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January 20, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-20

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. TAWTTARV 2E1_ 149*

sAG TOTE__CHGADAY __T lA T v.1 ___ n~

0,M UJ"A f j'NIAI'A A4U, lyb6J

5

cinema
Resnais' Codine: Another Clyde

Five Vail Students Make News
With Request for Equal Time

5-3 VOTE:
'U' To Appeal PA 379

(Continued from Page 1)

By MARGARET WARNER
It is hard to believe that Alain
Resnais, who produced such
momumental films as "Hiroshi-
man Mon Amour" and "Last Year
at Marienbad" also produced the
strange and senseless film "Co-
dine."
It is even harder to believe
that "Codine" should have re-
ceived the Grand Prize at the
Cannes film festival. Try to im-
agine the kind of a man (Codine)
who in one day steals trinkets
for his girlfriend, befriends a
threatened street urchin, and
calmly carries his mother outside
to leave her in the rain for the
night. Try to imagine the kind of
mother who would pour two
litres of boiling oil on her sleep-
ing son when he comes home to

turn over a new leaf. Admittedly
"Codine" takes place in a Ru-
manian slum in 1900 which
might excuse some eccentricities
of character. But the' story would
require some excellent writing and
filmmaking to pull it off.
Codine's character is remark-
ably like that of Clyde Barrow of
"Bonnie and Clyde." Both of
them mix undeniable warm-
heartedness toward their friends,
occasional glimmerings of social
consciousness and brutal tem-
pers.
And, like Clyde Barrow, Co-
dine managed to get rid of any
qualms about a life of force dur-
ing a long thoughtful prison stay.
Codine decides, "Injustice is
wrong - A bird in a cage is
wrong, you see." The narrator of

Eight 'U' Students Awarded
$950 In Hopwood Prizes

the film, a small boy, tries to
teach Codine that he should take
out his temper in harmless ways
so that he won't have to spend
his life in prison.
Codine succeeds for a while,
but when he kills his brother for
alleged attentions toward Co-
dine's girlfriend, Codine in effect
secures a violent death for him-
self.
On the whole, the filming of
Codine "is spotty and the lines
are even spottier. One of Res-
nais's few attempts at color,
"Codine" achieves a quality sim-
ilar to early color television. In
the blue-green mistiness of a,
Rumanian swamp the washed-
out color seems arty. Most of the
time it is just mediocre.
Striking shots are sparingly
springled into the. otherwise un-
inspired filmmaking. At one point
the face of a small boy is placed
in a careful composition of lines
and squares in a window. At an-
other point the camera pans from
below across the faces of Codine's
companions in a beerhall succeed-
ing well in giving an impression
of their drunken revelry.
But the merits of such accom-
plishment in composition are all
but erased by the far more fre-
quent sprinkling of inane lines.
Codine's brother hits a counter
with a stick. Codine, who is about
a foot and a half taller than his
brother, angrily gets up. His broth-
er says, "But I only struck the
counter." Codine says, "No, you
struck my heart." And, as you
might expect, Codine then stabs
his brother.
"Bonnie and Clyde" succeeds be-
cause Clyde maintains a believable
character. The character of Codine
fails because, in spite of moments
of pathos, it is not supported by
the consistent and subtle mastery
audiences have come to expect
of Resnais.

By DAVID SPURR
In their quest for equal time to
answer a question posed by Pres-
ident Johnson in Wednesday's
State of the Union Message, "Why,
then, all this restlessness?," stu-
dents at the Vail co-op have made
news all over the country.'
Thursday night, the group filmed
an interview with CBS television
at Vail, and recorded a radio pro-
gram with ABC that will be
broadcast over Ann Arbor's WPAG
Sunday afternoon. Since Wednes-
day, newspapers in Baltimore, To-
ledo, Chicago, and Florida, have
printed news stories on the group
based on Associated Press dis-
patches.
Five students at Vail sent tele-
grams to the Federal Communi-
cations Commission and news
services demanding equal time
after hearing the president's State
of the Union speech Wednesday
night. Thursday they asked legal
guidance from the office of Mich-
igan Congressman Marvin Esch.-
"Esch's office is in touch with
the FCC," said Harriet Rosen-
berg, Grad, one of the signers,
"to let us know what we can do."
The FCC is expected Monday to
send a copy of regulations govern-
ing their doctrine on fairness of
comment.
The FCC said Thursday it could
not consider the request on the ba-
sis of their policy for equal time,
because that policy only applies
to political candidates. The FCC
considers requests for fairness of
comment on the individual merits
of such cases.
"While we await a reply on our
legal options, we are concentrating
our efforts on trying to get net-
work or individual station time on
a voluntary basis," said Harriet
Friedmann, '69.
"We expected to be ignored at
first," said Miss Rosenberg, "but
now it appears conceivable that we
could be able to speak on some
program where the voices of dis-

