many ways superior
to "Bonnie and Clyde". It is a
far richer film, employing every
possible device, including music
by Stan Getz atid the noises of
the city to stress Mickey's
strange guilt and flight.

THIS PRINT is from a collection entitled "Japanese Prints:
Traditions in Costume," now appearing at the Museum of Art.
"ARABS or ISRAELIS ?
A DILEMMA IN THE
AMERICAN LEFT"
A DEBATE SPONSORED BY THE
ORGANIZATION OF ARAB STUDENTS
DAVID GUTMANN LARRY HOCHMAN
Assoc. Prof. Psychology, U of M Assoc. Prof. Physics, E.M.U.
Moderator: KAMAL IBRACHI
UNION BALLROOM, 7:30 P.M., WEDNESDAY, JAN. 24

Vth Forum

210 S. F I FTH AVE.-761-9700
Between Washington and Liberty

NEW SHOW TIME POLICY:
CONVENIENT MATINEES Every Day-LATE SHOWS at 11:00 Every Fri. & Sot,
MON. thru THUR. Shows, 2:30, 7:00, 9:00. F RI., SAT. & SUN. continuous from 1:00
FRI. & SAT. 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00, 11 :00-SUN. 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00
HELD OVER BY UNPRECEDENTED POPULAR DEMAND
The Makers of "BONNIE AND CLYDE" present
WARREN BEATTY

* I

i

I

INP"Pmmmrmgwmqmma

DIAL
5-6290

,~4'!?~IT~TY' 3rd
1~~al~II~uJNWeek

"The Tension Is Terrific !"
-N.Y. TIMES
"Keeps You Glued To Your Seat !"
-MICHIGAN DAILY
AUDRE HIEPBURN

K

SUPERB! Stunningly put to-
gether and uncommonly well
played! Arthur Penn' has put
extraordinary scenes on film!
Warren Beatty's performance is
original and brilliant!"
-NEWSWEEK
"Arthur Penn has made an American
film that raised the N.Y. Film Festival
to rare heights, a brilliant screen work,
visually exciting and intellectually
satisfying.
Mickey One is told in stark, fast-mov-
ing nightmare terms that sparkle with
cinematic excitement and is marked

I

I

fi b
C 'f.Y 1
da k ti
a i+

1

r r

I

InMETROCOLOR
ISIRRYMOORE 'JAN MURA'SEANE LANGDON'PAUL MANTfE

SHOWS AT 1,3,5,7,9 P.M.

.4
-1
HI

4l
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Feature at 1:25-3:25-5:30-7:30-9:30

av} ?; :i4: 7;"i::"ii'r.'r}}': :: ".u.S::::ti{};:<ti k}?:t4}X4:

MONDAY
TUESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
7 :00-9 :00

3020 WASHTENAW Dial 434-1782

WEDNESDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
1 -3-5-7-9

DIAL Shows at 1,
8-6416 ( 'A!Iau kUS 13, 5,7, 9 P.M.
-sA'W FANP4SCO ctmt
"THE CRQWI) $URST fNTO APPLAUSE~ MORE ThAN !
25 TlAEs ff4 9& MUWTES& '
-$AN FR AjC1ScO H LM ESNAOT 6
"AS JOYPLIS AN0 ILLUMINATING A FILM AS IS CURRENTLY:
TO BE $EEN#"'4.L A TMES
"EXCITEMENT OF YOLLTTU SE ARCHING FOR
SLF~ EPESSIN"-wtY ME
'TI4AT EXTRAORDINARY SOCI0CILLURAL HAPPENINO
IN ALL ITS R AMBUNCTIOUJ$ SPGNT ANEITY."-v 'r nus

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ch film, and its rewards are
ally rich! MOVIE-MAKING AT
BEST! . N.HerodTribue
THE MOST EXCITING FILM OF
THE NEW YORK FILM FESTI-
VAL! Arthur Penn's most brilliant
movie ...his most daring! Warren
Beatty gives the best perfor-
mance of his career!"
-JOSEPH GELMiS.
Long Island Newsday
1/y+

99c Sale
CONTAC 10's
reg. $1:49
Now 99c.

He's a crook, an embezzler,
a con man, a forger..
I"1-M RSCH 1
CORPORATION
.. presents

1i

Columbia Pictures presents

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