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September 24, 1993 - Image 86

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Bee Koh Travel

CRUISE &TRAVEL

EXPO 9

' 1

TUES., SEPT. 28TH CIVIC CENTER SOUTHFIELD 7-9 PM

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NORWEGIAN'

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(O

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86

Hours:

ligious diversity. Under all
the faces are the words, "Do
unto others as you would have
them do unto you."
We saw, too, the hand-woven
pure silk rug, gift from
Ghana; and the mural
tapestry from Belgium titled
Triumph of Peace, one of the
largest tapestries ever woven.
One flight up, we entered
the huge, dome-shaped room
where all 181 members of the
General Assembly convene.
"The resolutions passed here
are not legally binding but
they do reflect public world
opinion," explained Ms.
Hanson. "And it's the only
forum in the world where so
many countries do send
representatives to discuss
issues they feel are urgent."
It was a fitting thought for
the end of our guided tour.
But it wasn't the end of our
United Nations visit. Next
day, after we enjoyed a walk
on the plaza, where we
admired the sculpture and
the views of the river, we re-
entered the United Nations
headquarters.
First we headed downstairs
to the gift shop on the lower
level. Here Hanna Shoukry
from Alexandria, Egypt,
who's worked in the shop for
20 years, showed us sterling
silver Stars of David and told
us about the Israeli-made
crafts.
Next we stopped at the
United Nations Post Office,
unique because the United
Nations has its own postal
administration, complete

with specially designed
stamps and stationery.
Upstairs on the lobby level,
we stopped to look at several
of the special exhibits. One in
particular, "No War Any-
more," was a vivid rendering
of the effects of war on
children, complete with
paintings about peace by
youngsters.
Nearby was another exhibit
focusing on the 32 organiza-
tions that work for economic
and social programs around
the world. We looked at other
exhibits detailing U.N. efforts
to promote peace and human
rights. We saw paintings and
sculptures, too, all with the
theme of peace.
This theme was on our
minds as we were leaving the
building. "With all these
organizations and all this
effort," said my mother, "why
can't they stop the fighting in
Bosnia?"
There's no easy answer. A
visit to the United Nations is
inevitably a reminder of the
gap between the ideal of
peace and the reality of war
and conflict.
But it's also an inspiring
site. With its detailed
exhibits, with the priceless
gifts from many nations, the
paintings and sculpture
depicting peace — and with
its representatives from
around the world trying to
work together — the United
Nations headquarters is a
reminder to tourists that the
hope for a more peaceful
world does exit. ❑

(6 Blocks South of 13 Mile Road)

NEW YEAR'S SAILING!

U_J

THE U.N. page 86

9AM-5:30PM (Eve. & Sat by apps only) 489-5888

Senior Adults Plan
A Tour Of Israel

New York — For those who
have never been to Israel, it's
the chance to fulfill the
dream of a lifetime. For
others, it's an opportunity to
take another look, to see
sights missed, to note
changes or just to revisit a
country about which they
care deeply. It's an opportu-
nity that Jewish adults over
55 can buy for themselves —
or that their children may
wish to give them.
This tour of Israel, to take
place Nov. 11-Dec. 1, is
tailored to the needs of senior
adults. It is being offered by
Associated Camps, an agency
of the UJA-Federation of
Greater New York, which has
specialized for more than 20
years in providing Jewish
senior adults with safe,
kosher, reasonably priced
vacations.

This tour is fully escorted
from beginning to end. Par-
ticipants in the New York
area are picked up and
returned to their homes;
those from out of town are
met and assisted at JFK
Airport.
The tour will be led by
Allan Glazerman, director of
the Block Vacation Center in
the Poconos, who is well
known for his sensitivity to
the needs of older adults and
his ability to assist them.
The trip is paced so that
participants do not get ex-
hausted.

The cost of the 21-day tour
is $2,640, double occupancy
(single supplement $550),
which includes everything.
For information, call Allan
Glazerman or Sherry Perl-
man, (212) 751-8550. ❑

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