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January 20, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-20

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SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

LB J
T o K
Senate OK

Appoints
secretary

Clark

Clifford

of

Defense

Post

'

Expected in
Near Future
A Presidential Adviser
Fills Cabinet Seat
Held by McNamara
WASHINGTON () -President
Johnson yesterday chose Washing-
ton attorney Clark Clifford to be
the new Secretary of Defense.
Clifford is a long time consul-
tant to a string of Presidents from
Harry S. Truman on and has been
a key adviser to Johnson on di-
plomatic, intelligence and defense
problems.
He will move into the vacancy
created by the resignation of Rob-
ert S. McNamara-the man who
has seven years in the post behind
him-the longest span of any
Secretary of Defense.
Johnson told reporters that he
and McNamara agreed yesterday
4 that he would leave the defense
post not later than March 1.
Praise
The President had high words of
praise both for the departing -sec-
retary and the man who will suc-
ceed him.
Clifford, who is 61, was rec-
ommended to him, the President
said, by McNamara, and Secretary
of State Dean Rusk.
The appointment has been un-
der consideration for months, the
President said, but was made final
Friday.
Submitted Soon
4 Clifford's nomination for the de-
fense post will be submitted to the
Senate at a very early date, John-
son said, so he will be able to step
into the Pentagon post when Mc-
Namara leaves.
As to what factors went into
the choice of Clifford Johnson
) told a newsman:
"He has been a very wise and
prudent counselor to many Presi-
dents, and certainly to me, in
matters of defense and matters of
diplomacy."
Clifford's Work
The President said Friday Clif-
ford had worked closely with the
State Department and that Rusk
considered him one of the finest
choices for government service.
Clifforfd has served under John-
son as chairman of the Foreign
Intelligence Advisory Board and
of the Foreign Relations Advisory
Board.
"He has been a counselor,"
Johnson said, "on most of the
important decisions made in the
international fields, from defense
strength, to weapons, to actions
and I think he is universally re-
garded by those whom I talked
with as a man the government
ought to get if I could."
No Set Term
Clifford is coming to the Pen-
tagon post with no understanding
by himself or the President on
how long a term he might serve,
Johnson said.
Clifford was born in Kansas, but
his family moved to St. Louis, Mo.,
soon afterwards and Clifford be-
gan practicing law there.
One of the first in Washington
to comment on the Clifford ap-
pointment was Sen. J. W. Ful-
bright, chairman of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee. He
said Clifford was a personal friend
and "certainly has great qualifi-
cations to make a good secretary."
"The chairman, who had many
differences with McNamara over
foreign policy, said the appoint-
ment "comes as a really great sur-
prise."
McNamara Praised
Johnson had glowing words, too,
"Mr. McNamara," he said, "has
had a truly outstanding record of
government service."'

He said it was with the greatest
regret he was losing McNamara
but he was pleased that Washing-
ton isn't losing him and he won't
te far away.".

PROMISE FOR PROTESTS:
Demonstrators Depart;
Aircraft Carrier Docks

-Associated Press-
New Secretary of Defense Clifford
GUATEMALAN CHARGES:
Castro Group Blamed
For Killing U.S. Aides

SASEBO, Japan (') - Sailors
from the nuclear powered U.S.
aircraft carrier Enterprise came
ashore yesterday for the first time
In Japan after most of the student
demonstrators against the ship's
visit had left town.
Capt. Kent L. Lee, commander
of the Enterprise, was asked at a
news conference if his crew had
been given any instructions in the
light of the Intrepid deserters, who
opposed the Vietnamese war.
Loyalty
"We merely pointed out we ex-
pect them to be loyal United States
citizens and support the com-
rmanding officer of the Enterprise,"
he replied. "To get enticed into
something like defecting is not
what we would expect of our crew."
Because of the violence, some of
it only a few hours.earlier, the first
325 sailors ashore from the 75,000
ton carrier were kept insidethe
U.S. Navy base for two hours.
Then the restriction was lifted
and the sailor relaxed in what is
described- as "the best liberty port
in Japan."
They were followed by some
3,000 more sailors from the carrier
and its escorting frigates, the nu-
clear powered Truxtun and the
conventionally powered Halsey.
The leftists contend the Enter-
prise's stopover on her way to
Vietnam involves Japan in the
Vietnam war and runs contrary to
the nation's policy of renouncing
nuclear weapons.
Visit's Purpose
Although the Enterprise left
Pearl Harbor only 10 days ago, the
Defense Department in Washing-
ton said the ship's call at Sasebo
was intended only to provide leave