sent can be heard." She added
that "for two days, we haven't
slept or eaten . . . we've been
talking it over, analyzing the pres-
ident'sspeech, and sending tele-
grams."
"We're dead serious," said an-
3ther signer, Randy Frost, '69. "We
feel the president didn't address
himself to the causes of restless-
ness in this country."
The president, after posing the
rhetorical question Wednesday
night, answered it by saying, "Be-
cause when a great ship cuts
through the sea, the waters are
always stirred and troubled."
Frost said his group is "seeking
the support of other concerned
people on campus in our cam-
paign to get the networks to

foreign policy and the effects of
this foreign policy on domestic,
urban priorities."
In New York, a spokesman for
ABC said Thursday he did not!
believe his network would honor
the request. The other two net-
works said they had not received
copies of the telegram and de-
clined to comment until they re-
ceive additional telegrams sent
by the students yesterday.

3 Vice-Presidents To Retirej

Eight University underclassmen
have received Hopwood Awards
for creative writing totaling $950.
These Hopwood Awards, and
the major awards to be made in
April, were made possible by the
late ,Avery Hopwood, a Univer-
sity alumnus of 1905. The author
left the University money to
recognize "the best creative
work" in writing by students.
Awards in essay, fiction, and
poetry were presented by Robert
F. Haugh, chairman of the Hop-
wood Committee.
Gail Diane Lenhoff, '70, re-
ceived awards in all three divis-
ions: in essay, $100 for a manu-
script entitled "History as Hal-
lucination"; in fiction, $100 for
"Some Things Green," and in
poetry, $150 for "In Dark Cor-
ners."
In essay the two other awards
were: $100 to George S. Chu,
'71, from Tokyo, Japan for "Fin-
ished, Kaput, Just Plain Dead,"
Dow Unswayed
By Protesters
-MIDLAND (A')- Its chief re-
cruiter says Dow Chemical Co.
has no intention of altering or
discontinuing its hiring campaign
on college campuses because of
student demonstrations against it
n recent months.
Dow is a manufacturer of na-
palm, a jellied gasoline used in
fire bonbing raids in Vietnam.
Ray Rolf, director of corpor-
ate recruiting, told the Midland
Daily News in an interview that
Dow will be seeking more than
1,000 new employees from this
year's college graduating classes.
Rolf said Dow recruiters will
be on 330 campuses and in con-
tact with students at 540 col-
leges and universities by next
June 1.

;rant time for opposing viewpoints Briggs, who authored the Re-
to be heard. Any telegrams they gents decision to challenge an-
wish to send to the networks sup- other public act in circuit court,,
porting our demand would be ap- said, "I'm as concerned with au-
preciated." tonomy as anyone. Thisisna
"We eelver stongy tat othtouchy issue; the lawyers are not
"We feel very strongly that both in agreement. I just think we've
major parties at this time are not carried our legal action fae
representing our concern-both in enough."
terms of implications of Americane -_

and $50 to Joan Oleck, '71, for
"The Gentle Protest for Peace."
In fiction there were two
awards besides Miss Lenhoff's:
$150 to Carol Ann Godfrey, '71,
for "We're the Sky"; and
$50 to Frank Crantz, '70, for
"Illusion in Reality."
In the poetry division there'
were awards besides Miss Len-
hoff's: $100 to Donald J. Kubit,
'70, for "A Child's Wisdom
Teeth"; $100 to James P. Peters,
'70, for "Bicycle Wanderings,"
and an award of $50 to Christine
S. Lahey, '70, for "Harvest."
Forty-six students entered a
total of 56 manuscripts - 11
essays, 13 fiction pieces and 32
poems.
The judges were Prof. Haugh
and Prof. Carlton F. Wells, both
of the English department.

(Continued from Page 1)
be coming to Ann Arbor," Ross
said. He plans to visit the Uni-
versity in two or three weeks "to
get acquainted."
He said that he has not worked
out a specific approach to his job
but regards relations with the Leg-
islature "an extremely important
relationship at any state univer-
sity."
Ross also plans to teach in the
economics department. "I think
it's important for an administra-
tor to keep that kind of contact
with the students," he said. "The
opporunity to teach was one of
the attractive features of the ap-
pointment. I love teaching."
Stirton has been a vice-presi-
dent since 1956, and director of
the Dearborn Campus since 1958.
He submitted his request for re-
tirement, effective June 30, in
keeping with his long-planned in-
tention to step down after he be-
comes 65. He will be 65 March 20.
"I have planned to retire at 65

since World War II," Stirton said
yesterday. "All this nonsense about
By-law changes makes it look like
Fleming tried to fire me." He in-
dicated that he plans to visit for-
eign countries and "manage my
flower garden.''
Niehuss has handled the Uni-
versity's relations with the legisla-
ture for 25 years. Unlike Stirton
he will not leave the University
upon retiring from his present
post. "We hope to continue to ben-
efit from his advice and counsel as
a member of the University com-
munity and a colleague," Flem-
ing said.

