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December 16, 1898 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1898-12-16

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VOL. IX, No. 69.
WI4Li

ANN ARBOR, MICH., FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1898.

THREE CENTS.

T
H
E
T
A
L
0
R

T
FINE WINTFR SUITINGS. H
* E

WE CARRY THE LARGESTi
STOCK
IN THE CITY.
108 E. WASHINGTON ST.

I
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++++++++++++++++++++++++I
Violin,
St Guitar,
S ul 'l Banjo,
Mandolin.
We hae a complete assortment and a
good qutity. Prices right.
WILDER'S PHARMACY
:336 South State Street.
00611 Dapuad NIUI.
During the rest of the college year we
wittserve lunches at all hours, day or
night.atu ine of Pipes, Cigars, and
Tobaeeo.
R. E. JOLLY & CO.,
308 So. State Street.
Christmas
Candies FOR HER.
Leave your card and her address
withus and we will pack securely
and express. Shtpaments msay he
made trm So-ton or Chicnao to
save exprerss. No eaten charge tar
paehing or shippiag. Deliceryi t
the city free.
Galkins' PharIau
REMEMBER
YOUR FRIENDS.
With a U. of M. Sou-
venir Calendar for 1899,
Designed by Miss Lovell.
The neatest and most
artistic Calendar of the
season. PIICE 50c.
Some Choice Books
and fancy booklets now
ready for your inspection
at our two stores.
WAHR'S
ANN ARBOR
Up town Dawn Town
State St. Opp.,Court Hose
rlain St.

EUROPEAN FELLOWSHIP.
Has Been Established by the Asso-
ciation of Collegiate Alumnn.
The Association of Collegiate Alum-
nm is desirous of encouraging the
pursuit of advance courses of study
among women graduates of colleges.
It therefore proposes to devote $500
every year towards paying the ex-
penses of some young woman who
wishes to carry on her studies in a
foreign country. Applications for
this fellowship will be received by
any member of the committee having
it in charge. The candidates must
be graduates of colleges belonging to
the association, and applications for
the year 1899-1900 must be handed
in before Feb. 1. 1899. A competi.
tive exaination will not be held,
but the bestowal of the fellowship
will be based upon evidence of the
candidate's ability, and her prospect
of success in hr chosen line of study.
The fellowship will not usually be
granted to those who are intending to
take up the practice of any of the
three learnsd professions, though
such are not formally excluded from
the competition; it will rather be be-
stowed upon those who are looking
forward to positions as professors and
teachers and to literary and scientific
vocations. Preference will be given,
other things being equal, to gradu
ates of not more tnan five years'
standing. The fellowship will, it
general, he held for one year; but ia
an unusually promising case, the
term may be extended at the discre-
tion of the committee. Applications
may be made to any of the follow-
ing: Mrs. Bessie Bradwell Helmer,
1428 Michigan ave., Ciicago, Ill.;
Mrs. Helen Hiscock Backus, 57 Liv-
ingston st., Brooklyn, N. Y.; Mrs.
Christine Ladd Franklin, 1507 Park
ave., Baltimore, Md.
Ma Go to Pennss.
Work on track athlectics is to be
begun immediately after the holi-
days. There has been some talk of
sending the team to Pennsylvania's
meet in the spring and to the Eastern
intercollegiate meet at Mott Haven
in June. The Pennsylvania trip is
opposed in some quarters, as the early
traisning is not considered favorable
to a good season's work. Several of
the individual track men will go to
Mott Haven, and it is possible that a
considerable number will go, but
financial considerations will have an
influence. The team lost money last
year on its trip to Pennsylvania.
Medical Society.
There will be a meeting of the four
classes of the Medical Department
Saturday morning at the Medical
building to further consider plans
for the organization of a big medical
society. A constitution has been
drawn up and will be considered in
detail at the meeting. There seems
to be a strong sentiment in the
Medical Department that such a so-
ciety is needed and the prospeuts are
good that the steps taken last Satur-
day morning will result in the organ-
ization of a permanent society to-
morrow morning.