for the crews and a chance to
pick up supplies.
U.S. officials said agreement
was reached last November to send
the Enterprise into Sasebo to bring
the Japanese public face to face
with the reality of U.S. nuclear
surface vessels, just as they became
aware of nuclear submarines after
the call of the Sea Dragon three
years ago.
Student's Leave
As the radical leftist student de-
monstrators left town earlier, they
vowed to return in strength Sun-
day for another violent protest
against the first visit to Japan
of a nuclear powered surface ship.
About 400 rock throwing stu-
dents tried to push past the police
barricades outside the base's main
entrance yesterday morning as the

big carrier was anchoring offshore,
out of their sight.
About 800 charged the police
Wednesday and about 700 Thurs-
day. In each case the police, mak-
ing their stand at a bridge leading
to the base's main gate, repelled
the students with tear gas, clubs
and blasts from water cannons.
After the clash yesterday, about
200 students snake danced to a
housing compound for U.S. Navy
families but left after about 10
minutes of throwing rocks at Ja-
panese police who set up barbed
wire barricades.
Police said 10 policemen, four
students and two Japanese report-
ers were injured yesterday, all at
the bridge, and eight persons were
arrested.

Eartha Kitt

EartIha Kitt Shocks

LBJ To Ask Personal Tax
Surcharge Effective April 1

GUATEMALA (P) - Did the
shadow of Fidel Castra lurk be-
hind the machine gun slaying this
week of the chief of the U.S. mili-
tary mission here and a naval
attache?
Guatemala's police chief, Col.
Manuel Sosa Avila, himself the
target of an unsuccessful assassi-
nation attempt during the current
terror wave, says yes.
He claims the plot was hatched
at last year's meeting of the left-
ist Iatin American Solidarity
Organization, OLAS conference,
hosted by Prime Minister Castro
in Havana.
A communique signed by the
Rebel Armed Forces, FAR, said
that organization killed the two
Americans because the U.S. mili-
tary mission was helping Guate-
mala in pursuing guerrillas.
One informed source suggested
FAR may have slain the Ameri-
cans "to get into the lime light
again and put pressure on Castro
to extend more help."
Another theory advanced was
that FAR and other Communist
elements wanted a common cause
to heal damaging factional splits.
Yet the Communist type terror-
ist slayings ocurred as Cesar Mon-
tes, chief of the Rebel Armed For-
ces-FAR-was reported veering
from Castro's "export revolution"
line to Moscow's softer "talk poli-
tics" policy.
Further links between FAR and
the slayings occurred the follow-
ing day. Leonardo Castillo John-
son, 30, son of a well known Com-
munist now dead, was shot by
guards during an attempt to as-
sassinate the police chief. The
government described Castillo as a
key FAR figure. A recent FAR
communique said the same.
Havana Radio reported after
last year's conference that the
GuatemalannOLAS delegation, in-
cluding Montes, went from Hava-
na to Moscow for Orientation.
A U.S. government spokesman
said, "The tremendous reaction
that followed the killing of the
Americans attests to the fact that
the Guatemalan people were
shocked and sad."
The military mission has been
here since 1956, invited by the
Guatemalan government.
The functions of the 34 member
mission are to extend advisory,
training and supply help to the
Guatemalan Defense Department.
"There is nothing unusual about

the operation," said an embassy
spokesman. "There are similar
missions in various Latin Ameri-
can countries."
President Julio Cesar Mendez
Montenegro has imposed drastic
measures to cope with the terror-
ist campaign.
The U.S. government is helping
Guatemala with about $2 million
annually in aid plus $25 million
in loans of various forms.

World News Roundup*

WASHINGTON ({P)-The John-
son administration appears to be
shooting for an April 1 effective
date for its proposed 10 per cent
income tax surcharge on individ-
uals, but a retroactive Jan. 1 date
for corporations.
This possible schedule emerged,
yesterday in the wake of the new.
budget figures-spending of $186
billion and an $8 billion deficit-
contingent on the tax boost-for
the next fiscal year.
The figures were revealed by
President Johnson in his State of
the Union message.
Administration officials declined
to say what effective dates they
would seek in appealing anew
for adoption of the surcharge. The
April-January combination re-
portedly is the most likely possi-
bility.
Disclosure Monday
The dates are expected to be dis-
closed officially Monday when the
House Ways and Means Commit-
tee reopens public hearings on the
surcharge bill. But in any case,
the, committee chairman, Rep.
Wilbur D. Mills (D-Ark), says he
wants a close look at the budget
before he decides whether to sup-
port a tax increase.
Government witnesses will base
their appeal for higher taxes on
defense of the dollar abroad and
dampening inflation at home.
One key source said foreign
countries consider the tax bill "the