Touchy Issue
Mrs. Huebner said, "I think we
will lose the suit in the Supreme
Court and that loss will jeopar-
dize our cases against other state
laws, which are much more im-
portant."
The University is currently
challenging Public Act 124, a law
requiring the office of the state
architect to approve all construc-
tion plans for state-financed
university buildings, and Public
Act 240, which limits the ratio of
out-of-state enrollments at state
universities to 25 per cent of the
student body.
Moot Question
Smith, a former state Supreme
Court justice and presently head
of General Motors' Legal Division
called the question "moot" but
declined to explain.
In deciding to appeal, the Re-
gents quoted Judge Ager from the
circuit court decision: "It is (the
Regents') desire to proceed only
in a legal manner and they have
every right to have a determina-
tion by the court on this very
important legal question."
Although decisions from circuit
court are normally appealed to

the Michigan Court of Appeals,
the Regents will petition that
court to certify the case to the
Supreme Court for decision with-
out a hearing in the appeals
court.
.'URegents
End Hours'
For Women
(Continued from Page 1)
'Theresolution included provi-
sions for the "Board of Governors
and the University administration
to take all necessary steps to in-
sure a complete review of the ex-
perimental policies, as well as of
the decision-making process, at
the close of the present term."
Fleming indicated that the re-
organization of the OSA would
Stake place after the Presidential
Commission on the Student Role
'in Decision Making completes its
report.
Involved are such questions as
what administrative units are
properly responsible to the OSA,
whether the office should perform
a disciplinary role, the level of
responsibility and title of the of-
fice, and what its relationship
should be to the academic units,
to a revised student government,
and to student judiciaries.
._ M

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NOW SHOWING
Feature Times:
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:00-9:00

TON IGH'

ieave the childrmenhome.

T AT
ID
1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

=il

HERB DAVI
(classical guitarist)

ELI ZAETH
TAYLOR
MARLON
IN THE JOHN HUSTON-RAYSTARKPRODUCTION
REFLECTIONS
IN AGOLDEN EYE
Join The Daily Today!

doing guitar and lute instrumentals
$1.00 cover includes entertainment and refreshments!

"FESTIVAL!"JOAN BAEZ- BOB DYLAN-" PETER, PAUL & MARY*DONOVAN
JUDY COLLINS- MIKE BLOOMFIELD PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND -SON HOUSE-THEODORE BIKEL- ODETT-MIMI & DICK FARINA
MISSISSIPPI JOHN HURT - JIM KWESKIN JUG BAND HOWLIN' WOLF - PETE SEEGER - BUFFY SAINTE-MARIE - SPIDER JOHN KOERNE

! T-_ _ ._

'' 1

NO 2-6264

DIAL
8-6416

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Continuous Today
from 1 P.M.

Vth Forum

210 S. F IFTH AVE.-761-9700
Between Washington and Liberty

NEW SHOW TIME POLICY:
CONVENIENT MATINEES Every Day-LATE SHOWS at 11:00 Every Fri. & Sat.
MON. thru THUR. Shows, 2:30, 7:00, 9:00. F RI., SAT. & SUN. continuous from 1:00
FRI. & SAT. 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00, 11 :00-SUN. 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00

Creative Arts Festival
Presents
MIRIAM MAKEBA
in concert
SATURDAY, JAN. 27
8:30-Hill Aud.
$2.50, $3.00, $3.50
Block ticket sales due 10 A.M. Jan. 20
at the UAC office

HELD OVER BY UNPRECEDENTED POPULAR DEMAND
The Makers of "BONNIE AND CLYDE" present
WARREN BEATTY

InMETROCOLOR
IFRYMOEJANMUAYSEANE [ANBOON PALMANTE

I

K
K
K
H*-

S U P E RB! Stunningly put to-
gether and uncommonly well
played! Arthur Penn has put
extraordinary scenes on film!
Warren Beatty's performance is
original and brilliant!"
-NEWSWEEK
'Arthur Penn has made an American
film that raised the N.Y. Film Festival
to rare heights,a brilliant screen work,
visually exciting and intellectually
satisfying.
"'Mickey One' is told in stark,fast-mov-
ing nightmare terms that sparkle with
cinematic excitement and is marked
by total artistry.
"A rich film, and its rewards are
equally rich! MOVIE-MAKING AT
ITS BEST!" -.'eae

-4

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:
.

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I

44

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xt:
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cTHE MOST EXCITING FILM OF
THE NEW YORK FILM FESTI-
VAL! Arthur Penn's most brilliant
movie...his most daring! Warren
Beatty gives the best perfor-
mance of his career!"
-JOSEPH GELMIS.
Long Island Newsday
x

-a

H4

The third film by the producer-director-editor team who made LAST YEA
AT MARIENBAD and HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR. Directed by Her
t-fdt-,;

AAt

P r.l mMSa t lirte ra "frttcAnlQ

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