Webster Society.
The Webster Society will meet to-
night at 8 o'clock in Webster Hall.1
The following is the program: Music;
reading, Mr. Geake; speech, "Our
Indian Schools," Mr. Howell; music,1
vocal solo, Mr. Dodge; debate, le-
solved, "That the Senate shoulda
ratify the treaty of peace arranged
between the Spanish and American
Commissioners;" affirmative, J. O.
Miller, H. I. Weinstein; negative, D.
T. Jones and C. Wisner. Prof.
Knowlton will talk on "Judge
Cooley in Public Life."' There will
also be a business meeting and elec-
tion of officers after the program.
Jeffersonian Society. -
The following is the program an-
nounced for the Jeffersonian Society
tonight: Current topics, Mr. Russel;t
reading, Mr. Wilson; declamation:,
Mr. Crowley; essay, "Longfellow's
Shorter Poems," Mr. Lund; oration,c
Mr. Thomas; speech, Mr. Barbee;
biography, Mr. Donaldson; debate,
Resolved, "That there should be a
Municipal Ownership and Control of
Street Railways;" affirmative, Messrs.
Heck and Keneipp; negative, Messrs.
Todd and Jackson.
Alpha Nu Society.
The Alpha Nu Society will meet
tonight in Alpha Nu hall at 8 o'clock.'
The following is the program: Music;1
paper, V. D. Wlls; improptu, R.
H. Kitely; debate, "Resolved, That
independent actioss is preferable to'
party action in politics;" affirmative,
W. L. Wells and R. D. Hollister,'
negative, G. F. Paul and J. C. Bills.
A general discussion and business'
meeting will follow the program.
Adelphi Societ.
The Adelphi Society will meet
Saturday night Dec. 17, at 8 o'clock.
The following program will be given:
Music, Y. M. C. A. quartet; oration,
"The Dying Year," C. D. Hurrey;
"Co-education Coasting," J. A.
Evans; "Honesty the Best Policy,"
Mr. Veasy; "Happy New Year,"
Mr. Dewey. Hat speeches. After
the regular program a business
meeting will be held.
The Philosophical Society.
The next students' meeting of the
Philosophical Society will occur Fri-
day evening, at 8 o'clock. Room
21. A paper: "The Relation of
Philosophy to Social Forces and
Condition by Mr. John E. Lautner
will be read and discussed. All stu-
dents are invited to attend this
meeting.
The Delta Upsilon fraternity will
give a house party tomorrow night.
Prof. McMurrich published re-
cently, in the Jornal of Anatooy
and Physiology, London, under the
title, "A Case of Crossed Dystopice
of the Kidney," an interesting paper
on this peculiar malformation.
David F. Dillon, '99 L., who was
on the debating team last year, will
return the last part of this semester
in time to take the examinations.
He expects to pass them, take the
second semester work and graduate
with his class next June.

ALL-AMERICAN ELEVEN.
Harvard Expert Names Best Teams
East and West.
One of the greatest experts en foot-
ball that Harvard has produced, in
the estimation of many critics and an
able gridiron official, was induced to
give his impressions on an all-Ameri-
can eleven. The choice of the Har-
vard man is presented because of its
apparent fairness and chiefly because
the West's twvo greatest kickers.
O'Dea and and Herseliberger, are
named, and Widman, of Michigan,
and Slaker, of the University of
Chicago, are mentioned as backs.
Burnett gets honors for guard over
Boal, of Harvard, and Capt. Bennett.
of Michigan, is given the end position
over Poe, of Princeton. The selec-
tion is:
First Eleven. Second Eleven.
Overeid........ . iray. .. ..
Hare.........L. . tBron(al)..L. .
Chamberlain.......L, T. Hillebrand........ L. T.
Bennett ..... LEPoo..... ...L.
Burnett......O. Boai . N........R.G
Hnghton. It.... 'i' . oodmean....t. . T.
Coehean.e. N.E.Paierc .. ..
Daly ........ ( B. E y....... . B.
nirroherger..aL. I. B. wedcan. ...
Dihlee... . i. . .B.are...... . .
Slaker.............F. B. O'Dea...........F. B.
Stearns' Collection Here.
The Frederick Stearns' collection
of Musical Instruments reached Ann
Arbor at 8 o'clock yesterday morn-
ing and they were put in the room
that has been set aside for their ex-
hibition, but nothing will be done
toward unpacking thems until the
cases in which they are to be put
arrive. An idea of the size of the
collection may be had from the fact
that there were 38 large cases, mak.
ilg six loads for the "U. Of M."
drays.
Law Building Dedication.
The date of the dedication of the
new law building has been set ahead
to Feb. 10, on account of the un-
certainty of the date when University
Hall will be again ready for use.
The program will iclude an address
in the afternoon by some speaker of
national prominence, and a reception
in the new building in the evening.
President McKinley, and ex-Presi-
dent Harrison and Senator Vilas
have been mentioned as possible
speakers for the occasion.
Whist Club Meet.
The Ypsilanti Whist Club has in-
vited the Detroit, Jackson and Uni-
versity of Michigan clubs to attend
a meeting at Ypsilanti tomorrow
evening. The club from here will
attend in a body and the other two
clubs will send teams. If this first
meeting is a success steps will be
taken toward establishing a league
consisting of the whist clubs of
Southern Michigan.
Lamn Department Closes Wednes-
da.
The Law Department has adopted
the plan again this year which has
been followed for several years back
of finishing work a day before the
other departments close for the
Christmas vacation. To do this the
work of Thursday will be done to-
morrow all of the classes having their
regular Thursday recitations at the
usual hours.

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