psychological symbol of fiscal re-
sponsibility."
In planning the new budget, the
administration is figuring on $3
billion in revenues from the tax
package during the current fiscal
year which ends June 30 and $12.9
billion during the next fiscal year.
This refinement of the figures
the President outlined includes not
only revenues from the surcharge
but also from a speedup of cor-
porate tax collections and the
postponement of excise tax cuts
scheduled to go into effect April 1.
Expiring Taxes
Two excise taxes are scheduled
to decline on April 1-the 7 per
cent manufactures exise tax on
automobiles to 2 per cent and the
10 per cent excise tax on telephone
service to 1 per cent.
The auto tax would drop to 1
per cent next Jan. 1 while the
telephone tax would be eliminated.
But under the President's pro-
gram ,the auto excise would re-
main at 7 per cent until July 1,
1969 and the dorp to 1 per cent
would be postponed until Jan. 1,
1970.
The final word on any new ef-
fective date most come from Con-
gress where there is still key op-
position to a tax hike. Much of the
opposition is in the House and
Senate Democratic Leader Mike
Mansfield said prospects of Sen-
ate passage are good if it clears
the House.

-Associated Press

Lady Bird'
WASHINGTON (P) - Singer+
Eartha Kitt, in an emotional
White House confrontation with
Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson, said U.S.
youth are rebelling because of the
Vietnam war.
Young men don't want to be'
sent off "to get shot" in a var
they don't understand, Miss Kitt
told the First Lady at a Thursday
luncheon.
"So they rebel in the streets and
take pot, she added, explaining to
Mrs. Johnson, "In case you don't
know the expression, that's mari-
juanna."
At times Miss Kitt faced Mrs.
Johnson directly across the dinner
table and the scene was electric.
Mrs. Johnson sat through-it all,
appearing disturbed but maintain-
ing outward control. Finally she
rose to regain command of her
emotionally shattered luncheon.
She told the Negro singer: "I
have not lived the background you
have. I cannot speak as passion-
ately or as well, but we must keep
our eyes, our hearts and our ener-
gies fixed on constructive aims to
do something that will make this
a happier, better educated land."
.The President said it might cut
down juvenile delinquency if all
parents asked themselves at mid-
night where their children were.
As the President prepared to

depart, Miss Kitt stepped in his
parth and asked, "What do we do
about delinquent parents who
have to go to work and can't
spend time with their children?
What do you do with the chil-
dren?"
Pausing, Johnson told her quiet-
ly the 1967 Social Security Act
provided millions of dollars for day
care centers. He said he recognizes
the problem and left the women
with thesuggestion that they "tell
me what you think."-
Miss Kitt was not among three
scheduled speakers at the lunch-
eon. $ut when the First Lady call-
ed for discussion the singer rose
and made an impassioned plea on
behalf of American youth and
their parents, who, sh', said,
couldn't come to talk to the Presi-
dent and his wife.
She said she didn't intend to
offend Mrs. Johnson or the other
women, but: "I am here to say
what is in my heart."
Youngsters are angry, said Miss
Kitt, "because their parents are
angry, and their parents are angry
because they're so highly taxed
and because there is a war going
on and we do not understand
why."
"No mother wants to work to
educate her child only to have him
snatched away and sent off to
Vietnam,* she said.

0

s

Parley

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Defense

of-

ficials predicted yesterday the
United States will draft 72,000
more men this year than in 1967.
This increase to an expected
302,000 total reflects the large
numbers of men who were drafted
during the Southeast Asia buildup
of 1966 and will be leaving service
this year.
About 230,000 men, or an aver-
age of about 19,100 a month, were
called to duty last year. This year's
average will reach around 25,100,
although the March draft call al-
ready has been set at 39,000:
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -
The United States has, assured
Cambodia there is no foundation
for suggestions that U.S. forces
plan to make short incursions into
Cambodian territory to seek out
Communist forces.
Australian Ambassador Sinclair
Deschamps called on Premier Son
Sann Thursday to give him Wash-
ington's assurance that the U.S.
position has not changed since
last week's meetings between Am-
bassador Chester Bowles and Cam-
bodian officials.
A communique published after
the Bowles meetings said the Unit-
ed States would do every thing
possible not to violate Cambodian
territory.
William P. Bundy, assistant sec-
retary of state, declared Jan. 12:
"When you have situation where
Viet Cong and North Vietnamese
trooops are in Cambodia, there

may arise a situation where Amer-
ican forces are faced with the
necessity of taking action in what
is called the right of defending
themselves."
* * *
DETROIT - The United Auto
Workers Union, striking three
General Motors Corp. foundries,
said Friday the giant automaker
could be shut down nationally in
a week or 10 days for opposing the
union's demand for six minutes of
washup time in foundries.
Leonard Woodcock, UAW vice
president and the GM union's De-
partment director, told news men
that 17,000 workers have been
idled because of foundry strikes
and resulting parts shortages.
LONDON-Gloom and resent-
ment hung over Prime Minister
Harold Wilson's Labor party today
following a division in party ranks
in the House of Commons Thurs-
day night.
Wilson's government won a cru-
cial vote of confidence 304.9 when
the opposition Conservatives ab-
stained en masse, but 25 Laborites
rebelled against the government
and also abstained from voting
on the motion approving Wilson's
cuts in social welfare spending.
Political observers believed it
improbable that the party high
command would risk the lasting
uproar that would result from ex-
pulsion of the rebels.
It seemed more likely they would
be reprimanded and the loyalists'
anger left to cool off with time.

Eu
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CLIP OUT THIS SCHEDULE AND SAVE!

ADULTS ONLY'
YOU MUST BE OVER 18 FOR OUR
AFTER HOURS
Every Friday and Saturday Nite
1 :30 to 4:00 a.m.
featuring
THlE PRIME MOVERS
AND OTHER GROUPS
Cover only $1.00
the FIFTH DIMENSION
216 W. Huron Phone 761-7866

RUSSI1AN
FILM
FESTIVAL1
Jan. 24 thru Feb. 6
(2 WEEKS ONLY)
Among the 14 famous films scheduled are
Esenstein's monumental POTEMKIN and ALEX-
ANDER NEVSKY (music by Prokofieff); Donskoi's
CHILDHOOD OF MAXIM GORKY (one of the 10
best films of all time) and his new biography
of Lenin, SONS AND MOTHERS (Detroit pre-.
miere); the great Dovzhenko's SHORS (not
seen here in 15 years); the original version
of DON QUIXOTE in color; PLISETSKAYA
DANCES, a magnificent documentary with
the Bolshoi Ballet and the ballerina
often called the greatest dancer alive;
and CHAPAYEV, possibly the most
popular Russian film ever made...r

I

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PHANTAZMAGORIK!
The
Times Square Two
"Worth checking out .. ."-A.A.P. LIBRARY

I

SATURDAY & SUNDAY
LA NOTTE
(1960)
by
MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI

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presents
Thor Johnson
and the
Chicago Little Symphony
SAT., JAN. 20, 8:30
IN RACKHAM AUDITORIUM

Wed & Thurs POTEMKIN (1925) Sergei Eisenstein -
Jan 24&25 at 7:15 & 10:15
ALEXANDER NEVSKY (1938) (music by Prokofieff)
Sergei Esenstein - at 8:25 only
Fri & Sat LADY WITH THE DOG (1960) Joseph Heifitz - U
Jan 26 & 27 at 7:00 & 10:00
BALLAD OF A SOLDIER (1959) Grigory Chukhrai
- at 8:30 only
Sunday SHADOWS OF OUR FORGOTTEN ANCESTORS U
Jan 28 (Color) (1964) Sergei Paradjhanov -
at 2:45, 5:30 & 8:25
PLISETSKAYA DANCES (1965) Vassili Katanyan
- at 4:15, 7:10 & 9:55
Mon & Tues THE CHILDHOOD OF MAXIM GORKY (1938)
Jan 29 & 30 Mark Donskoi - at 7:45 & 10:10
PUDOVKIN (a documentary about the great Russian
director with excerpts from his films MOTHER, STORM U
OVER ASIA and THE END OF ST. PETERSBURG) (1960)
Andrei Kustov - at 7:00 & 9:30
, Wed & Thurs SHORS (1939) Alexander Dovzhenko - at 8:35 only
Jan 31,Febl1
CHAPAYEV (1934) Sergei & Georgy Vassiliev -
at 7:00 & 10:35
Fri & Sat DON QUIXOTE-(in Color) (1959) Grigory Kozintsev
* Feb 2& 3 -at 8:35 only
THE -CRANES ARE FLYING (1958) Mikhail Kala. U
tozov - at 7:00 & 10:30
r. efhe AE n. I U-nC . . .. .. .s , --

.

I

Program:

Symphony No. 6 in D major ("Le Motin") ..... Haydn
Pastorale d'ete ....................... Honegger
Fies P:~ra . r',nl rractr 19A9)Wnllnro R.rr

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